Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCharleston S C
IN THE NEWS

Charleston S C

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Standing before television cameras and with a school bus crushed by a storm-tossed pine tree behind him, President Bush on Friday defended the efforts of the federal government in helping South Carolina rebuild after the devastation of Hurricane Hugo. One week after the storm's 135-m.p.h. winds churned through the state, the President viewed the results during an 80-minute tour of this small city set in forests of pines 20 miles northwest of Charleston.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By David Ng
Los Angeles street artist Shepard Fairey and New York art titan Jasper Johns come from different sides of the country and the contemporary art world, but they are similar in at least one respect: They both hail from South Carolina. The artists will be the subject of a retrospective starting in May in Fairey's hometown of Charleston coinciding with the 2014 Spoleto Festival. The exhibition, "The Insistent Image: Recurrent Motifs in the Art of Shepard Fairey and Jasper Johns," will feature new work by Fairey and a survey of prints by Johns from 1982 to 2012.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
WHERE TO EAT Fig, 232 Meeting St., Charleston; (843) 805-5900, http://www.eatatfig.com . Closed Sunday. Open for dinner Monday-Thursday, 5:30-10:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 5:30-11 p.m. Entrees from $26. Hominy Grill, 207 Rutledge Ave., Charleston; (843) 937-0930, http://www.hominygrill.com . Open for breakfast Monday-Friday, 7:30-11:30 a.m.; lunch/dinner Monday-Friday, 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday brunch, 9 a.m-9 p.m.; dinner specials 3-9 p.m. Sunday brunch, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Brunch entrees from $5.95; lunch and dinner entrees from $7.95.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
WHERE TO EAT Fig, 232 Meeting St., Charleston; (843) 805-5900, http://www.eatatfig.com . Closed Sunday. Open for dinner Monday-Thursday, 5:30-10:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 5:30-11 p.m. Entrees from $26. Hominy Grill, 207 Rutledge Ave., Charleston; (843) 937-0930, http://www.hominygrill.com . Open for breakfast Monday-Friday, 7:30-11:30 a.m.; lunch/dinner Monday-Friday, 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday brunch, 9 a.m-9 p.m.; dinner specials 3-9 p.m. Sunday brunch, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Brunch entrees from $5.95; lunch and dinner entrees from $7.95.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Our waiter was staring at us in disbelief. Finally, he leaned forward and, ever so politely, asked my husband to repeat himself. Although we had just ordered three appetizers, a soup and two main courses (we did eat every bite), my husband was, indeed, inquiring about where we might go later that evening to try more of Charleston's culinary delicacies. Most tourists are drawn to Charleston for its graceful, grand homes and hauntingly beautiful gardens. But an increasing number are going for the food, as the rich and varied cuisine of the region undergoes a renaissance propelled by an interest in locally grown ingredients and an influx of new chefs.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | Associated Press
The Charleston City Council labeled the Ku Klux Klan a terrorist group Tuesday. The resolution, approved by a voice vote, also was amended to condemn any organization "whose purpose is to encourage hate of any individual, race, religion, culture or way of life." Councilman Wendell Gilliard, the resolution's sponsor, had said earlier the goal was to take away the Klan's rights to speak and assemble in the city. There was no specific mention of a ban in the wording.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By David Ng
Los Angeles street artist Shepard Fairey and New York art titan Jasper Johns come from different sides of the country and the contemporary art world, but they are similar in at least one respect: They both hail from South Carolina. The artists will be the subject of a retrospective starting in May in Fairey's hometown of Charleston coinciding with the 2014 Spoleto Festival. The exhibition, "The Insistent Image: Recurrent Motifs in the Art of Shepard Fairey and Jasper Johns," will feature new work by Fairey and a survey of prints by Johns from 1982 to 2012.
NEWS
September 8, 1987 | Associated Press
The gentleness of the residents of Charleston, S.C., makes that city the best-mannered in the United States, says an etiquette expert who includes Pasadena on her Top 10 list. Marjabelle Young Stewart announced her third annual list of the 10 best-mannered cities, based on her own cross-country travels and a poll of about 100 service-industry workers such as taxi drivers and restaurant owners. "Charleston was the runaway winner in the poll," she said. "It's a city of great tradition and charm.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2007 | Richard Fausset and Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writers
When Melvin Champaign decided to join the Charleston Fire Department three years ago, his mother didn't worry for him, even though he was in his 40s and hadn't fought a fire in his life. "He always said he wanted to make something of himself, instead of going to work at McDonald's," said Stella Ragin, 72. "I put him in God's hands -- I said, 'Let His will be done.'
SPORTS
June 30, 2009 | Mario Aguirre
AT CHARLESTON BATTERY When: 4:30 PDT. Where: Blackbaud Stadium in Charleston, S.C. On the air: Webcast, usllive.com. Update: After finishing SuperLiga last weekend without a win, Chivas USA travels to South Carolina to face the Charleston Battery of the USL in the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup. Chivas has not won a match in the U.S. Open Cup since 2005. The winner of tonight's match advances to the quarterfinals of the tournament. Last year, the Battery lost, 2-1, in the title game against D.C.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Our waiter was staring at us in disbelief. Finally, he leaned forward and, ever so politely, asked my husband to repeat himself. Although we had just ordered three appetizers, a soup and two main courses (we did eat every bite), my husband was, indeed, inquiring about where we might go later that evening to try more of Charleston's culinary delicacies. Most tourists are drawn to Charleston for its graceful, grand homes and hauntingly beautiful gardens. But an increasing number are going for the food, as the rich and varied cuisine of the region undergoes a renaissance propelled by an interest in locally grown ingredients and an influx of new chefs.
SPORTS
June 30, 2009 | Mario Aguirre
AT CHARLESTON BATTERY When: 4:30 PDT. Where: Blackbaud Stadium in Charleston, S.C. On the air: Webcast, usllive.com. Update: After finishing SuperLiga last weekend without a win, Chivas USA travels to South Carolina to face the Charleston Battery of the USL in the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup. Chivas has not won a match in the U.S. Open Cup since 2005. The winner of tonight's match advances to the quarterfinals of the tournament. Last year, the Battery lost, 2-1, in the title game against D.C.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2009 | Associated Press
Regulators seized two more banks Friday, raising the number of bank failures this year to 23. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. took over Cape Fear Bank in Wilmington, N.C., and New Frontier Bank in Greeley, Colo., after state regulators closed them down. The FDIC sold Cape Fear Bank to First Federal Savings & Loan Assn. of Charleston, S.C. The agency failed to sell New Frontier, and will keep it open for 30 days so customers can open accounts elsewhere.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2007 | Richard Fausset and Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writers
When Melvin Champaign decided to join the Charleston Fire Department three years ago, his mother didn't worry for him, even though he was in his 40s and hadn't fought a fire in his life. "He always said he wanted to make something of himself, instead of going to work at McDonald's," said Stella Ragin, 72. "I put him in God's hands -- I said, 'Let His will be done.'
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | Associated Press
The Charleston City Council labeled the Ku Klux Klan a terrorist group Tuesday. The resolution, approved by a voice vote, also was amended to condemn any organization "whose purpose is to encourage hate of any individual, race, religion, culture or way of life." Councilman Wendell Gilliard, the resolution's sponsor, had said earlier the goal was to take away the Klan's rights to speak and assemble in the city. There was no specific mention of a ban in the wording.
NEWS
July 12, 1997 | BARRY SIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It began with small hand-printed signs, posted now and then at the foot of the bridge joining this unruly South Carolina sea island to the mainland city of Charleston. Come to a meeting at the high school, the signs invited. Come help the new James Island Residential Assn. Bill "Cubby" Wilder saw one of those signs. He went to a meeting, then told others what was up. Eventually, Ron Middleton grew interested.
NEWS
October 14, 1994 | From Associated Press
Flooding from at least 14 inches of rain in two days closed streets and schools Thursday and forced the evacuation of about 200 homes. In downtown Savannah, children played in streets where floodwaters began to recede after rising to five feet. Children rode their bicycles into the water, and a group of about eight played on a fishing boat. "We're having fun for once," said 12-year-old Kelly Pringle. Adults had a different view.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | BRUCE SMITH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Anchored in the summer haze off Ft. Sumter where the Civil War began, the 500-foot Kapetan Martinovic and its stranded crew are a monument of sorts to the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The orange-and-black freighter is one of seven ships detained last year when the federal government froze $450 million in former Yugoslav assets. Since last fall, it has been rusting at anchor. "We don't know when we will leave with this crazy war in the old Yugoslavia," said Luka Brguljan, the ship's captain.
NEWS
October 14, 1994 | From Associated Press
Flooding from at least 14 inches of rain in two days closed streets and schools Thursday and forced the evacuation of about 200 homes. In downtown Savannah, children played in streets where floodwaters began to recede after rising to five feet. Children rode their bicycles into the water, and a group of about eight played on a fishing boat. "We're having fun for once," said 12-year-old Kelly Pringle. Adults had a different view.
NEWS
August 1, 1993 | BRUCE SMITH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Anchored in the summer haze off Ft. Sumter where the Civil War began, the 500-foot Kapetan Martinovic and its stranded crew are a monument of sorts to the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The orange-and-black freighter is one of seven ships detained last year when the federal government froze $450 million in former Yugoslav assets. Since last fall, it has been rusting at anchor. "We don't know when we will leave with this crazy war in the old Yugoslavia," said Luka Brguljan, the ship's captain.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|