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May 20, 1995 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 50th anniversary of the end of World War II makes this a fitting year for Romulus Linney's "2," which examines No. 2 Nazi Hermann Goering's final days as a prisoner and Nuremberg defendant in 1945-46. And actor Charles Lanyer cuts a striking figure as Goering at International City Theatre in Long Beach. But the play, at least as presented in Jessica Kubzansky's staging, hardly merits the accolades it has received, which include a national critics' award.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1995 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 50th anniversary of the end of World War II makes this a fitting year for Romulus Linney's "2," which examines No. 2 Nazi Hermann Goering's final days as a prisoner and Nuremberg defendant in 1945-46. And actor Charles Lanyer cuts a striking figure as Goering at International City Theatre in Long Beach. But the play, at least as presented in Jessica Kubzansky's staging, hardly merits the accolades it has received, which include a national critics' award.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
A tip for playwrights: If you've had trouble placing your script at South Coast Repertory, change the setting to Borneo and make the hero an innocent American in the clutches of the CIA. "Rum and Coke" and "Highest Standard of Living" both followed that pattern, and now we have "Haut Gout" by Allan Havis at SCR's Second Stage. The setting is Haiti and the hero is an idealistic American doctor (Charles Lanyer) who thinks he's there on a U. S.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1989 | Jan Herman
If Michelle Pfeiffer, one of the world's most beautiful actresses, can say she is less than happy with her looks because of the way her lips curl downward at the corners of her mouth, then it is easy to understand why Cyrano has such a profound reaction to his giant-size nose. That at least is how Charles Lanyer, the star of "Cyrano de Bergerac" at the Grove Shakespeare Festival, explains what he believes to be "the universal appeal" of Edmond Rostand's crowd-pleasing hero.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1989 | Jan Herman
If Michelle Pfeiffer, one of the world's most beautiful actresses, can say she is less than happy with her looks because of the way her lips curl downward at the corners of her mouth, then it is easy to understand why Cyrano has such a profound reaction to his giant-size nose. That at least is how Charles Lanyer, the star of "Cyrano de Bergerac" at the Grove Shakespeare Festival, explains what he believes to be "the universal appeal" of Edmond Rostand's crowd-pleasing hero.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Huckert's "Hard," one of the best films from Outfest '98, is an ambitious and successful first effort, a taut, chilling police procedural that plays the plight of a closeted gay cop (Noel Palomaria) against the rampaging of a savage serial killer (Malcolm Moorman). "Hard" represents an imaginative, provocative use of genre that is rightly deeply disturbing in its implications.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1987 | RAY LOYND
The late Preston Jones' "Texas Trilogy" of life in a small southwest Texas town is about dying pride--local denizens clinging to the remnants of tattered flags. The least of these three plays, "Lu Ann Hampton Laverty Overlander," receives a solid production by the Bank Playhouse at the comfortably appointed Balcony Theater at the Pasadena Playhouse. The acting is impressive and the production a crowd pleaser. "Lu Ann Hampton . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1998 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"Arcadia" is the most romantic play about thermodynamics and chaos theory ever written. It is also the most enjoyable. Understanding this, South Coast Repertory has paid careful attention to casting the two romantic leads in its worthwhile new production of "Arcadia," Tom Stoppard's extraordinary 1993 intellectual detective story.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1999 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cocky, 25-year-old piano virtuoso travels to Vienna, expecting to study with a master piano teacher who will work him through a performing block that is paralyzing his career. Instead, he finds that he must first spend several months studying with an aging, eccentric vocal teacher. Worlds apart, yet more alike than they know, these men butt heads immediately.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
The Los Angeles Actors' Theatre is billing its new show as "William Shakespeare's 'Hamlet,' directed and freely adapted by Charles Marowitz." It would be more accurate to call it "Charles Marowitz's 'Hamlet,' based on materials supplied by William Shakespeare." Marowitz started doing his Shakespearean collages more than 20 years ago. The idea is to shake up the original text, as you might a box of Scrabble letters, and see what new combinations are called forth.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
A tip for playwrights: If you've had trouble placing your script at South Coast Repertory, change the setting to Borneo and make the hero an innocent American in the clutches of the CIA. "Rum and Coke" and "Highest Standard of Living" both followed that pattern, and now we have "Haut Gout" by Allan Havis at SCR's Second Stage. The setting is Haiti and the hero is an idealistic American doctor (Charles Lanyer) who thinks he's there on a U. S.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1985 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
There's a difference between magic and tricks, and the innovative and the arbitrary. Into the breach tumbles the Grove Shakespeare Festival production of Shakespeare's "The Tempest." Ken Sonkin, dressed in a tux, plays some very witty magic tricks out front before curtain, before he metamorphoses into a spritely onstage Ariel (Sonkin is an acrobat as well as a magician, and he's a real find for the theater).
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