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Charles Moore

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson
Charles Moore, a photojournalist who both chronicled and helped alter the course of history through extraordinary photographs that reflected the brutal reality of the civil rights movement in the South, has died. He was 79. Moore died Thursday of natural causes at a nursing home in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., said his daughter Michelle Moore Peel. From 1958 to 1965, he trained his lens on the unfolding drama of civil rights as a news photographer for the Montgomery (Ala.) Advertiser and Life magazine.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
"Everything Loose Will Land" has landed. And its timing could hardly be better. The exhibition at the MAK Center in West Hollywood, curated by UCLA architectural historian and critic Sylvia Lavin, is a wry study of the ways Los Angeles artists and architects worked with, leaned on, stole from and influenced one another in the 1970s. In a larger sense, it charts the way Southern California architects threw off the influence of establishmen Modernism and helped remake the profession in that decade.
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NEWS
December 18, 1993 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles Moore, who fought abstraction in architecture, contending that his fellow builders had failed to create environments that give people a sense of place, has died. A spokesman for his Santa Monica-based firm said Moore, 68, died Thursday in Austin, Tex., of a heart attack. He was chairman of the architecture department at the University of Texas and had previously been chairman of the architecture department at UCLA. He also had taught at Yale, Princeton and UC Berkeley.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Margaret Thatcher signed a contract for an authorized biography more than 16 years ago. For reasons that will soon become clear, she granted writer Charles Moore an exclusive series of interviews and access to her papers on the condition that the book would be published only after her death. On Monday, just hours after the former prime minister's death, the Penguin imprint Allen Lane announced that it would publish the first volume of Moore's authorized biography of Thatcher “immediately following her funeral.” “Charles Moore's biography of Margaret Thatcher immediately supersedes all earlier books written about her,” Stuart Profitt, one of the publishing directors of Allen Lane, said in a statement . “Having worked closely with Lady Thatcher on both volumes of her autobiography, and read all the other main books about her, I was astonished at how much Moore says which has never been public before… It gives unparalleled insight into her early life and formation, especially through her extensive correspondence with her sister, which Moore is the first author to draw on.” The British book trade publication the Bookseller says the first volume of the two-volume work will be called “Margaret Thatcher: The Authorized Biography, Volume One: Not for Turning.” It will recount Thatcher's life up to the victory in the 1982 Falklands War. Moore is currently at work on the second volume,  “Herself Alone.” Thatcher published...
NEWS
March 20, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
As the jumbo jet from Cairo descended through the smog toward Los Angeles International Airport, architect Charles Moore looked down on the smudgy urban sprawl of Los Angeles with mixed feelings. Delight and despair battled in his mind as the memory of past pleasures were clouded by the prospect of future disasters.
BOOKS
July 14, 1991 | Kenneth Turan
They seem so far away now, those days of the civil-rights movement, when what needed to be done seemed so clear, and the enemy, like the police dogs of Birmingham, Ala., and their handlers (above) seemed so well-defined. Charles Moore was a free-lance photographer for Life magazine at the time, and his vivid photographs bring back those days with an immediacy that is a shock to the system. An exceptionally fine record of a heroic episode.
REAL ESTATE
March 16, 1986
Sam Hall Kaplan's March 2 column on Charles Moore's lecture at UCLA was a remarkable catalogue of misinformation. It begins by getting the name of the school wrong; the lecture was at the Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Planning. It refers to Charles Moore as "late of UCLA." This will surprise many of his students and colleagues; Charles Moore continues to hold the position of adjunct professor at UCLA, and will teach two important courses here in spring. It tendentiously asserts that Frank Lloyd Wright, Mies van der Rohe, and Le Corbusier never attended architecture school.
SPORTS
January 29, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
  Snowmobiler Caleb Moore remains in critical condition in a Colorado hospital after his snowmobile crash Thursday at the Winter X Games in Aspen. The 25-year-old was performing a flip when he landed short and went over the handlebars. The snowmobile rolled over him. He walked off the course and went to the hospital, where he developed bleeding around his heart. On Sunday, members of his family said he had a secondary complication involving his brain, but did not give details.
SPORTS
January 30, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire, Los Angeles Times
The snowmobile accident that has left Winter X Games competitor Caleb Moore near death in a Colorado hospital renews questions about the lines of risk that sport should cross. Moore, 25, remained in critical condition Tuesday in Grand Junction, Colo., after having failed to convert a flip off a 70-foot ramp with his 450-pound snowmobile in Aspen on Thursday. After completing five tricks, including a midair full-body stretch from the handlebars and a flip around his seat, Moore flew over the handlebars headfirst into the snow after the front skis of his snowmobile dug into a landing ramp.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Margaret Thatcher signed a contract for an authorized biography more than 16 years ago. For reasons that will soon become clear, she granted writer Charles Moore an exclusive series of interviews and access to her papers on the condition that the book would be published only after her death. On Monday, just hours after the former prime minister's death, the Penguin imprint Allen Lane announced that it would publish the first volume of Moore's authorized biography of Thatcher “immediately following her funeral.” “Charles Moore's biography of Margaret Thatcher immediately supersedes all earlier books written about her,” Stuart Profitt, one of the publishing directors of Allen Lane, said in a statement . “Having worked closely with Lady Thatcher on both volumes of her autobiography, and read all the other main books about her, I was astonished at how much Moore says which has never been public before… It gives unparalleled insight into her early life and formation, especially through her extensive correspondence with her sister, which Moore is the first author to draw on.” The British book trade publication the Bookseller says the first volume of the two-volume work will be called “Margaret Thatcher: The Authorized Biography, Volume One: Not for Turning.” It will recount Thatcher's life up to the victory in the 1982 Falklands War. Moore is currently at work on the second volume,  “Herself Alone.” Thatcher published...
SPORTS
January 30, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire, Los Angeles Times
The snowmobile accident that has left Winter X Games competitor Caleb Moore near death in a Colorado hospital renews questions about the lines of risk that sport should cross. Moore, 25, remained in critical condition Tuesday in Grand Junction, Colo., after having failed to convert a flip off a 70-foot ramp with his 450-pound snowmobile in Aspen on Thursday. After completing five tricks, including a midair full-body stretch from the handlebars and a flip around his seat, Moore flew over the handlebars headfirst into the snow after the front skis of his snowmobile dug into a landing ramp.
SPORTS
January 29, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
  Snowmobiler Caleb Moore remains in critical condition in a Colorado hospital after his snowmobile crash Thursday at the Winter X Games in Aspen. The 25-year-old was performing a flip when he landed short and went over the handlebars. The snowmobile rolled over him. He walked off the course and went to the hospital, where he developed bleeding around his heart. On Sunday, members of his family said he had a secondary complication involving his brain, but did not give details.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson
Charles Moore, a photojournalist who both chronicled and helped alter the course of history through extraordinary photographs that reflected the brutal reality of the civil rights movement in the South, has died. He was 79. Moore died Thursday of natural causes at a nursing home in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., said his daughter Michelle Moore Peel. From 1958 to 1965, he trained his lens on the unfolding drama of civil rights as a news photographer for the Montgomery (Ala.) Advertiser and Life magazine.
BOOKS
July 17, 1994 | Brad Leithauser, Brad Leithauser's most recent novel was "Seaward." Knopf will publish his first book of essays, "Penchants and Places," next year
"Water and Architecture" is a big and beguiling volume, equally suited to the coffee table or the library shelf. It traffics in an extensive range of man-made or man-manipulated materials--wood, glass, grass, thatch, plastic, gold, steel, concrete--but ultimately these are a mere flirtation. Its heart lies elsewhere. Its core story revolves around the marriage of two complementary substances: water and stone.
NEWS
December 18, 1993 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles Moore, who fought abstraction in architecture, contending that his fellow builders had failed to create environments that give people a sense of place, has died. A spokesman for his Santa Monica-based firm said Moore, 68, died Thursday in Austin, Tex., of a heart attack. He was chairman of the architecture department at the University of Texas and had previously been chairman of the architecture department at UCLA. He also had taught at Yale, Princeton and UC Berkeley.
BOOKS
July 14, 1991 | Kenneth Turan
They seem so far away now, those days of the civil-rights movement, when what needed to be done seemed so clear, and the enemy, like the police dogs of Birmingham, Ala., and their handlers (above) seemed so well-defined. Charles Moore was a free-lance photographer for Life magazine at the time, and his vivid photographs bring back those days with an immediacy that is a shock to the system. An exceptionally fine record of a heroic episode.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1990 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It sounds like your typical New Age Beverly Hills mansion: ornate Moorish arches, marble countertops imported from Thailand, brass lighting fixtures, inset mahogany bookshelves and a separate children's area literally scaled down to kids' size. That section is the only thing downscale about this building, the new home of the Beverly Hills Public Library. The two-story structure is the latest showpiece of renowned architect Charles Moore.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO
Irving Gill, San Diego's most significant modern architect, left a legacy of innovative buildings in San Diego and Los Angeles when he died in 1936. But while Gill's houses, apartments and public buildings in those two cities are his most famous, the last structures he designed are in Oceanside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1990 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It sounds like your typical New Age Beverly Hills mansion: ornate Moorish arches, marble countertops imported from Thailand, brass lighting fixtures, inset mahogany bookshelves and a separate children's area literally scaled down to kids' size. That section is the only thing downscale about this building, the new home of the Beverly Hills Public Library. The two-story structure is the latest showpiece of renowned architect Charles Moore.
NEWS
March 20, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
As the jumbo jet from Cairo descended through the smog toward Los Angeles International Airport, architect Charles Moore looked down on the smudgy urban sprawl of Los Angeles with mixed feelings. Delight and despair battled in his mind as the memory of past pleasures were clouded by the prospect of future disasters.
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