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NEWS
September 23, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Less than half a mile of Intracoastal Waterway lies between the South Carolina mainland and its beachfront neighbors here, Sullivans Island and the Isle of Palms. But, in the aftermath of Hurricane Hugo on Friday, that gulf had come to seem enormous. Across the water lay the hint of disaster: Nowhere had the mighty storm struck with such devastating force. Up to 20 citizens who had defied orders and waited out the storm on the oceanfront could be in grave peril. No one knew their fate.
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TRAVEL
April 11, 2014
If you go THE BEST WAY TO CHARLESTON, S.C. From LAX , American, Delta, JetBlue, United, US Airways and Southwest offer connecting service (change of planes) to Charleston. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $327, including all taxes and fees. WHERE TO STAY Belmond Charleston Place, 205 Meeting St., (843) 722-4900, http://www.charlestonplace.com . Part of the luxury group once known as Orient Express and now known as Belmond (Santa Barbara's El Encanto is part of the group)
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NATIONAL
June 20, 2007 | Richard Fausset and Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writers
When Melvin Champaign decided to join the Charleston Fire Department three years ago, his mother didn't worry for him, even though he was in his 40s and hadn't fought a fire in his life. "He always said he wanted to make something of himself, instead of going to work at McDonald's," said Stella Ragin, 72. "I put him in God's hands -- I said, 'Let His will be done.'
TRAVEL
April 11, 2014 | By Alice Short
CHARLESTON, S.C. - Two of the top destinations on a recent trip to Charleston - Ft. Sumter and the Confederacy's H. L. Hunley submarine - transcend the label of "Civil War attraction. " These sites appeal to students of U.S. history, to devotees of military archives and to those who value peace over war. After a 30-minute ferry trip from the city to the man-made island that is the site of Ft. Sumter, my tour group encountered park ranger Dennis Birr, who proved to be a combination of historian, carnival barker and motivational speaker.
NEWS
October 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
When it's all counted up, the damage from Hurricane Hugo may exceed $8 billion, the director of the National Hurricane Center said Thursday. Robert Sheets said the insurance industry is currently estimating its losses at $4 billion. "In the past we have found that total losses get close to two to three times the insurance loss," he told the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation.
NEWS
October 23, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Although they are a continent apart, the cities of Charleston, S.C., and San Francisco now share a fateful page in the ledger of time. They are the scenes of two of the century's costliest, back-to-back natural disasters: Hurricane Hugo and the Bay Area earthquake.
NEWS
September 26, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Two of America's richest people--along with some of the nation's biggest corporations--pitched in to help the relief effort in Charleston, S.C., in the wake of Hurricane Hugo, local officials said Monday. Grateful local leaders said the private sector aid has been crucial in a battered city that remains without power long after Hugo's passing.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and DOUG JEHL, Times Staff Writers
This historic old city was a shambles Friday, battered and rent by a malign wind. Hurricane Hugo made a direct hit on Charleston. It had plenty of muscle left to wallop other places for hundreds of miles. The sorting began--who was accounted for and who was not, what stood safely and what had surrendered. The gloomy arithmetic will go on for weeks. At least 11 were dead in South Carolina and one in North Carolina.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | LARRY GREEN and DOUG JEHL, Times Staff Writers
The people of the Carolinas, brought to ruin by Hurricane Hugo, jury-rigged their lives back together with pluck and ingenuity Saturday as the storm sputtered north, lost its punch as well as its name--and shut its evil eye for good. National Guardsmen by the hundreds patrolled streets. Police arrested at least 119 people for pillaging and breaking curfew. Authorities counted 18 dead in the Carolinas, two in Virginia and one in New York--bringing Hugo's weeklong toll to at least 48.
TRAVEL
April 11, 2014 | By Alice Short
CHARLESTON, S.C. - When the email proposing a business meeting in Charleston popped up, it took all of three seconds to say yes. I'd never been to South Carolina, but I've read glowing dispatches from friends and colleagues for years. Southern hospitality is not a myth, they insisted, as they extolled the beauty of the area and its vigorous dining and bar scene. When I started to research this coastal city, it was its Civil War-era attractions that proved most compelling. After all, the war "started" here when Confederate forces forced Union troops from Ft. Sumter in April 1861.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By David Ng
Los Angeles street artist Shepard Fairey and New York art titan Jasper Johns come from different sides of the country and the contemporary art world, but they are similar in at least one respect: They both hail from South Carolina. The artists will be the subject of a retrospective starting in May in Fairey's hometown of Charleston coinciding with the 2014 Spoleto Festival. The exhibition, "The Insistent Image: Recurrent Motifs in the Art of Shepard Fairey and Jasper Johns," will feature new work by Fairey and a survey of prints by Johns from 1982 to 2012.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
WHERE TO EAT Fig, 232 Meeting St., Charleston; (843) 805-5900, http://www.eatatfig.com . Closed Sunday. Open for dinner Monday-Thursday, 5:30-10:30 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 5:30-11 p.m. Entrees from $26. Hominy Grill, 207 Rutledge Ave., Charleston; (843) 937-0930, http://www.hominygrill.com . Open for breakfast Monday-Friday, 7:30-11:30 a.m.; lunch/dinner Monday-Friday, 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday brunch, 9 a.m-9 p.m.; dinner specials 3-9 p.m. Sunday brunch, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Brunch entrees from $5.95; lunch and dinner entrees from $7.95.
TRAVEL
September 12, 2010 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Our waiter was staring at us in disbelief. Finally, he leaned forward and, ever so politely, asked my husband to repeat himself. Although we had just ordered three appetizers, a soup and two main courses (we did eat every bite), my husband was, indeed, inquiring about where we might go later that evening to try more of Charleston's culinary delicacies. Most tourists are drawn to Charleston for its graceful, grand homes and hauntingly beautiful gardens. But an increasing number are going for the food, as the rich and varied cuisine of the region undergoes a renaissance propelled by an interest in locally grown ingredients and an influx of new chefs.
SPORTS
June 30, 2009 | Mario Aguirre
AT CHARLESTON BATTERY When: 4:30 PDT. Where: Blackbaud Stadium in Charleston, S.C. On the air: Webcast, usllive.com. Update: After finishing SuperLiga last weekend without a win, Chivas USA travels to South Carolina to face the Charleston Battery of the USL in the Lamar Hunt U.S. Open Cup. Chivas has not won a match in the U.S. Open Cup since 2005. The winner of tonight's match advances to the quarterfinals of the tournament. Last year, the Battery lost, 2-1, in the title game against D.C.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2009 | Associated Press
Regulators seized two more banks Friday, raising the number of bank failures this year to 23. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. took over Cape Fear Bank in Wilmington, N.C., and New Frontier Bank in Greeley, Colo., after state regulators closed them down. The FDIC sold Cape Fear Bank to First Federal Savings & Loan Assn. of Charleston, S.C. The agency failed to sell New Frontier, and will keep it open for 30 days so customers can open accounts elsewhere.
TRAVEL
November 3, 2002 | Emilie C. Harting, Special to The Times
"This is the writers' city, isn't it? You know, that novel 'Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil,' " whispered the woman standing next to me. She had just stepped off the bus at Charleston Place, the departure and arrival point for many tours of this evocative Old South port. "That's Savannah," I said, correcting her. "We're in Charleston. But this is also a writers' city. "Walking around the historic district is like reading a Southern novel," I told the woman.
NEWS
October 2, 1989
Rain soaked the debris-strewn streets of Charleston, but survivors of the coastal city ravaged by Hurricane Hugo banded together to give thanks for life. Morris Street Baptist Church, as in many areas of the city, remained without power 10 days after Hugo's 135-m.p.h. winds hit, but Sunday school and services were held in the natural light from windows. The Rev. Jesse Jackson, a South Carolina native, visited the church and met a caravan of trucks with supplies from Washington, D.C.
NATIONAL
June 23, 2007 | Maria L. La Ganga, Times Staff Writer
Joined by thousands of firefighters from across the country, this grieving region bade farewell to "our dear heroes" Friday morning and struggled to find meaning in the deaths of nine men who battled a furniture store blaze this week. "Firefighters charge into dangerous places when the natural human instinct is to flee rapidly," marveled Charleston Mayor Joseph P. Riley Jr., whose city suffered the worst loss of American firefighters in a single event since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2007 | Richard Fausset and Jenny Jarvie, Times Staff Writers
When Melvin Champaign decided to join the Charleston Fire Department three years ago, his mother didn't worry for him, even though he was in his 40s and hadn't fought a fire in his life. "He always said he wanted to make something of himself, instead of going to work at McDonald's," said Stella Ragin, 72. "I put him in God's hands -- I said, 'Let His will be done.'
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