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Charles Rome Smith

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
Charles Rome Smith has had a recurring nightmare for at least 20 years. It goes like this: He's directing a production of "The Threepenny Opera'--but on opening night, the cast fails to show up. "Talk about being haunted by a production," Smith said. He'll see if his dream comes true Thursday, when his staging of the classic musical by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill opens at Theatre West. This will hardly be Smith's first opening night with "The Threepenny Opera."
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
Charles Rome Smith has had a recurring nightmare for at least 20 years. It goes like this: He's directing a production of "The Threepenny Opera'--but on opening night, the cast fails to show up. "Talk about being haunted by a production," Smith said. He'll see if his dream comes true Thursday, when his staging of the classic musical by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill opens at Theatre West. This will hardly be Smith's first opening night with "The Threepenny Opera."
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1992
Don Shirley's review, "Long Wait for Payoff in 'Next in Line' at New Ivar" (May 18), spends a lot of time criticizing the book. When I first saw and heard a sit-down read-through of the script three months ago, I knew that I wanted to see the drama onstage. Is there a difference between S. L. Stebel and Charles Rome Smith's play and my short stories, published 45 years ago? There is. But stage drama has its own aesthetic demands. Reading a short story is not the same as experiencing the half-fantasy, half-real world of the stage or the totally real medium of films.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1992
Don Shirley's review, "Long Wait for Payoff in 'Next in Line' at New Ivar" (May 18), spends a lot of time criticizing the book. When I first saw and heard a sit-down read-through of the script three months ago, I knew that I wanted to see the drama onstage. Is there a difference between S. L. Stebel and Charles Rome Smith's play and my short stories, published 45 years ago? There is. But stage drama has its own aesthetic demands. Reading a short story is not the same as experiencing the half-fantasy, half-real world of the stage or the totally real medium of films.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2004
The date of the memorial service for theatrical director, producer, writer and actor Charles Rome Smith, originally Sept. 26, has been changed. The service is now planned for 7 p.m. Oct. 8 at Theatre West, 3333 Cahuenga Blvd. West, Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1989
Regarding Martin Bernheimer's criticisms of "The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny," as produced by the Music Center Opera (" 'Mahagonny' Goes Hollywood," Sept. 12): I was the associate producer of the 1970 production of "Mahagonny" in New York with Barbara Harris and Estelle Parsons and gifted producer-director Carmen Capalbo. He too attempted to contemporize certain elements of the opera, which resulted in injunctions, arbitration and talented people calling each other vile names.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
As the program states, Theatre West's wan production of "The Threepenny Opera" is "based on the famous off-Broadway production at New York's Theatre de Lys." The director is Charles Rome Smith, who appeared in that celebrated 1954 sensation. The Marc Blitzstein adaptation of the 1928 landmark work by Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht--well, Brecht and various uncredited collaborators--has since been bettered by other versions in English. But it's still stage-worthy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1999
Theater Geoff Elliott is love-struck Cyrano in A Noise Within's production of the romantic classic "Cyrano de Bergerac," closing Sunday at the Luckman Fine Arts Complex, Cal State Los Angeles. Tonight at 8; Sunday, 2 and 8 p.m. $26 to $30. (818) 546-1924; (323) 224-6420.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2001 | Jana J. Monji
The name Ray Bradbury may conjure up visions of burning books and the colonization of Mars, but the author's "Falling Upward! Or to Eire is Human, to Forbid Divine" at Theatre West in Hollywood isn't a dark futuristic tale. Instead, Bradbury has delivered a gentle yarn, an Irish fable that centers on a particular bar in a small Irish town. Minor events--including a visit from some sun-kissed fairies and a humorous funeral--become greatly enhanced by whimsical storytelling.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1999
* Theater. John Saxon heads the cast in "Talk About Money," Bruce Goldsmith's drama set in the cutthroat world of high finance, opening Oct. 15 at 8 p.m. at the Tiffany Theater, 8532 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood. Playing Thursdays through Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. in an open-end run. $27.50 to $32.50. (310) 289-2999. * Art.
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | Philip Brandes
Theater "Bradbury X 2"--At 81, Ray Bradbury's reverence for the limitless imagination of childhood hasn't dimmed, and that signature theme unites the one-acts paired in "Bradbury X 2" at Theatre West. Adapted by Bradbury from two of his short stories from the 1960s, the pieces showcase different facets of the author's complex personality.
NEWS
August 8, 2002 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Bradbury can spot the sinister impulses lurking in society's shadows, but he's still more attuned to life's affirming power, its unexpected humor and simple joys. These latter qualities suffuse "Bradbury: Past, Present and Future," a trio of genial, almost poetic one-act plays presented by Bradbury's Pandemonium Theatre Company at the Court Theatre. In each story, the premise is easy to guess, and it's a one-joke payoff.
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