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Charlie Kaufman

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
I don't have much use for Hollywood. After more than two decades in Southern California, I've developed a healthy resistance (resentment?) toward the notion that our entire culture can, or should, be interpreted through the filter of the entertainment industry. And yet, even I was excited yesterday by the news that there might be a Charlie Kaufman adaptation of Kurt Vonnegut's 1969 novel “Slaughterhouse-Five” in the works - if director Guillermo del Toro can figure out a way to get it done.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
Amazon announced Thursday that users of its new fan-fiction platform, Kindle Worlds, will be free to run wild with the characters from Kurt Vonnegut's books, including "Cat's Cradle" and "Slaughterhouse-Five," starting this month. Kindle Worlds launched this spring as a fan-fiction hub for writers to self-publish stories online based on existing works and characters. The idea is that authors of the fan fiction will get up to 35% of net revenue for the books, available in the Kindle Store, while the other 65% will go to Amazon and the original copyright owner.
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MAGAZINE
June 11, 2006
David L. Ulin sidesteps the importance of the third act in movies ("Why Charlie Kaufman Is Us," May 14). Movies are an accelerated form of narrative, so without a strong closing, the entire clothesline of ideas collapses. Kaufman is masterful at ideas, but an emperor with no "close." He is in good company. In an era of "The Towering Inferno" and "The Poseidon Adventure," Woody Allen's operatic neuroses were hailed as comic genius. At a time of inoffensive Dan Fogelberg ballads, Michael Jackson's overcooked obsessions thrilled music fans worldwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
I don't have much use for Hollywood. After more than two decades in Southern California, I've developed a healthy resistance (resentment?) toward the notion that our entire culture can, or should, be interpreted through the filter of the entertainment industry. And yet, even I was excited yesterday by the news that there might be a Charlie Kaufman adaptation of Kurt Vonnegut's 1969 novel “Slaughterhouse-Five” in the works - if director Guillermo del Toro can figure out a way to get it done.
MAGAZINE
June 4, 2006
I'm a fan of the intriguing scripts of Charlie Kaufman, but I have to object to his full-blown egomania regarding Susan Orlean's "The Orchid Thief" ("Why Charlie Kaufman Is Us," by David Ulin, May 14). Poor Ms. Orlean, who seemed to have been pressured by the producers of the film to put up with the total transmogrification of her book in order to placate Kaufman and director Spike Jonze following the success of "Being John Malkovich." Putting aside the quality of the film "Adaptation," the idea of Kaufman shredding a fellow writer's work because he was unable to adapt it without turning it into a story about himself reeks of shameless self-absorption.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2005 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Charlie Kaufman -- who has written the screenplays for such merrily mind-bending films as "Being John Malkovich," "Adaptation" and "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" -- isn't so much a trickster as a hide-and-seek artist. His films, however odd their premise may seem at first, are never about getting lost but about being found. They are not mysteries but anti-mysteries. The pleasure they are meant to give is in their explanations. You don't get fleeting clues but fleets of clues.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2004 | James Verini, Special to The Times
On Page 38 of Charlie Kaufman's script for "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" -- which is to say, about a third of the way through the new film "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" -- the following line of dialogue appears: JOEL I'm in my head already, aren't I? There are few employed screenwriters who could get away with that line, even fewer who could get a laugh with that line, and fewer still who could, at the same time, make it a terrifying, genuine, wiltingly beautiful line.
MAGAZINE
May 14, 2006 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is The Times' book editor and the author of "The Myth of Solid Ground."
It's Charlie Kaufman's world. We just live in it. The day after I first saw Kaufman's movie "Adaptation," my wife and I took our daughter to a birthday party. It was mid-December, an afternoon of flat white sunlight, washed out in that Southern California winter way. At the door, a tangle of balloons announced the festivities in orange and blue and red.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2008 | Rachel Abramowitz, Abramowitz is a Times staff writer.
Charlie Kaufman, a diminutive 50-year-old screenwriter with a thatch of uneven curly hair, is all but swathed in existential terror. He's in the midst of barnstorming the world, promoting his long-awaited directorial debut, "Synecdoche, New York," a rite of passage somewhat akin to a root canal for the famously shy auteur.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2003 | Dennis Palumbo, Special to The Times
The funniest line in "Adaptation," the still-resonating black comedy starring Nicolas Cage as tormented screenwriter Charlie Kaufman, isn't in the movie. It's in the film's press kit. As the now-familiar story goes, Kaufman, an Oscar nominee for his screenplay for "Being John Malkovich," was hired to adapt Susan Orlean's nonfiction book "The Orchid Thief" to the screen. Yet, despite his previous success, the production notes explain, Kaufman was still "plagued by insecurities."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2012 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
One of the greatest first films in all of American cinema, "Being John Malkovich" (1999) introduced audiences to Spike Jonze and Charlie Kaufman, two of the most distinctive voices in contemporary movies. A mad scramble of surrealist tropes and philosophical ideas, it marked the acme of Hollywood's passing interest in existentialist postmodernism, which manifested itself through the '90s in such meta-movies as"Groundhog Day,""The Truman Show" and"The Matrix. " Thirteen years on, "Being John Malkovich" - which the Criterion Collection is releasing on DVD andBlu-raythis week - has lost none of its lunatic charm.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2009 | Laura Bleiberg
Ballet -- being a part of the natural world -- evolves according to a Darwinian scheme like everything else. One has worried aplenty, sitting in a dark theater, if what we used to call classical dance hadn't gone right off the rails and belly-flopped into the muck with the creatures that refuse to get up and walk. Trey McIntyre Project restored some faith during its debut performance Saturday at Cal State Los Angeles' Luckman Theater. Kansas native McIntyre, who cut his choreographic teeth with many years at Houston Ballet, approaches choreography with a vacuum cleaner-like equanimity.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2008 | Rachel Abramowitz, Abramowitz is a Times staff writer.
Charlie Kaufman, a diminutive 50-year-old screenwriter with a thatch of uneven curly hair, is all but swathed in existential terror. He's in the midst of barnstorming the world, promoting his long-awaited directorial debut, "Synecdoche, New York," a rite of passage somewhat akin to a root canal for the famously shy auteur.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2008 | CARINA CHOCANO, MOVIE CRITIC
"Synecdoche, New York," screenwriter Charlie Kaufman's wildly ambitious directorial debut, recalls the Jorge Luis Borges story in which the imperial cartographers make a map of the empire so detailed and true-to-life that it takes on the exact dimensions of the territory and ends up covering it entirely.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2008 | Denise Martin
Charlie Kaufman fans can at last talk about: "Synecdoche, New York." The screenwriter's directorial debut, about a playwright (Philip Seymour Hoffman) whose personal life bleeds into his work and vice versa, premiered earlier this year at the Cannes Film Festival to positive if cautioning reviews. You either enjoy awesome mind puzzles or you don't. (Friday) You could also talk about -- or to: Kaufman's collaborator, director Michel Gondry.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
United Talent Agency named partners Tracey Jacobs and David Kramer to its board of directors. Jacobs is co-head of the talent department and represents actors including Johnny Depp and Harrison Ford. Kramer is a motion picture literary agent whose clients include screenwriters Charlie Kaufman and John August.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2003
Dennis Palumbo is so gracious in licensing Charlie Kaufman's self-indulgent solution to writer's block while attempting to adapt "The Orchid Thief" into "Adaptation" ("A Few Issues to Work Through," Jan. 12). We should all be glad that Kaufman didn't receive the assignment for "The Hours," or for that matter, "Mrs. Dalloway." Jim Metzler Culver City
BUSINESS
May 29, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
United Talent Agency named partners Tracey Jacobs and David Kramer to its board of directors. Jacobs is co-head of the talent department and represents actors including Johnny Depp and Harrison Ford. Kramer is a motion picture literary agent whose clients include screenwriters Charlie Kaufman and John August.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2006 | Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times
Scriptland, launching today, is a new weekly feature on the work and professional lives of screenwriters. * I have the new Charlie Kaufman screenplay on my desk. I've read it -- no, lived it. I've been moved and astounded by it. And I'm tortured by the dilemma of what I should or should not say about it here. I feel a bit like Frodo palming the One Ring.
MAGAZINE
June 11, 2006
David L. Ulin sidesteps the importance of the third act in movies ("Why Charlie Kaufman Is Us," May 14). Movies are an accelerated form of narrative, so without a strong closing, the entire clothesline of ideas collapses. Kaufman is masterful at ideas, but an emperor with no "close." He is in good company. In an era of "The Towering Inferno" and "The Poseidon Adventure," Woody Allen's operatic neuroses were hailed as comic genius. At a time of inoffensive Dan Fogelberg ballads, Michael Jackson's overcooked obsessions thrilled music fans worldwide.
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