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Charles Simic

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BOOKS
August 14, 1994
On his deathbed my father is reading The memoirs of Casanova. I'm watching the night fall, A few windows being lit across the street. In one of them a young woman is reading Close to the glass. She hasn't looked up in a long while, Even with the darkness coming. While there's still a bit of light, I want her to lift her head, So I can see her face Which I have already imagined, But her book must be full of suspense.
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NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Should we write in the nude? That's what Robert McCrum at the Guardian asks. It can, he suggests, get the creativity flowing. Creating while naked is all the rage -- it is, isn't it, if Lady Gaga is doing it? According to an unnamed source in the U.K.'s the Sun , “Gaga has really taken to the idea of naked recording. She has been recording vocals while she's been completely starkers.” Why? “She thinks it makes her voice sound better.” Could being unclothed help all artists make better art?
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BOOKS
July 22, 1990
My mother was a braid of black smoke. She bore me swaddled over the burning cities. The sky was a vast and windy place for a child to play. We met many others who were just like us. They were trying to put on their overcoats with arms made of smoke. The high heavens were full of little shrunken deaf ears instead of stars. The opening stanza of "The World Doesn't End" (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich: $17.95; 74 pp.; 0-15-198575-8), a book-length poem that won the 1990 Pulitzer Prize for poetry.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Kay Ryan, award-winning poet, mountain bike rider and self-described "modern hermit," will soon be going to Washington. The Library of Congress announced today that the lifelong Californian, whose compressed, metaphysical poetry has been compared to Emily Dickinson's, will succeed Charles Simic as the 16th U.S. poet laureate, starting in the fall. The appointment lasts for one year and comes with a $35,000 salary, plus $5,000 for travel, Librarian of Congress James H. Billington said.
BOOKS
March 7, 1999
With the wind gusting so wildly, So unpredictably, I'm willing to bet one or two ants May have tumbled on their backs As we sit here on the porch. Their feet are pedaling Imaginary bicycles. It's a battle of wits against Various physical laws, Plus Fate, plus-- So-what-else-is-new? Wondering if anyone's coming to their aid Bringing cake crumbs, Miniature editions of the Bible, A lost thread or two Cleverly tied end to end. From "Jackstraws" by Charles Simic (Harcourt Brace: 86 pp., $22)
BOOKS
December 7, 1986 | Robert Atwan, Atwan writes on literature and rhetoric, and is series editor of "The Best American Essays" (Ticknor & Fields). and
Randall Jarrell once complained that we live in an Age of Anthology. As a poet, he knew the costs and benefits of this. While anthologies can reach wide audiences and may help introduce and promote a poet's work, they also invariably distort it. Some poets--represented by the same poems over and over again--may even become victims of anthologies, their entire careers permanently frozen in the public mind by one or two selections. Charles Simic is such a poet.
BOOKS
March 16, 1986 | Kenneth Funsten, Funsten's verse appears in "Light Verse ' 86" (Bits Press, Case Western Reserve University). and
At night some understand what the grass says. The grass knows a word or two. It is not much. It repeats the same word Again and again, but not too loudly . . . The best poems by Charles Simic harbor an enigmatic simplicity, contain an evasive weight to them. Influenced by riddles, parables and nursery rhymes, Simic populates the folk world of his poems with simple objects and puzzling omens. His poems have the atmosphere of a Bruegel feast day, without any of the people.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Charles Simic, who learned English as a teenage immigrant, will be the new U.S. poet laureate, the Library of Congress announced Thursday. Simic, who lives in Strafford, N.H., will replace another New Hampshire poet, Donald Hall of Wilmot, who said Thursday he was delighted by Simic's selection. The poet laureate program promotes poetry across the nation.
BOOKS
April 1, 2001 | MEGHAN O' ROURKE, Meghan O'Rourke is an editor at The Tthe New Yorker
Writers' memoirs are a mixed bag: Often, it's less interesting (and less informative) to hear a writer talk about his work than it is to read the work itself, and sometimes we find ourselves reading as much for gossip as for insight.
BOOKS
March 19, 1995 | Christopher Merrill, Christopher Merrill 's most recent book of poetry is "Watch Fire" (White Pine Press)
Where shall we place our faith, in the individual or in the tribe? For Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Charles Simic the answer is a function of poetry itself: "Lyric poets perpetuate the oldest values on earth," he reminds us. "They assert the individual's experience against that of the tribe." Those values, needless to say, are under attack around the world. Religious fundamentalists, ardent nationalists, tribalists of every color and moral suasion--all seek to diminish the worth of individual experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Strafford, N.H. Imagine the new poet laureate of the United States in a blue, short-sleeved linen shirt and blue jeans. He is 69 years old. His neatly cut hair is white and gray. He has the squared jaw of an Eastern European, with a perpetual, almost sly half-smile that moves from left to right up his face. He is standing on his wooden deck by the shores of Bow Lake. He shrugs a lot, as if the answers to all the questions one might ask a poet could be turned back on the interlocutor.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Charles Simic, who learned English as a teenage immigrant from Yugoslavia, will be the new U.S. poet laureate, the Library of Congress announced Thursday. Simic, who lives in Strafford, will succeed another New Hampshire resident, Donald Hall of Wilmot. The poet laureate program promotes poetry across the nation. "I'm overwhelmed," Simic said. Simic taught at the University of New Hampshire for 34 years before moving to emeritus status.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Charles Simic, who learned English as a teenage immigrant, will be the new U.S. poet laureate, the Library of Congress announced Thursday. Simic, who lives in Strafford, N.H., will replace another New Hampshire poet, Donald Hall of Wilmot, who said Thursday he was delighted by Simic's selection. The poet laureate program promotes poetry across the nation.
NEWS
November 28, 2001
Poetry reading--In a calendar listing in Sunday's Book Review, the wrong time was given for a reading by poet Charles Simic. Simic will read today at the Skirball Cultural Center at 7:30 p.m. The center is at 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd.
BOOKS
April 1, 2001 | MEGHAN O' ROURKE, Meghan O'Rourke is an editor at The Tthe New Yorker
Writers' memoirs are a mixed bag: Often, it's less interesting (and less informative) to hear a writer talk about his work than it is to read the work itself, and sometimes we find ourselves reading as much for gossip as for insight.
BOOKS
March 7, 1999
With the wind gusting so wildly, So unpredictably, I'm willing to bet one or two ants May have tumbled on their backs As we sit here on the porch. Their feet are pedaling Imaginary bicycles. It's a battle of wits against Various physical laws, Plus Fate, plus-- So-what-else-is-new? Wondering if anyone's coming to their aid Bringing cake crumbs, Miniature editions of the Bible, A lost thread or two Cleverly tied end to end. From "Jackstraws" by Charles Simic (Harcourt Brace: 86 pp., $22)
BOOKS
October 20, 1996
Happiness, unknown woman, There's a childhood picture Of the two of us, Your hands are covering my eyes, All but your arms are cut off. I always hoped you'll return. I'll be doing nothing in particular, Barely keeping an eye on the person Ahead of me at the checkout counter, When that delicious blindness Will again sweep me off my feet. It's a baffle, I said only yesterday.
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