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MAGAZINE
March 2, 2003 | Mark Ehrman, Mark Ehrman, a Los Angeles-based freelance writer, is a frequent contributor to the magazine.
A four-person panel convenes in a swank Los Feliz lounge in conjunction with the Silver Lake Film Festival. The topic: illicit substances in American culture. Sitting around the table are the kind of indie/alternative types one would associate with a festival such as this: an LA Weekly writer, a documentary filmmaker and the playwright who adapted the cult documentary "Reefer Madness" to the stage. They dress casually and make intimate references to drug use. Not so the final participant.
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MAGAZINE
March 2, 2003 | Mark Ehrman, Mark Ehrman, a Los Angeles-based freelance writer, is a frequent contributor to the magazine.
A four-person panel convenes in a swank Los Feliz lounge in conjunction with the Silver Lake Film Festival. The topic: illicit substances in American culture. Sitting around the table are the kind of indie/alternative types one would associate with a festival such as this: an LA Weekly writer, a documentary filmmaker and the playwright who adapted the cult documentary "Reefer Madness" to the stage. They dress casually and make intimate references to drug use. Not so the final participant.
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NEWS
March 23, 2003
How sad that George Ricaurte receives government funding for killing primates with overdoses of Ecstasy to "prove" its ill effects on humans ("The Heretical Dr. X," by Mark Ehrman, March 2). But not a penny goes to psychiatrist Charles Grob to research the 1.4 million young adults who use the drug regularly. G. Harry McLaughlin Glendale
MAGAZINE
March 2, 2008
Thank you, Gina Piccalo, for an amazing piece on ayahuasca ("Strange Brew," Feb. 3). Quoting Dr. Charles Grob of Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and pharmacologist J.C. Callaway was wise, as their comments give some credibility to this powerful substance. At the same time, Skeptic magazine editor Michael Shermer's comments encapsulated the reticence of those who are wary of treatments such as this. I think it was a fair, nonbiased and extremely enlightening article, and I'm grateful that you brought this information to the masses.
HEALTH
April 11, 2005 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
People dying of incurable diseases are often crippled by depression, fear and anxiety. But the drugs that offer relief for those problems can be overly sedating, making patients mentally foggy. A long-outlawed treatment may be the answer. Within the next few months, a group of late-stage cancer patients will be given an illicit party drug to see if it can help them come to terms with their situation. That chemical is MDMA, better known as Ecstasy.
HEALTH
January 13, 2003 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
The recent approval of Prozac for children and teenagers means more of them are likely to be treated for depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. It also means that many could be treated inappropriately. The Food and Drug Administration's decision to allow the drug to be prescribed for kids 7 to 17 will encourage more primary-care doctors, pediatricians and family-practice doctors to prescribe the antidepressant. That could especially benefit children who lack access to psychiatrists.
SCIENCE
September 7, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The psychedelic drug psilocybin, the active ingredient in "magic mushrooms," can improve mood and reduce anxiety and depression in terminal cancer patients, Los Angeles researchers reported Monday. A single modest dose of the hallucinogen, whose reputation was severely tarnished by widespread nonmedical use in the psychedelic '60s and ethical lapses by researchers such as Timothy Leary, can improve patients' functioning for as long as six months, allowing them to spend their last days with more peace, researchers said.
HEALTH
July 12, 2010 | By Jill U Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles is earning a reputation as a hotbed of raves — those dance parties that sometimes last all night and feature pulsing electronic music, light shows and recreational drugs. In addition to drawing tens of thousands of young people to events, the city's raves have attracted the notice of local and federal public health officials because of the number of emergency room visits that result. During a two-day event last month at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum with an estimated 185,000 participants, some 120 people were taken to local hospitals, many with symptoms of drug intoxication.
NEWS
August 8, 1992 | KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To kill one's children--then take one's own life--violates such powerful societal and moral taboos that such cases seldom occur. To see two murder-suicides within 15 miles of each other in the same week is extraordinary, say mental health experts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1991 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 14-year-old who disappeared 17 days ago, apparently despondent about his facial scars, surprised relatives here and in Mexico when he showed up at the home of an aunt and uncle in Mexico City late Monday night. Francisco Vargas Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1992 | ERIC YOUNG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hours after delivering her own baby early Thursday, a Santa Ana woman tossed the newborn from a bathroom window, police said. Police officers found the four-pound infant wrapped in a white T-shirt and crying as he lay in a small patch of dirt and grass in an alley about five feet below the first-story window. The infant, not yet cleaned from the birth, was taken to UCI Medical Center in Orange, where he was in stable condition, Lt. Robert Helton said.
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