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Charles Johnson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Charles Johnson, 96, a former Negro League player who was credited with helping to pave the way for blacks to play in the major leagues, died Saturday of complications from prostate cancer. After his playing career, Johnson worked to push major league baseball to offer pensions to former Negro League players. He also won an anti-discrimination lawsuit against Illinois Central Railroad in the mid-1960s after he was turned down for a special agent position, said his friend Steve Kirby.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010 | James Rainey
Back when he built his Little Green Footballs website into a favorite of the conservative right, Charles Johnson liked to write about the "Loony Left" and "Bush Derangement Syndrome." He would pair accounts of extremist violence with sarcastic headlines about Islam, the "Religion of Peace." A 2006 anti-war rally in Washington went down as an "Idiotfest" and activist Cindy Sheehan "Mama Moonbat." Imagine the surprise among conservatives to learn -- in a series of postings over nearly the last two years, and then in an official declaration of estrangement a little more than a month ago -- that their darling did not love them anymore.
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BOOKS
March 30, 1986 | J. J. Phillips, Phillips is the author of "Mojo Hand," recently reissued by City Miner Books. and
"The Sorcerer's Apprentice," a collection of short fiction by the author of "Oxherding Tale," is a slim volume. But it has a depth and range of perspective that more than compensate for its brevity. The writing of short stories is a delicate task in that the economy of form requires that words be used with precision, and such isn't always easy to come by.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2009 | Susannah Rosenblatt
On a dull Wilmington corner, where big rigs shudder by, Pat Johnson stands in protest. A homemade sign, black and blue marker stenciled on white poster board, explains: "In loving memory of my husband Charles Johnson who died at UP from neglect." Johnson is unsure what, if anything, the public vigils she and her two daughters keep outside the Union Pacific rail yard will do. Offer closure, maybe. Acknowledgment of what she and her daughters have lost. Time to grieve.
SPORTS
September 18, 1991 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His national championship ring, the one with eight tiny diamonds assembled in the shape of a No. 1, is the size of a truck lug nut. Charles Johnson wears it proudly. He ought to, since it was Johnson who made possible Colorado's controversial claim as the nation's best team of 1990. Think about it: A season ago, it was Johnson, Colorado's second-string quarterback, who replaced injured Darian Hagan and helped preserve a 20-14 victory over Washington, ranked 12th at the time.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maybe it was the woman down the street with that snarly dog, Rufus. Or perhaps it was that television anchorman in Tacoma, maybe it was his doing. Or maybe it was everyone's good friend Charlie. Surely, something can explain one of America's more dumbfounding electoral upsets.
NEWS
August 20, 1990 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixteen years ago, critics were describing "Faith and the Good Thing," Charles Johnson's book about a young black woman's quest for the meaning of life, as "brilliant" and "ebullient," the sort of first novel with which to anchor a major career. Eight years later, his second novel, "Oxherding Tale," traveled forlornly from publisher to publisher, like a flagless ship searching for a port, before diminutive Indiana University Press finally accepted it.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2010 | James Rainey
Back when he built his Little Green Footballs website into a favorite of the conservative right, Charles Johnson liked to write about the "Loony Left" and "Bush Derangement Syndrome." He would pair accounts of extremist violence with sarcastic headlines about Islam, the "Religion of Peace." A 2006 anti-war rally in Washington went down as an "Idiotfest" and activist Cindy Sheehan "Mama Moonbat." Imagine the surprise among conservatives to learn -- in a series of postings over nearly the last two years, and then in an official declaration of estrangement a little more than a month ago -- that their darling did not love them anymore.
NEWS
April 19, 1998 | DAVID STREITFELD, THE WASHINGTON POST
It was a warm spring day, the first of the season, so Charles Johnson had opened the window in his college dorm room. Through it, he heard a voice shouting: The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had been shot. Across the country the riots were beginning. Johnson was in black studies at Southern Illinois University, a Marxist, a respectful if distant admirer of King. But he didn't riot, didn't even leave his room.
SPORTS
December 23, 2000
Let's see . . . Alex Rodriguez to the Rangers, Mike Mussina to the Yankees, Manny Ramirez to the Red Sox . . . Charles Johnson to the Marlins . . . Mike Hampton to the Rockies . . . Yep, the Dodgers are right on pace to finish fourth in the NL West. By my calculations, the Dodgers have done four things this off-season: 1. Re-signed Darren Dreifort to a completely absurd contract. 2. Made signing Chan Ho Park a lot costlier by giving Dreifort that ridiculous contract. 3. Signed journeyman fourth starter Andy Ashby, who will again be able to hide behind Kevin Brown, as he did in San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
The Essential Writings of James Weldon Johnson Edited and with an introduction by Rudolph P. Byrd Modern Library: 322 pp., $15 paper This collection of poetry, fiction, criticism, autobiography, political writing and two unpublished plays by James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938) spans 60 years of pure triumph over adversity. Johnson, born nine years after the Emancipation Proclamation, wrote during what Charles Johnson in his foreword calls "the most entrenched period of American apartheid -- the 1920s and '30s," through the Great Depression, through the "rise of racial eugenics, and black lynchings throughout the South."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2006 | Paul Farhi, Washington Post
Charles Johnson could tell there was something wrong with the news photo the minute he saw it. Something about the three plumes of black smoke rising over the buildings -- smoke just doesn't curl that way, pirouetting in unison. It was, he wrote Saturday, "blatant evidence of manipulation." He was right on target. The Reuters photo showing the aftermath of an Israeli airstrike on Beirut was doctored.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Charles Johnson, 96, a former Negro League player who was credited with helping to pave the way for blacks to play in the major leagues, died Saturday of complications from prostate cancer. After his playing career, Johnson worked to push major league baseball to offer pensions to former Negro League players. He also won an anti-discrimination lawsuit against Illinois Central Railroad in the mid-1960s after he was turned down for a special agent position, said his friend Steve Kirby.
BOOKS
February 27, 2005 | Paula L. Woods, Paula L. Woods is the author of the Charlotte Justice mystery series.
With a National Book Award, MacArthur Fellowship and Writers Guild Award for screenwriting to his credit, Charles Johnson is among the most-lauded writers in America. The American Academy of Arts and Letters gave him its prestigious award in 2002, praising his short stories for ingeniously braiding "history, philosophy, and imagination in making postmodern fiction of the highest order." The eight stories comprising "Dr.
SPORTS
November 17, 2002 | From Wire Reports
Catcher Charles Johnson reversed his decision and approved a trade to the Colorado Rockies, his agent said Saturday, clearing the way for a six-player deal that sends left-hander Mike Hampton to the Florida Marlins. Hampton might not stay in Florida for long. A lawyer familiar with the situation told Associated Press on condition of anonymity that the Marlins were working on a deal that would send Hampton to the Atlanta Braves.
SPORTS
December 4, 2001 | Associated Press
Faced with a deadline Monday to decide whether to become a free agent, catcher Charles Johnson opted to remain with the Florida Marlins, even though the team has no manager, no general manager and an owner who is trying to sell the club. Johnson, 30, has four years and $30 million remaining on a $35-million, five-year contract. * John Franco, the New York Mets' primary setup man, had surgery to remove scar tissue in his elbow.
SPORTS
August 30, 1998
Dodger catcher Charles Johnson has the worst batting average from the 7th inning on in the majors. A look at the best and worst this season: BEST Player, Team: Avg. Dante Bichette, Colorado Rockies: .371 (62-167) Carl Everett, Houston Astros: .353 (48-136) Derek Bell, Houston Astros: .345 (57-165) Mo Vaughn, Boston Red Sox: .344 (53-154) Jim Thome, Cleveland Indians: .341 (45-132) WORST Player, Team: Avg. Charles Johnson, Dodgers: .152 (22-145) Todd Dunwoody, Florida Marlins: .
SPORTS
April 20, 2001 | Associated Press
Charles Johnson hit two home runs and the Marlins' relievers held the lead for their first win of the season as Florida beat the Montreal Expos, 5-2, Thursday night at Miami. "It was great to see the bullpen come in and close the book," Johnson said. "Close ballgames drain you, especially if you come out of them with a loss." Johnson hit solo homers in the second and the sixth before the Marlins broke a 2-2 tie with a three-run eighth inning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"We have studied the Earth," he assured anybody who would listen, "and found it flat." That plane Earth, he insisted, is of unknown dimensions, a disc with the North Pole in the center and impenetrable Arctic ice 150 feet high all the way around. The sun and moon, each 32 miles in diameter, circle the disc at a steady height of 3,000 miles, with so-called rising or setting only an optical illusion. Charles K.
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