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NEWS
September 23, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Less than half a mile of Intracoastal Waterway lies between the South Carolina mainland and its beachfront neighbors here, Sullivans Island and the Isle of Palms. But, in the aftermath of Hurricane Hugo on Friday, that gulf had come to seem enormous. Across the water lay the hint of disaster: Nowhere had the mighty storm struck with such devastating force. Up to 20 citizens who had defied orders and waited out the storm on the oceanfront could be in grave peril. No one knew their fate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By David Ng
Los Angeles street artist Shepard Fairey and New York art titan Jasper Johns come from different sides of the country and the contemporary art world, but they are similar in at least one respect: They both hail from South Carolina. The artists will be the subject of a retrospective starting in May in Fairey's hometown of Charleston coinciding with the 2014 Spoleto Festival. The exhibition, "The Insistent Image: Recurrent Motifs in the Art of Shepard Fairey and Jasper Johns," will feature new work by Fairey and a survey of prints by Johns from 1982 to 2012.
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NEWS
September 8, 1987 | Associated Press
The gentleness of the residents of Charleston, S.C., makes that city the best-mannered in the United States, says an etiquette expert who includes Pasadena on her Top 10 list. Marjabelle Young Stewart announced her third annual list of the 10 best-mannered cities, based on her own cross-country travels and a poll of about 100 service-industry workers such as taxi drivers and restaurant owners. "Charleston was the runaway winner in the poll," she said. "It's a city of great tradition and charm.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
WHERE TO EAT Fig, 232 Meeting St., Charleston; (843) 805-5900, http://www.eatatfig.com . Closed Sunday. Open for dinner Monday-Thursday, 5:30-10:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 5:30-11 p.m. Entrees from $26. Hominy Grill, 207 Rutledge Ave., Charleston; (843) 937-0930, http://www.hominygrill.com . Open for breakfast Monday-Friday, 7:30-11:30 a.m.; lunch/dinner Monday-Friday, 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday brunch, 9 a.m-9 p.m.; dinner specials 3-9 p.m. Sunday brunch, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Brunch entrees from $5.95; lunch and dinner entrees from $7.95.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2007 | Richard Fausset and Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writers
When Melvin Champaign decided to join the Charleston Fire Department three years ago, his mother didn't worry for him, even though he was in his 40s and hadn't fought a fire in his life. "He always said he wanted to make something of himself, instead of going to work at McDonald's," said Stella Ragin, 72. "I put him in God's hands -- I said, 'Let His will be done.'
TRAVEL
January 21, 2001 | PRISCILLA LISTER, Priscilla Lister is a freelance writer in San Diego
Year-round, people come from all over the world to walk Charleston's old streets and admire the fastidiously preserved architecture. The oldest residences were built by planters in the 1700s and 1800s as their in-town homes and by the merchants and others who shared in the wealth of the colony's rice (and, later, cotton) trade. In size, design and decoration, each home announced its owner's wealth and status. They still do.
NEWS
October 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
When it's all counted up, the damage from Hurricane Hugo may exceed $8 billion, the director of the National Hurricane Center said Thursday. Robert Sheets said the insurance industry is currently estimating its losses at $4 billion. "In the past we have found that total losses get close to two to three times the insurance loss," he told the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Although they are a continent apart, the cities of Charleston, S.C., and San Francisco now share a fateful page in the ledger of time. They are the scenes of two of the century's costliest, back-to-back natural disasters: Hurricane Hugo and the Bay Area earthquake.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Two of America's richest people--along with some of the nation's biggest corporations--pitched in to help the relief effort in Charleston, S.C., in the wake of Hurricane Hugo, local officials said Monday. Grateful local leaders said the private sector aid has been crucial in a battered city that remains without power long after Hugo's passing.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Our waiter was staring at us in disbelief. Finally, he leaned forward and, ever so politely, asked my husband to repeat himself. Although we had just ordered three appetizers, a soup and two main courses (we did eat every bite), my husband was, indeed, inquiring about where we might go later that evening to try more of Charleston's culinary delicacies. Most tourists are drawn to Charleston for its graceful, grand homes and hauntingly beautiful gardens. But an increasing number are going for the food, as the rich and varied cuisine of the region undergoes a renaissance propelled by an interest in locally grown ingredients and an influx of new chefs.
SPORTS
June 30, 2009 | Mario Aguirre
AT CHARLESTON BATTERY When: 4:30 PDT. Where: Blackbaud Stadium in Charleston, S.C. On the air: Webcast, usllive.com. Update: After finishing SuperLiga last weekend without a win, Chivas USA travels to South Carolina to face the Charleston Battery of the USL in the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup. Chivas has not won a match in the U.S. Open Cup since 2005. The winner of tonight's match advances to the quarterfinals of the tournament. Last year, the Battery lost, 2-1, in the title game against D.C.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2009 | Associated Press
Regulators seized two more banks Friday, raising the number of bank failures this year to 23. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. took over Cape Fear Bank in Wilmington, N.C., and New Frontier Bank in Greeley, Colo., after state regulators closed them down. The FDIC sold Cape Fear Bank to First Federal Savings & Loan Assn. of Charleston, S.C. The agency failed to sell New Frontier, and will keep it open for 30 days so customers can open accounts elsewhere.
NATIONAL
June 23, 2007 | Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writer
Joined by thousands of firefighters from across the country, this grieving region bade farewell to "our dear heroes" Friday morning and struggled to find meaning in the deaths of nine men who battled a furniture store blaze this week. "Firefighters charge into dangerous places when the natural human instinct is to flee rapidly," marveled Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley Jr., whose city suffered the worst loss of American firefighters in a single event since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2007 | Richard Fausset and Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writers
When Melvin Champaign decided to join the Charleston Fire Department three years ago, his mother didn't worry for him, even though he was in his 40s and hadn't fought a fire in his life. "He always said he wanted to make something of himself, instead of going to work at McDonald's," said Stella Ragin, 72. "I put him in God's hands -- I said, 'Let His will be done.'
TRAVEL
July 30, 2006 | Robin Rauzi, Times Staff Writer
WHEN George and Ira Gershwin were adapting DuBose Heyward's novel into the opera "Porgy and Bess," they decamped to the Charleston area in the summer of 1934. They got very little done. Summertime ... and the living is easy, in a desultory kind of way. With temperatures and humidity in the high 80s, you're forced to slow to a saunter. And that, it turns out, is the most appropriate pace to take in and fully appreciate Charleston's residential lanes, pastel-colored row houses and hidden gardens.
TRAVEL
July 30, 2006 | Robin Rauzi, Times Staff Writer
WHEN George and Ira Gershwin were adapting DuBose Heyward's novel into the opera "Porgy and Bess," they decamped to the Charleston area in the summer of 1934. They got very little done. Summertime ... and the living is easy, in a desultory kind of way. With temperatures and humidity in the high 80s, you're forced to slow to a saunter. And that, it turns out, is the most appropriate pace to take in and fully appreciate Charleston's residential lanes, pastel-colored row houses and hidden gardens.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and DOUG JEHL, Times Staff Writers
This historic old city was a shambles Friday, battered and rent by a malign wind. Hurricane Hugo made a direct hit on Charleston. It had plenty of muscle left to wallop other places for hundreds of miles. The sorting began--who was accounted for and who was not, what stood safely and what had surrendered. The gloomy arithmetic will go on for weeks. At least 11 were dead in South Carolina and one in North Carolina.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2004 | Ellen Barry, Times Staff Writer
Wearing ragged beards and motorcycle jackets, cartridge boxes and frock coats, rebel-flag T-shirts and white cotton gloves, about 20,000 mourners poured into Charleston from across the South on Saturday to bury the remains of eight drowned Confederate sailors -- perhaps the final funeral of the Civil War. The burial marked an end to the mystery of the H.L. Hunley, a hand-cranked submarine fashioned out of a steam boiler. On the night of Feb.
TRAVEL
November 3, 2002
Generations of writers have been inspired by the sweeping beaches and savannas of Charleston and the Low Country. Others have been drawn by the city's arts community and the architecture of its restored historic district. A sampling: Dubose Heyward: A Charleston native, Heyward drew on his fascination with his city's history and the Gullah culture in writing "Porgy," the story of a Catfish Row beggar.
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