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Charles Garry

NEWS
August 17, 1991 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorney Charles Garry, a self-styled courtroom "street fighter" whose clients included leaders of the Black Panther Party and the Rev. Jim Jones, head of the People's Temple cult, died Friday in a Berkeley hospital. He was 82. Garry suffered a massive cerebral hemorrhage at Alta Bates-Herrick Hospital after he was admitted last Sunday for a stroke, spokeswoman Carolyn Hemp said.
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BUSINESS
May 3, 2001 | LIZ PULLIAM WESTON and JAMES PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The top two executives of Internet provider EarthLink Inc. invested their personal money with company co-founder Reed E. Slatkin, who is under federal investigation for allegedly running a Ponzi scheme. Sky Dayton, EarthLink's 29-year-old chairman and a key player in the '90s Internet boom, and Chief Executive Charles Garry Betty were among the people who invested money with Slatkin, according to a company spokesman.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
Lawyers for U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar asked Tuesday for dismissal of the racketeering charge against him, saying it fails to allege bribery or any other financial motive. In papers submitted to a federal court, Aguilar's lawyers made a multi-front attack on the racketeering charge, the first against a federal judge. They also sought dismissal of three of the other seven charges against Aguilar.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | ERIC MALNIC and MARK STEIN, Times Staff Writers
A man arrested Tuesday night during an unrelated traffic stop has admitted shooting Black Panther co-founder Huey P. Newton to death during an argument over cocaine, police said Friday night. Investigators said Tyrone Robinson, 25, who has an extensive criminal record that includes a robbery conviction in 1985, killed Newton early Tuesday in an effort to advance his position in the Black Guerrilla Family, a narcotics distribution gang.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge Wednesday ordered a new trial for the only man convicted of murder in the bloody 1971 San Quentin Prison uprising that left three guards and three inmates dead. U.S. District Judge Thelton E. Henderson ruled that John L. Spain, one of the so-called San Quentin Six, was denied a fair trial more than a decade ago because he spent much of the trial shackled with 25 pounds of chains.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | DAN MORAIN and JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal jury Monday acquitted U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar of one of eight corruption counts and announced it was deadlocked on the remaining seven. Federal prosecutors, though stung by the defeat, vowed to refile charges against Aguilar, the first federal judge ever indicted in California and the first ever in the nation charged with racketeering. U.S.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2003 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
Buoyed by the positive public response to a government crackdown on telemarketers, Capitol Hill lawmakers vowed Wednesday to set their sights next on e-mail spammers who clog in-boxes with more than 100 billion unsolicited electronic messages a day. After years of ignoring the problem, Congress and several states are searching for ways to curb e-mail pitches for pornography, get-rich schemes and weight-loss elixirs. "We can say no to unwanted visitors. We can say no to telemarketers.
NEWS
June 10, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department placed wiretaps on telephones in U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar's chambers and home as part of its inquiry into the judge's actions in 1987 and 1988, Aguilar's lawyer said Friday. Attorney Charles Garry, while chastising the government for "leaks" about its pending case, said Aguilar could be indicted as early as next week on charges of racketeering. "I think it stinks," Garry declared, referring to what he said was the government's eavesdropping on the federal judge's private chambers.
NEWS
March 7, 1986 | DAN MORAIN and MARK STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Representatives of the government of Philippine President Corazon Aquino will assume control of a $33-million downtown office building project that has been among the suspected U.S. holdings of exiled President Ferdinand E. Marcos, lawyers announced here Thursday. The agreement, involving a choice parcel of land in this city's fashionable Union Square shopping district, is believed to be the first transfer of such holdings to the new Aquino administration.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As hundreds of worshipers filed into the First African Methodist Episcopal Church, Los Angeles' oldest and most prominent black congregation, several dozen protesters stood across the street, waving picket signs. One read: "The snitch got to go. Free Geronimo." The demonstrators were an unsettling challenge to a venerable institution, and their target on that Sunday in January was no less than the 61-year-old chairman of First A.M.E.'s Board of Trustees: Julius C. (Julio) Butler.
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