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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2003
A memorial service for comedy writer Charles Isaacs will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Writers Guild Theater, 135 S. Doheny Drive, Beverly Hills. Isaacs died Dec. 13. He was 88.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2003
A memorial service for comedy writer Charles Isaacs will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Writers Guild Theater, 135 S. Doheny Drive, Beverly Hills. Isaacs died Dec. 13. He was 88.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2002 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Charles Isaacs, a comedy writer whose career spanned work with Bing Crosby and Milton Berle on radio and Red Skelton and Bob Hope on television, has died. He was 88. Isaacs died of cancer Friday at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica. Among his numerous television credits are stints as head writer of the Skelton and Dinah Shore shows and "The Real McCoys," as well as creating, writing and producing the sitcoms "Hey Jeannie" and "The Tycoon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2002 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Charles Isaacs, a comedy writer whose career spanned work with Bing Crosby and Milton Berle on radio and Red Skelton and Bob Hope on television, has died. He was 88. Isaacs died of cancer Friday at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica. Among his numerous television credits are stints as head writer of the Skelton and Dinah Shore shows and "The Real McCoys," as well as creating, writing and producing the sitcoms "Hey Jeannie" and "The Tycoon."
BOOKS
November 18, 1990
I looked forward to a review on President Reagan's book and what did I find? A litany of hate from Reagan-basher Reeves. Really an even-handed idea of yours to have Mr. Bias himself review it. CHARLES ISAACS LOS ANGELES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1991
Re Rosenberg's "Putting a Face on War," Jan. 15: So "what TV has done best . . . is put a human face on the war." No. What TV has done best is to present an avalanche of negatives to undermine the will of the people and wither support for our troops, our purpose and our country. We have met the enemy and they are in our newsrooms. CHARLES ISAACS Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1989
Calendar knows entertainment, and putting the story on breast-feeding in the arts and entertainment section makes it official--women who want to bare their breasts publicly are performers. Cafe Rodeo should accept the verdict and put up a marquee--"Breast-Feeding Today. Noon-7 p.m. Three Shows Saturdays." But the women quoted in Ochoa's article should also accept all that the verdict entails. They should be ordered to join the American Guild of Variety Artists. I look forward to Calendar's reviews of the next batch of such publicity seekers.
SPORTS
July 29, 1995
That great picture of John Daly and his wife on your sports section front page this morning [July 24] reflects what golf truly is--torture! CHARLES ISAACS, Los Angeles Equally enjoyable as watching John Daly decimate the links of St. Andrews was reading Jim Murray's weeklong chronicle of the goings on across the pond. Murray describing the vagaries of the wind-swept golf course and the frailties of those players trying to conquer it was pure Keats in a sports jacket. Neither Campbell's miracle bunker shot on 17, nor Rocca's endless putt on 18 nor Daly's 35-foot birdie putt on the second playoff hole could have been any more clutch than Murray's performance in Scotland.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1992
The article on English brings up the old question about how liberal a liberal Democrat should be. Independent production can be rough, and non-union crafts have often been a major part of the cure. However, it presents a dilemma for a woman like English, who seems to welcome being high-profile. Shall she embrace the claimed policy of the Democratic Party and support labor, the working man and woman, the blue collars, or think of profit and be the hard-nosed employer, businesswoman--slave to the almighty dollar?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1986
One has to admire the tenacity of Lila Garrett. She'll be Geraldine Ferraro II before we know it. Especially with the Los Angeles Times' readiness to print anything resembling an attack on Reagan or, in fact, this government. I'm surprised you don't have May Company ads selling T-shirts with anti-Reagan captions. Garrett's simplistic reasoning that the government is censoring television is ridiculous when one sees the preponderance of anti-Administration documentaries on PBS, mostly supported by tax dollars.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1996 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Reluctantly, here is the mail. The opinions of yours truly are so infinitely wise and brilliantly expressed that you expect these pearls of intellect to go unchallenged. But no! There are always some readers who foolishly think they know better. Take the first of today's excerpted letters, for example. It defiantly rebuts a column of mine (one I personally found to be dazzling) that lamented the decision to exclude TV from the civil trial of O.J. Simpson. And the second letter attacks my gleaming treatise on the new Fox News Channel.
SPORTS
July 29, 1995
That great picture of John Daly and his wife on your sports section front page this morning [July 24] reflects what golf truly is--torture! CHARLES ISAACS, Los Angeles Equally enjoyable as watching John Daly decimate the links of St. Andrews was reading Jim Murray's weeklong chronicle of the goings on across the pond. Murray describing the vagaries of the wind-swept golf course and the frailties of those players trying to conquer it was pure Keats in a sports jacket. Neither Campbell's miracle bunker shot on 17, nor Rocca's endless putt on 18 nor Daly's 35-foot birdie putt on the second playoff hole could have been any more clutch than Murray's performance in Scotland.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1992
The article on English brings up the old question about how liberal a liberal Democrat should be. Independent production can be rough, and non-union crafts have often been a major part of the cure. However, it presents a dilemma for a woman like English, who seems to welcome being high-profile. Shall she embrace the claimed policy of the Democratic Party and support labor, the working man and woman, the blue collars, or think of profit and be the hard-nosed employer, businesswoman--slave to the almighty dollar?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1991
Re "A Love Song to the Troops" by Steve Hochman, Feb. 12: If I understand correctly, the money from the "Voices That Care" video will go to "the groups supporting the troops and their families." Will this include groups that support the troops but not the war? I found a lot of waffling going on in the article, indicated by statements such as "regardless of how I feel about this (war), I want people over there to know we are for them" and "we all have private (political) feelings, but I'm keeping mine to myself."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1991
Re Rosenberg's "Putting a Face on War," Jan. 15: So "what TV has done best . . . is put a human face on the war." No. What TV has done best is to present an avalanche of negatives to undermine the will of the people and wither support for our troops, our purpose and our country. We have met the enemy and they are in our newsrooms. CHARLES ISAACS Los Angeles
BOOKS
November 18, 1990
I looked forward to a review on President Reagan's book and what did I find? A litany of hate from Reagan-basher Reeves. Really an even-handed idea of yours to have Mr. Bias himself review it. CHARLES ISAACS LOS ANGELES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1988
Lawrence Christon is probably one of the more apt appraisers of comedy, but in his article on Mark Russell I wondered if he liked Mark Russell for his wit, or his political bias ("Russell Knows the Lighter Side of Washington," Feb. 22). Russell made a stab at writing for TV, but if his words don't have a musical score behind them they lose something. However, while he was here he picked up--by osmosis--some of the Hollywood pseudopolitical chitchat, and where he used to show flashes of wit he now shows dismal vehemence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1991
Re "A Love Song to the Troops" by Steve Hochman, Feb. 12: If I understand correctly, the money from the "Voices That Care" video will go to "the groups supporting the troops and their families." Will this include groups that support the troops but not the war? I found a lot of waffling going on in the article, indicated by statements such as "regardless of how I feel about this (war), I want people over there to know we are for them" and "we all have private (political) feelings, but I'm keeping mine to myself."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1989
Calendar knows entertainment, and putting the story on breast-feeding in the arts and entertainment section makes it official--women who want to bare their breasts publicly are performers. Cafe Rodeo should accept the verdict and put up a marquee--"Breast-Feeding Today. Noon-7 p.m. Three Shows Saturdays." But the women quoted in Ochoa's article should also accept all that the verdict entails. They should be ordered to join the American Guild of Variety Artists. I look forward to Calendar's reviews of the next batch of such publicity seekers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1988
Lawrence Christon is probably one of the more apt appraisers of comedy, but in his article on Mark Russell I wondered if he liked Mark Russell for his wit, or his political bias ("Russell Knows the Lighter Side of Washington," Feb. 22). Russell made a stab at writing for TV, but if his words don't have a musical score behind them they lose something. However, while he was here he picked up--by osmosis--some of the Hollywood pseudopolitical chitchat, and where he used to show flashes of wit he now shows dismal vehemence.
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