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Charlie Tuna

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1998 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can a man who spent the 1960s peddling revolution on the radio find happiness peddling nostalgia there in the '90s? If his name is Charlie Tuna, he can. Well, actually his name is Art Ferguson; he just goes by Charlie Tuna. But we'll get to that later. The point is, after successfully working a dozen disparate formats, from country to contemporary and from talk to Top 40, why should Tuna flounder in his latest role playing big band and swing records for KLAC-AM (570)?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2005 | From the Washington Post
Tom Rogers, a retired advertising copywriter whose beret- and sunglasses-wearing hipster tuna became an icon of pop culture, died June 24 in Charlottesville, Va., where he lived with his son's family. The 87-year-old Rogers drowned while swimming alone in the family's backyard pool. Charlie the Tuna was the likably obtuse deep-sea striver who never lived up to the taste standards of Starkist Tuna. ("Sorry, Charlie. Starkist wants tuna that tastes good, not tuna with good taste."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1993 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Claudia Puig is a Times staff writer
The year was 1966. A late-night call came in to the switchboard at KHJ-AM, Los Angeles' powerhouse rock 'n' roll station. On the line was Brian Wilson, the creative force behind the Beach Boys, the local surf band that had already attained superstar status. He was calling from the recording studio where he had just finished cutting the seminal rock record "Good Vibrations." Did KHJ want to be the first to play it? "Bands would cut a record on Tuesday, and Wednesday they'd give us a tape," recalled former KHJ deejay Charlie Tuna.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1998 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can a man who spent the 1960s peddling revolution on the radio find happiness peddling nostalgia there in the '90s? If his name is Charlie Tuna, he can. Well, actually his name is Art Ferguson; he just goes by Charlie Tuna. But we'll get to that later. The point is, after successfully working a dozen disparate formats, from country to contemporary and from talk to Top 40, why should Tuna flounder in his latest role playing big band and swing records for KLAC-AM (570)?
SPORTS
October 8, 1993 | LARRY STEWART
Radio station KMPC, seeking to boost sagging ratings, has hired longtime Los Angeles radio personality Charlie Tuna to serve as host of the station's morning show. Beginning Monday, Tuna will replace Fred Wallin and Paola Boivin, who will both remain at the station on a part-time basis. KMPC also is bringing back Brian Golden and Doug Krikorian full time beginning Monday. They will work together as co-hosts of the midday show, replacing Tony Femino, who will move to weekends.
SPORTS
October 15, 1993 | LARRY STEWART
Charlie Tuna has been going around all week saying, "I've died and gone to radio heaven." He is ecstatic about his new job as the morning host at radio station KMPC, and station management is equally pleased. Tuna is just what the doctor ordered. He is pleasant, upbeat, professional, and with his 26 years in Los Angeles radio, brings credibility to a station that has had declining ratings ever since switching to an all-sports format 1 1/2 years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2005 | From the Washington Post
Tom Rogers, a retired advertising copywriter whose beret- and sunglasses-wearing hipster tuna became an icon of pop culture, died June 24 in Charlottesville, Va., where he lived with his son's family. The 87-year-old Rogers drowned while swimming alone in the family's backyard pool. Charlie the Tuna was the likably obtuse deep-sea striver who never lived up to the taste standards of Starkist Tuna. ("Sorry, Charlie. Starkist wants tuna that tastes good, not tuna with good taste."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Before becoming a widely lauded songwriter, Jimmy Webb was just another aspiring musician living in a dingy Los Angeles apartment. The Oklahoma transplant would wander from his low-rent flat in Silver Lake to a place that would inspire one of his most indelible hits, MacArthur Park. There, between Wilshire and 7th, he'd wait for his girlfriend to get off work from her job nearby. "I used to eat lunch in the park," said Webb, 66. "It was a place you could be away from the dreariness of a really bottom-scale apartment.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2006
"Boss Radio" will live again -- at least for a few hours -- when XM Satellite Radio pays tribute to the old KHJ-AM on its 1960s channel. Every Friday, the XM show "Sonic Sound Salutes" resurrects a station from the '60s era, playing jingles and clips of the DJs and taking calls from listeners who remember it. This week, from 1 to 6 p.m.
SPORTS
October 15, 1993 | LARRY STEWART
Charlie Tuna has been going around all week saying, "I've died and gone to radio heaven." He is ecstatic about his new job as the morning host at radio station KMPC, and station management is equally pleased. Tuna is just what the doctor ordered. He is pleasant, upbeat, professional, and with his 26 years in Los Angeles radio, brings credibility to a station that has had declining ratings ever since switching to an all-sports format 1 1/2 years ago.
SPORTS
October 8, 1993 | LARRY STEWART
Radio station KMPC, seeking to boost sagging ratings, has hired longtime Los Angeles radio personality Charlie Tuna to serve as host of the station's morning show. Beginning Monday, Tuna will replace Fred Wallin and Paola Boivin, who will both remain at the station on a part-time basis. KMPC also is bringing back Brian Golden and Doug Krikorian full time beginning Monday. They will work together as co-hosts of the midday show, replacing Tony Femino, who will move to weekends.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 1993 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Claudia Puig is a Times staff writer
The year was 1966. A late-night call came in to the switchboard at KHJ-AM, Los Angeles' powerhouse rock 'n' roll station. On the line was Brian Wilson, the creative force behind the Beach Boys, the local surf band that had already attained superstar status. He was calling from the recording studio where he had just finished cutting the seminal rock record "Good Vibrations." Did KHJ want to be the first to play it? "Bands would cut a record on Tuesday, and Wednesday they'd give us a tape," recalled former KHJ deejay Charlie Tuna.
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