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Charles Horman

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NEWS
April 20, 1993
Edmund C. Horman, whose quest for information about his son's disappearance and death in Chile during a 1973 military coup was turned into the Academy Award-winning film "Missing," has died. He was 87. Horman, who lived in Manhattan, died of pneumonia in New York City on Friday. When he flew to Chile 20 years ago in search of his son, Charles, Horman knew that soldiers had seized the youth but not that they had killed him.
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WORLD
November 30, 2011 | By Fabiola Gutierrez and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
A Chilean judge is seeking the extradition of a former U.S. military officer to face murder charges in the 1973 slaying of freelance journalist and filmmaker Charles Horman, a case dramatized in the Oscar-winning film "Missing," court sources confirmed Tuesday. Judge Jorge Zepeda wants former U.S. Navy Capt. Ray E. Davis, whose whereabouts were not immediately clear Tuesday, to face trial in Chile for his alleged involvement in the deaths of Horman and U.S. student Frank Teruggi.
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NEWS
August 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Chile's Supreme Court has authorized an investigating judge to submit questions to former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger about the assassination of an American filmmaker during Gen. Augusto Pinochet's rule. Judge Juan Guzman, who has sought unsuccessfully to try Pinochet on human rights charges, wants to question Kissinger as part of his probe into the death of Charles Horman, who was killed shortly after the dictator seized power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Nathaniel Davis, a longtime diplomat who was the American ambassador to Chile when President Salvador Allende was deposed in a bloody coup, died of cancer Monday in Claremont. He was 86. His death was announced by Claremont's Harvey Mudd College, where he taught political science for 19 years until his retirement in 2002. Once described as a "brilliant career officer" by former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, Davis also served as ambassador to Bulgaria, Guatemala and Switzerland.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | Associated Press
The widow of an American whose arrest and slaying in a 1973 military coup inspired the movie "Missing" returned to Chile on Saturday to witness the end of Gen. Augusto Pinochet's 16-year rule. Joyce Horman, invited by the elected government that takes power today, told reporters at Santiago's airport she does not expect the political change to produce any new information about her husband's death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1999
We rejoice in the news that Augusto Pinochet, the brutal and unrepentant ex-dictator of Chile, has been refused permission by Britain's Law Lords to return to Chile (March 25). He now faces extradition to Spain, where he has been charged with crimes against humanity. Now, what about the U.S.? Will Atty. Gen. Janet Reno issue arrest warrants against Pinochet for the car bomb assassination of Orlando Letelier and Ronni Moffitt in Washington and the summary executions in the Santiago soccer stadium of Californian Frank Teruggi, a UC Santa Barbara student, and Charles Horman, another young American activist (see the movie "Missing," starring Jack Lemmon as Horman's father)
NEWS
July 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
An informant told the U.S. Embassy in Chile in 1987 that an American filmmaker killed in the tumultuous aftermath of a 1973 military coup was shot by Chilean soldiers because he was judged to be a "foreign extremist," according to government documents made public Friday. The source of the information was not disclosed, and the documents indicated that the embassy was unable to determine whether the information was credible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Nathaniel Davis, a longtime diplomat who was the American ambassador to Chile when President Salvador Allende was deposed in a bloody coup, died of cancer Monday in Claremont. He was 86. His death was announced by Claremont's Harvey Mudd College, where he taught political science for 19 years until his retirement in 2002. Once described as a "brilliant career officer" by former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, Davis also served as ambassador to Bulgaria, Guatemala and Switzerland.
WORLD
November 30, 2011 | By Fabiola Gutierrez and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
A Chilean judge is seeking the extradition of a former U.S. military officer to face murder charges in the 1973 slaying of freelance journalist and filmmaker Charles Horman, a case dramatized in the Oscar-winning film "Missing," court sources confirmed Tuesday. Judge Jorge Zepeda wants former U.S. Navy Capt. Ray E. Davis, whose whereabouts were not immediately clear Tuesday, to face trial in Chile for his alleged involvement in the deaths of Horman and U.S. student Frank Teruggi.
BOOKS
July 24, 1988 | ELENA BRUNET
"Berlin Diaries" is the record of Marie (Missy) Vassiltchikov, a White Russian aristocrat, displaced by the Russian Revolution and compelled to seek refuge and work in Hitler's Germany. The diary begins Jan. 1, 1940, with the departure of Missy's family from Lithuania to Berlin and documents in a breezy, charming style her acclimation to Berlin life.
NEWS
August 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Chile's Supreme Court has authorized an investigating judge to submit questions to former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger about the assassination of an American filmmaker during Gen. Augusto Pinochet's rule. Judge Juan Guzman, who has sought unsuccessfully to try Pinochet on human rights charges, wants to question Kissinger as part of his probe into the death of Charles Horman, who was killed shortly after the dictator seized power.
NEWS
July 1, 2000 | From Associated Press
An informant told the U.S. Embassy in Chile in 1987 that an American filmmaker killed in the tumultuous aftermath of a 1973 military coup was shot by Chilean soldiers because he was judged to be a "foreign extremist," according to government documents made public Friday. The source of the information was not disclosed, and the documents indicated that the embassy was unable to determine whether the information was credible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1999
We rejoice in the news that Augusto Pinochet, the brutal and unrepentant ex-dictator of Chile, has been refused permission by Britain's Law Lords to return to Chile (March 25). He now faces extradition to Spain, where he has been charged with crimes against humanity. Now, what about the U.S.? Will Atty. Gen. Janet Reno issue arrest warrants against Pinochet for the car bomb assassination of Orlando Letelier and Ronni Moffitt in Washington and the summary executions in the Santiago soccer stadium of Californian Frank Teruggi, a UC Santa Barbara student, and Charles Horman, another young American activist (see the movie "Missing," starring Jack Lemmon as Horman's father)
NEWS
April 20, 1993
Edmund C. Horman, whose quest for information about his son's disappearance and death in Chile during a 1973 military coup was turned into the Academy Award-winning film "Missing," has died. He was 87. Horman, who lived in Manhattan, died of pneumonia in New York City on Friday. When he flew to Chile 20 years ago in search of his son, Charles, Horman knew that soldiers had seized the youth but not that they had killed him.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | Associated Press
The widow of an American whose arrest and slaying in a 1973 military coup inspired the movie "Missing" returned to Chile on Saturday to witness the end of Gen. Augusto Pinochet's 16-year rule. Joyce Horman, invited by the elected government that takes power today, told reporters at Santiago's airport she does not expect the political change to produce any new information about her husband's death.
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gen. Augusto Pinochet handed over the Chilean presidency Sunday to his elected successor and old political foe Patricio Aylwin in a raucous and emotion-filled ceremony that ended 16 years of military rule here. Aylwin, 71-year-old leader of the coalition that unseated Pinochet, immediately granted pardons for all "prisoners of conscience" and restored diplomatic relations with the Soviet Union and several Eastern European countries as the first official acts of his four-year term.
NEWS
September 10, 2000 | KEN GUGGENHEIM, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The rugged, isolated mountains of southeastern Chile beckoned Boris Weisfeiler almost 16 years ago. A slight, 43-year-old Penn State math professor, his passion was lacing up his boots, strapping on his backpack and trekking alone through the wilderness. Weisfeiler's sister, Olga, warned against traveling by himself. Too many wild animals, she said. He shrugged that off. "Animals aren't dangerous," he said. "People are." Weisfeiler disappeared in those mountains.
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