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Charles Lindbergh

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September 2, 2007 | Matthew Price, Matthew Price is a journalist and critic in New York.
It was one of the more fascinating, odd and troubling scientific ventures of the last century. An outline reads like some pulp sci-fi tale: During the 1930s, a hero pilot teams up with a brilliant surgeon in a spooky, black-walled lab to unlock the secret of eternal life to save the West. It sounds a bit nutty, but this isn't fiction. The aviator was Charles Lindbergh and the doctor was Alexis Carrel, a diminutive Frenchman with a dainty pince-nez perched on his face.
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NEWS
August 13, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The U.S. Grant Hotel in San Diego pays tribute to San Diego International Airport's recent upgrade and Charles Lindbergh's stay at the hotel in 1927 -- all in one tidy little deal. In honor of the aviation events from two different centuries, guests who book a suite at the Grant may stay a second night for $19.27. The deal: The Lindbergh Legacy, as the offer is called, offers the second and fourth nights in a suite for $19.27 a night plus tax. It requires a two-night minimum stay, and reservations may be made online or by phone.
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MAGAZINE
October 3, 2004 | Michael D'Antonio, Michael D'Antonio last wrote for the magazine about Fred Boyce, a Massachusetts resident "adopted" by a small town in Oregon after they heard he had been wrongly institutionalized as a child.
Retired psychologist Mylen Fitzwater answers the doorbell in less than 30 seconds, but he keeps the screen door closed. I explain that I've come to his quiet cul-de-sac in the central California city of Merced to research an article about one of his former patients. "It's that guy standing behind me," I say, nodding toward the old man in a dark blue suit who stands blinking in the sunlight. "The one who thinks he was the Lindbergh baby."
BOOKS
September 2, 2007 | Matthew Price, Matthew Price is a journalist and critic in New York.
It was one of the more fascinating, odd and troubling scientific ventures of the last century. An outline reads like some pulp sci-fi tale: During the 1930s, a hero pilot teams up with a brilliant surgeon in a spooky, black-walled lab to unlock the secret of eternal life to save the West. It sounds a bit nutty, but this isn't fiction. The aviator was Charles Lindbergh and the doctor was Alexis Carrel, a diminutive Frenchman with a dainty pince-nez perched on his face.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
An aluminum propeller from the plane that aviator Charles Lindbergh flew from New York to China in 1931 was sold for $42,000 at a Christie's International auction in New York City. The propeller, from a Lockheed Sirius aircraft, was bought by an anonymous bidder as part of a sale that included 19th century paintings. A bubble sextant that Lindbergh used to navigate on his record-setting 1930 flight from California to New York went to an anonymous bidder for $26,400.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2001
The makers of "Chasing the Sun" discuss the four-part series produced by KCET/Hollywood, which celebrates such buccaneers of the sky as the Wright brothers and Charles Lindbergh as well as some unsung heroes.
REAL ESTATE
December 31, 1989 | RUTH RYON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along with the sounds of Hauoli Makahiki Hou, Hawaiian for Happy New Year, come these island items. From Maui: MIKE LOVE of the Beach Boys has purchased the home of CHARLES and ANNE MORROW LINDBERGH. Love bought the 5-acre estate, down a twisting, scenic road a few miles from the remote village of Hana, from the aviator's widow for about $1 million, said a Maui realty source. The property had been listed at $1.5 million.
WORLD
May 3, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
AND FINALLY . . . Erik Lindbergh popped out of the cockpit, furiously waving his arms in the air, after completing a 17-hour flight from New York to Paris. His grandfather, aviation pioneer Charles Lindbergh, made the groundbreaking solo, nonstop flight across the Atlantic in 1927, crossing the ocean in 33 1/2 hours, nibbling on just one sandwich. "I really wanted to celebrate the 75th anniversary of grandfather's flight," Erik Lindbergh said at a news conference.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2001 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Chasing the Sun," a high-flying, four-part chronicle of commercial aviation, takes off from the PBS runway tonight at 9 on KCET and KVCR. Propelled by a nicely assembled mix of interviews, archival material and reenactments, this dandy documentary tells us all about the friendly skies and the people who conquered them. Appropriately, the first hour opens with the story of Orville and Wilbur Wright, the bicycle mechanics who stood on the beach at Kitty Hawk, N.C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2006
June 14, 1927: The people of Los Angeles celebrated the 150th anniversary of the American flag all over town -- in classrooms, clubs and in a mass meeting at Patriotic Hall, The Times reported under the headline, "FLAG GLORIFIED BY ENTIRE CITY." Flag Day exercises conducted by the Sunset Masonic Lodge celebrated Charles Lindbergh, who just the month before had flown across the Atlantic from New York to Paris.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2006
Sept. 20, 1927: When Charles Lindbergh arrived on the Spirit of St. Louis as part of a nationwide tour, 200,000 people surrounded Vail Field to greet the young man who in May had become the first person to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2006
June 14, 1927: The people of Los Angeles celebrated the 150th anniversary of the American flag all over town -- in classrooms, clubs and in a mass meeting at Patriotic Hall, The Times reported under the headline, "FLAG GLORIFIED BY ENTIRE CITY." Flag Day exercises conducted by the Sunset Masonic Lodge celebrated Charles Lindbergh, who just the month before had flown across the Atlantic from New York to Paris.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
An aluminum propeller from the plane that aviator Charles Lindbergh flew from New York to China in 1931 was sold for $42,000 at a Christie's International auction in New York City. The propeller, from a Lockheed Sirius aircraft, was bought by an anonymous bidder as part of a sale that included 19th century paintings. A bubble sextant that Lindbergh used to navigate on his record-setting 1930 flight from California to New York went to an anonymous bidder for $26,400.
MAGAZINE
October 3, 2004 | Michael D'Antonio, Michael D'Antonio last wrote for the magazine about Fred Boyce, a Massachusetts resident "adopted" by a small town in Oregon after they heard he had been wrongly institutionalized as a child.
Retired psychologist Mylen Fitzwater answers the doorbell in less than 30 seconds, but he keeps the screen door closed. I explain that I've come to his quiet cul-de-sac in the central California city of Merced to research an article about one of his former patients. "It's that guy standing behind me," I say, nodding toward the old man in a dark blue suit who stands blinking in the sunlight. "The one who thinks he was the Lindbergh baby."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2004 | Greil Marcus, Special to The Times
Early on in Philip Roth's imagining of America as it might have been if Charles Lindbergh had defeated Franklin Roosevelt in 1940 and become president, Roth's father, Herman, his mother, Bess, his older brother, Sandy, and himself, Philip, 8 years old, make a trip to Washington, D.C. They are about to discover that, as a small Jewish family, they are a twig in a fascist sea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
After working as a civilian test pilot for Navy bombers during World War II, Ralph Charles reluctantly gave in to his wife Leona's plea: Stop flying. For a man who built his own airplane and barnstormed in Ohio in the 1920s, co-piloted pioneer passenger planes in the 1930s and operated a charter service in the Caribbean before the war, hanging up his wings was not easy. Charles loved flying, but he loved Leona more. "I'd do anything for her," he said decades later.
NEWS
July 13, 1988 | United Press International
A gray, white and blue single-engine airplane soared over the North Atlantic Tuesday with teddy-bear-toting Christopher Marshall still in control of his dream to retrace the trans-Atlantic solo flight of Charles Lindbergh. Marshall, 11, and Navy Cmdr. Randy "Duke" Cunningham, 46, left Frobisher Bay airport in Canada's Northwest Territories at 12:42 p.m. EDT and arrived 3 1/2 hours later at the U.S. Air Force base at Sonderstrom, Greenland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2002 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In hopes of replicating his grandfather's historic 1927 flight across the Atlantic and boosting interest in civilian aviation, Erik Lindbergh took off Sunday in a plane dubbed "The New Spirit of St. Louis." Lindbergh, 37, an artist and executive with the St. Louis-based X Prize Foundation, taxied alone down the runway at an airport named for his grandfather in a state-of-the-art single-engine Lancair Columbia 300.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2002 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Early in "Lindbergh Flies Again," the History Channel documentary on the 75th anniversary of the historic transatlantic flight, Lindbergh biographer A. Scott Berg explains how astounded the public was at what the daredevil pilot from Minnesota had done. The modern equivalent to Lindbergh's flight from New York to Paris, Berg says, would be to fly from the Earth to the moon--in a craft you helped build with money you scraped together from donations.
WORLD
May 3, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
AND FINALLY . . . Erik Lindbergh popped out of the cockpit, furiously waving his arms in the air, after completing a 17-hour flight from New York to Paris. His grandfather, aviation pioneer Charles Lindbergh, made the groundbreaking solo, nonstop flight across the Atlantic in 1927, crossing the ocean in 33 1/2 hours, nibbling on just one sandwich. "I really wanted to celebrate the 75th anniversary of grandfather's flight," Erik Lindbergh said at a news conference.
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