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Charles Lloyd

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2008 | Don Heckman
Jazz tenor saxophonist Charles Lloyd had a crossover hit in the late '60s with "Forest Flower." A couple of years later, he was on hiatus, meditating at Big Sur, seeking the links between music, spirituality and life. That quest has continued to play a role since his return in the '80s as one of jazz's most imaginative practitioners. He performs Sunday night at Catalina's. YOUR NEW CD, "RABO DE NUBE," IS TITLED AFTER A SONG WRITTEN BY CUBAN COMPOSER SILVIO RODRIGUEZ. HOW DID YOU HAPPEN TO MAKE THAT CHOICE?
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Chris Barton
In this time when news is disseminated ever more quickly, we asked our critics to list the best of culture in 2013 in tweet form: Vijay Iyer, Mike Ladd. "Holding It Down: The Veterans' Dreams Project": Jazz meets hip-hop and poetry to detail the costs of war. Haunting. Charles Lloyd and Jason Moran, "Hagar's Song": A masterful duet-as-conversation, examining familiar and undiscovered ground with grace. Matana Roberts, "Coin Coin Chapter Two: Mississippi Moonchile": Family history as social history in a swirling mix of free jazz, opera and spoken word.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Charles Lloyd was recounting his early days as a musician and the wisdom imparted to him by the late trumpeter Booker Little when he abruptly apologized for drifting off topic. "Pardon me for telling you this story," he said, speaking by phone from his house in the hills above Santa Barbara. "I live in the wilderness, and I don't edit so well. " No apology necessary. The saxophonist, 75, has a built a career on rewarding tangents, building a body of work that's helped shape the sound of jazz from the '60s into the new millennium.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Bandleader, drummer and NEA jazz master Chico Hamilton has died. He was 92 years old. Born Foreststorn Hamilton in Los Angeles in 1921, Hamilton's music career began with some notable high school classmates including future legends in their own right, Dexter Gordon and Charles Mingus. He eventually went on to perform and tour with Lester Young, Lena Horne and Gerry Mulligan before putting together his first quintet in 1955. A landmark group that forged the sound of West Coast jazz while featuring the reeds of Buddy Collette, guitarist Jim Hall, Carson Smith on bass and cellist Fred Katz , the group evolved through a wealth of jazz talent, including Eric Dolphy, Gabor Szabo and Charles Lloyd, who joined the band in 1960.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1994 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Charles Lloyd would be a perfect subject for one of those "Where Are They Now?" stories. The tenor saxophonist was one of jazz's biggest stars in the late '60s, riding a wave of fame generated by such albums as "Forest Flower" and heralded appearances at such rock venues as the Fillmore Auditorium in San Francisco. His quartet, featuring the emerging pianist Keith Jarrett, was bringing Lloyd financial success, too.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE
On this contemplative, sometimes ethereal recording, his first for ECM, saxophonist-flutist Charles Lloyd, who tends to look inward for musical direction, reaches a transcendent plateau, interweaving his interest in things spiritual with the bluesy roots of his native Memphis.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2001 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To the nagging question "Where were you on Sept. 11?," Charles Lloyd has a pointed answer. The veteran saxophonist was in Manhattan, perilously close to ground zero, when the planes hit. He would have opened a six-night run that very night at the Blue Note in Greenwich Village, in support of his then-recently released album, "Hyperion With Higgins." Of course, the Village was a ghost town for a few days after the attacks, and Lloyd didn't play the Blue Note until that Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1990 | JOSEF WOODARD
At the Montreal Jazz Festival last July, sax player Charles Lloyd strolled into the lobby of the festival's central hotel, beaming despite the jet lag. Lloyd was looking forward to the next night's concert and a brief European tour that would culminate in a recording session. A year later, the normally shy Lloyd is out in support of the finished product, "Fish Out of Water," his best-received album in perhaps 20 years.
NEWS
October 13, 1991
How original. Press coverage for a male-bashing feminist. If I gave $10 million to the National Center for Men in New York and blamed all my problems on women, could I too appear in The Times? Not likely. After all, it would not be politically correct to say anything negative about females. CHARLES LLOYD La Jolla
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Bandleader, drummer and NEA jazz master Chico Hamilton has died. He was 92 years old. Born Foreststorn Hamilton in Los Angeles in 1921, Hamilton's music career began with some notable high school classmates including future legends in their own right, Dexter Gordon and Charles Mingus. He eventually went on to perform and tour with Lester Young, Lena Horne and Gerry Mulligan before putting together his first quintet in 1955. A landmark group that forged the sound of West Coast jazz while featuring the reeds of Buddy Collette, guitarist Jim Hall, Carson Smith on bass and cellist Fred Katz , the group evolved through a wealth of jazz talent, including Eric Dolphy, Gabor Szabo and Charles Lloyd, who joined the band in 1960.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Robert Glasper has plenty of people he can call on for guest appearances at his gigs. The jazz pianist's acclaimed 2012 album, “Black Radio,” contains cameos by Erykah Badu, Meshell Ndegeocello and Lupe Fiasco, among others, while a just-released sequel adds Snoop Dogg, Norah Jones and Jill Scott to the mix. Yet Thursday night at the El Rey, where Glasper played the final date of a brief tour in support of “Black Radio 2,” he brought to...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Charles Lloyd was recounting his early days as a musician and the wisdom imparted to him by the late trumpeter Booker Little when he abruptly apologized for drifting off topic. "Pardon me for telling you this story," he said, speaking by phone from his house in the hills above Santa Barbara. "I live in the wilderness, and I don't edit so well. " No apology necessary. The saxophonist, 75, has a built a career on rewarding tangents, building a body of work that's helped shape the sound of jazz from the '60s into the new millennium.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2013 | By Chris Barton
A selection of performances heading into the weekend: Ryan Cohan : Inspired by a trip to Africa, the Chicago-based pianist and bandleader released one of the more ambitious jazz records of the year in "The River. " Rising out of a lush, gospel-infused solo turn and meandering through a buoyant, album-length suite delivered by a nimble seven-piece band, Cohan explores the sounds of Rwanda and Zimbabwe as filtered through the Windy City's fertile jazz scene. Here Cohan performs with a quartet that includes drummer Joe La Barbera and saxophonist Bob Sheppard, but the explorations should remain every bit as inviting.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Chris Barton
By nature, duet recordings are all about limitations, and an exercise in trying to say more with less. This month marked a pair of high-profile recordings between saxophone and keyboard, and the results are as distinctive as they are rewarding. Say what you will about Charles Lloyd, but the guy has exquisite taste in piano players. Over a career that began as a member of Gerald Wilson's band in the '50s, Lloyd has recorded with Herbie Hancock, Keith Jarrett, Brad Mehldau and, in an album-length pairing that coincides with Lloyd's 75th birthday, Jason Moran, who has been part of Lloyd's regular quartet for several years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Though Ben Wendel and Dan Tepfer could be considered newcomers as compared with 75-year-old saxophone master Charles Lloyd (who also recently released a duet album, "Hagar's Song," with pianist Jason Moran), they show as much restless invention on "Small Constructions. " While still a duet, the album lives up to its name with some judicious multi-tracking, allowing Wendel (co-leader of the genre-skipping jazz-rock group Kneebody) to seamlessly switch to melodica and bassoon, such as "Still Play," the opener, and "Gratitude," which expands with a quiet grace.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2008 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Charles Lloyd celebrated his approaching 70th birthday by generously sharing the spotlight Sunday at the Catalina Bar & Grill with the talents of his superb young band.
NEWS
April 19, 1990
Hungry for jazz? Charles Lloyd has a treat set for Saturday at Wheeler Hot Springs in Ojai. The internationally renowned saxophonist/flutist will introduce his new American quartet on the eve of its departure for the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. This performance coincides with the new release, "Fish Out of Water," his first studio-recorded album in more than a decade. Wheeler Hot Springs is at 16825 Maricopa Highway, Ojai. Tickets are $17.50 and seating will begin at 9 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Though Ben Wendel and Dan Tepfer could be considered newcomers as compared with 75-year-old saxophone master Charles Lloyd (who also recently released a duet album, "Hagar's Song," with pianist Jason Moran), they show as much restless invention on "Small Constructions. " While still a duet, the album lives up to its name with some judicious multi-tracking, allowing Wendel (co-leader of the genre-skipping jazz-rock group Kneebody) to seamlessly switch to melodica and bassoon, such as "Still Play," the opener, and "Gratitude," which expands with a quiet grace.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2008 | Don Heckman
Jazz tenor saxophonist Charles Lloyd had a crossover hit in the late '60s with "Forest Flower." A couple of years later, he was on hiatus, meditating at Big Sur, seeking the links between music, spirituality and life. That quest has continued to play a role since his return in the '80s as one of jazz's most imaginative practitioners. He performs Sunday night at Catalina's. YOUR NEW CD, "RABO DE NUBE," IS TITLED AFTER A SONG WRITTEN BY CUBAN COMPOSER SILVIO RODRIGUEZ. HOW DID YOU HAPPEN TO MAKE THAT CHOICE?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Charles Lloyd's music has passed through a shifting sequence of creative phases over his four-decade career. One of the most appealing is traced to his frequent partnership with the late drummer Billy Higgins, whose irrepressible rhythmic energy brought vim and vigor to Lloyd's sometimes distracting tendency to focus on looking inward. In "Lift Every Voice," his only album since Higgins' death in 2001, Lloyd's ruminative qualities seemed an appropriate response to Sept.
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