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Charles W Knapp

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BUSINESS
August 3, 1985
Trafalgar Holdings, a Los Angeles-based investment company controlled by the former chairman of Financial Corp. of America, has agreed to provide $70 million in financing to Bilzerian & Brodovsky, a Sacramento investment partnership that has proposed a $311-million takeover of Cluett, Peabody & Co., the partnership said. The proposal has been rebuffed by Cluett, but the investors said they may make a hostile bid.
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BUSINESS
November 7, 2010 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The gig: Brooke Knapp has been a real estate agent with Sotheby's International Realty, Beverly Hills, for 14 years. Half of an agent team with Drew Mandile, Knapp, 69, has been involved in noteworthy multimillion-dollar deals including the 2002 sale of Owlwood, a former Sony and Cher residence in Holmby Hills, for $35 million. Before joining Sotheby's, Knapp made a name for herself setting aviation speed records. Her flight path: Although surrounded by flying enthusiasts, Knapp was afraid of flying when she started playing a game with herself.
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BUSINESS
October 30, 1986
Knapp, former chairman of Irvine-based Financial Corp. of America, also charged the thrift's current management with securities laws violations. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, seeks $100 million in punitive damages. The suit is a counterclaim against FCA, which sued Knapp after FCA, the parent of American Savings, was sued by shareholders. William Popejoy, FCA chairman, said in a statement that FCA management wouldn't "waste its time" commenting on Knapp's claims.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1995 | F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court Monday threw out a 6 1/2-year prison sentence imposed on Los Angeles financier Charles W. Knapp for defrauding an Arizona thrift, saying it was too harsh a penalty in light of the evidence. The court ordered him to be resentenced. But the U.S.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Convicted financier Charles W. Knapp should be sentenced to nine years in prison and ordered to pay $11.2 million in restitution for defrauding an Arizona thrift in 1988, federal prosecutors urged in court documents filed Monday in Los Angeles. Knapp, a high-flying thrift executive in California during the early 1980s who later tried to build an investment banking empire, was found guilty in July of lying to obtain a $15-million loan from Western Savings & Loan in Phoenix.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Charles W. Knapp Pleads Innocent: Knapp, whose American Savings & Loan was the largest thrift ever to fail, pleaded innocent to charges he defrauded another collapsed S&L by lying to obtain a $15-million unsecured loan that was never repaid. His lawyer insisted that prosecutors are criminalizing what was in effect a character loan to a start-up mortgage banking business. Phoenix-based Western Savings knew all the important financial details about Knapp and the deal, attorney John J. Bartko
BUSINESS
January 1, 1990 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
California's image as a pacesetter held up fairly well in the 1980s in the world of business and economics. Californians were a force for dramatic change. Some achieved change on a grand scale--inspiring a revolution in economic policy or transforming corporate finance. Some of the change may seem minor, but it altered our daily routines and our life styles.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1986
I am the attorney for Charles W. Knapp, former chairman and chief executive of Financial Corp. of America and American Savings & Loan Assn. A number of articles in recent months have referred to litigation against him. The most recent Times article on May 17 referred to the "buy-sell" lawsuit brought against American Savings & Loan by Dudley G. Kirkpatrick, a real estate developer, which is currently being tried in Sacramento Superior Court....
BUSINESS
December 15, 1993 | DAVID W. MYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Securities and Exchange Commission has filed charges against Charles W. Knapp and some of his former business associates, accusing them of taking part in a fraudulent scheme to raise money in the securities market for a Beverly Hills-based bank that eventually failed. The SEC action, filed Monday, was announced Tuesday as Knapp was being sentenced to 6 1/2 years in prison by a Los Angeles federal court for his role in defrauding an Arizona savings and loan.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles W. Knapp, the maverick money man who once headed the nation's largest savings and loan, was sentenced Tuesday to 6 1/2 years in prison for duping an Arizona savings and loan into lending him $15 million. Knapp, 59, was also ordered to pay $11 million in restitution--a sum prosecutors claimed was the amount Western Savings & Loan in Phoenix lost on the Knapp loan. The stiff sentence, handed down by U.S. District Judge Stephen V.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Knapp Sentencing Again Delayed: A federal judge postponed the sentencing of financier Charles W. Knapp to Dec. 14 because of additional legal delays. But Judge Stephen V. Wilson in Los Angeles said he is inclined to sentence Knapp to a prison term of 5 1/4 to 6 1/2 years, rather than the nine-year sentence sought by prosecutors. Knapp's lawyers had asked that he perform community service.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Convicted financier Charles W. Knapp should be sentenced to nine years in prison and ordered to pay $11.2 million in restitution for defrauding an Arizona thrift in 1988, federal prosecutors urged in court documents filed Monday in Los Angeles. Knapp, a high-flying thrift executive in California during the early 1980s who later tried to build an investment banking empire, was found guilty in July of lying to obtain a $15-million loan from Western Savings & Loan in Phoenix.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles W. Knapp, the financier whose business strategies led to the collapse of the nation's largest thrift in the 1980s, was found guilty Wednesday on criminal charges of lying to obtain a loan from a savings and loan in Arizona that later failed. After nearly four days of deliberations, a federal jury in Los Angeles convicted Knapp on two counts of making false statements and one count of conspiracy, but he was acquitted on a third charge of making false statements.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1990 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controversial Los Angeles financier Charles W. Knapp, under siege because of business difficulties, has sued his ex-wife, aviator N. Brooke Knapp, seeking to cancel an expensive divorce settlement that was costing him as much as $40,000 a month. Knapp claimed that he agreed to the divorce settlement in 1986 only because he was "suffering from a severe personality disorder and depression" that left him "exceedingly self-destructive," according to his lawsuit.
NEWS
March 5, 1993 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles W. Knapp--the former Los Angeles banker whose freewheeling ways set the stage for the failure of the nation's largest thrift--was indicted Thursday on charges that he lied to win a $15-million loan from an Arizona savings and loan that also later failed. Knapp--whom regulators forced from his job at Financial Corp.
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