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Charlotte Rampling

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011
As haunting and captivating as its famed subject, Angelina Maccarone's "Charlotte Rampling: The Look" proves a unique documentary portrait of one of cinema's most quietly enduring talents. Although a linear, anecdotal biopic could easily have been fashioned about the British-born actress — aptly dubbed here "an icon of desire" — Maccarone instead enlists Rampling herself to reflect on her life via naturalistic chats (artfully shot in New York, Paris and London) with friends and collaborators including fashion photographers Peter Lindbergh and Juergen Teller, writer Paul Auster, director-son Barnaby Southcombe and production designer Franckie Diago.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
As "Dexter" goes into its eighth and final season, its legacy seems assured. While other shows dabbled in the fractured -- often to the point of pathology -- hero, "Dexter" took the concept and ran, adapting a series of novels in which the hero was a serial killer. In the premiere of our new video feature Talking TV, Times television critic Mary McNamara and TV reporters Greg Braxton and Yvonne Villarreal discuss the highs and lows of "Dexter," its effect on TV and how the season may end. PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments Deeply disturbing and darkly funny, "Dexter" was a show that, in the early years, fans "admitted" they liked, rushing to explain the moral implications of Dexter Morgan's code -- a blood splatter analyst for the Miami Police Department, he killed only those people who could not be brought to justice -- and the satiric implications of such a character.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011 | By Gary Goldstein
As haunting and captivating as its famed subject, Angelina Maccarone's "Charlotte Rampling: The Look" proves a unique documentary portrait of one of cinema's most quietly enduring talents. Although a linear, anecdotal biopic could easily have been fashioned about the British-born actress — aptly dubbed here "an icon of desire" — Maccarone instead enlists Rampling herself to reflect on her life via naturalistic chats (artfully shot in New York, Paris and London) with friends and collaborators including fashion photographers Peter Lindbergh and Juergen Teller, writer Paul Auster, director-son Barnaby Southcombe and production designer Franckie Diago.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Maybe the legacy media aren't dead after all: Aaron Sorkin's "The Newsroom" posted a small gain in its Season 2 premiere Sunday. An average of 2.2 million total viewers tuned in to the 10 p.m. broadcast, according to Nielsen. That's a relatively modest 4% gain compared with last year's premiere, but at least the numbers are headed in a positive direction. That's good news for HBO, given that Sorkin's series about a fictional cable news network was considered something of a disappointment last season.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Susan King
Charlotte Rampling has gone from "The Look" to "The Legend. " She received the moniker "The Look" when as a beautiful, carefree dolly bird in swinging '60s London she made an early name for herself in Richard Lester's 1965 comedy "The Knack" and 1966's dark comedy "Georgy Girl. " A 2011 documentary on the actress was aptly titled "Charlotte Rampling: The Look. " But in France, where's she lived since 1979, Rampling's been lovingly nicknamed "The Legend" because of memorable performances playing brave, daring and often difficult women in such acclaimed films as Luchino Visconti's 1969 epic "The Damned," Liliana Cavani's controversial 1974 drama "The Night Porter," Sidney Lumet's acclaimed 1982 drama "The Verdict" and Francois Ozon's "Under the Sand" (2001)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Maybe the legacy media aren't dead after all: Aaron Sorkin's "The Newsroom" posted a small gain in its Season 2 premiere Sunday. An average of 2.2 million total viewers tuned in to the 10 p.m. broadcast, according to Nielsen. That's a relatively modest 4% gain compared with last year's premiere, but at least the numbers are headed in a positive direction. That's good news for HBO, given that Sorkin's series about a fictional cable news network was considered something of a disappointment last season.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Scott Collins
The George Zimmerman trial was a friend to cable TV news until the end, with big ratings for Saturday night's verdict. More than 10 million total viewers watched the culmination of the month-long trial live on CNN, Fox News and MSNBC on Saturday, according to Nielsen. A jury found Zimmerman not guilty of second-degree murder in the shooting death of teenager Trayvon Martin. The case had attracted national attention and sparked racial tensions. Fox led the way, with 3.7 million during the 10 to 11 p.m. hour, when the not-guilty verdict was delivered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Godfrey Rampling, 100, who was believed to be Britain's oldest Olympian and who won gold in the 4x400-meter relay at the 1936 Berlin Games, died in his sleep June 20 at a nursing home in Bushey, England. He was the father of actress Charlotte Rampling. The Olympian ran the second leg of the 1936 relay with teammates Fred Wolff, Bill Roberts and Arthur Brown, beating the U.S. and German teams. At the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, Rampling had been on the British team that took the silver medal in the 4x400 relay.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Asiana Airlines will sue a Bay Area TV station over bogus pilot names it broadcast last week. Airline spokesperson Lee Hyomin said the report seriously damaged the airline's reputation and that it will file suit to "strongly respond to [KTVU's] racially discriminatory report," according to the Associated Press. In a Friday report, KTVU-TV wrongly identified the pilots of the Asiana jet that crashed at San Francisco International Airport on July 6 as "Capt. Sum Ting Wong" and "Bang Ding Ow. " The station later apologized, as did the National Transportation Safety Board, which said that an intern wrongly confirmed the names to the station.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
As "Dexter" goes into its eighth and final season, its legacy seems assured. While other shows dabbled in the fractured -- often to the point of pathology -- hero, "Dexter" took the concept and ran, adapting a series of novels in which the hero was a serial killer. In the premiere of our new video feature Talking TV, Times television critic Mary McNamara and TV reporters Greg Braxton and Yvonne Villarreal discuss the highs and lows of "Dexter," its effect on TV and how the season may end. PHOTOS: Hollywood backlot moments Deeply disturbing and darkly funny, "Dexter" was a show that, in the early years, fans "admitted" they liked, rushing to explain the moral implications of Dexter Morgan's code -- a blood splatter analyst for the Miami Police Department, he killed only those people who could not be brought to justice -- and the satiric implications of such a character.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Scott Collins
The George Zimmerman trial was a friend to cable TV news until the end, with big ratings for Saturday night's verdict. More than 10 million total viewers watched the culmination of the month-long trial live on CNN, Fox News and MSNBC on Saturday, according to Nielsen. A jury found Zimmerman not guilty of second-degree murder in the shooting death of teenager Trayvon Martin. The case had attracted national attention and sparked racial tensions. Fox led the way, with 3.7 million during the 10 to 11 p.m. hour, when the not-guilty verdict was delivered.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Susan King
Charlotte Rampling has gone from "The Look" to "The Legend. " She received the moniker "The Look" when as a beautiful, carefree dolly bird in swinging '60s London she made an early name for herself in Richard Lester's 1965 comedy "The Knack" and 1966's dark comedy "Georgy Girl. " A 2011 documentary on the actress was aptly titled "Charlotte Rampling: The Look. " But in France, where's she lived since 1979, Rampling's been lovingly nicknamed "The Legend" because of memorable performances playing brave, daring and often difficult women in such acclaimed films as Luchino Visconti's 1969 epic "The Damned," Liliana Cavani's controversial 1974 drama "The Night Porter," Sidney Lumet's acclaimed 1982 drama "The Verdict" and Francois Ozon's "Under the Sand" (2001)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Asiana Airlines will sue a Bay Area TV station over bogus pilot names it broadcast last week. Airline spokesperson Lee Hyomin said the report seriously damaged the airline's reputation and that it will file suit to "strongly respond to [KTVU's] racially discriminatory report," according to the Associated Press. In a Friday report, KTVU-TV wrongly identified the pilots of the Asiana jet that crashed at San Francisco International Airport on July 6 as "Capt. Sum Ting Wong" and "Bang Ding Ow. " The station later apologized, as did the National Transportation Safety Board, which said that an intern wrongly confirmed the names to the station.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011 | By Gary Goldstein
As haunting and captivating as its famed subject, Angelina Maccarone's "Charlotte Rampling: The Look" proves a unique documentary portrait of one of cinema's most quietly enduring talents. Although a linear, anecdotal biopic could easily have been fashioned about the British-born actress — aptly dubbed here "an icon of desire" — Maccarone instead enlists Rampling herself to reflect on her life via naturalistic chats (artfully shot in New York, Paris and London) with friends and collaborators including fashion photographers Peter Lindbergh and Juergen Teller, writer Paul Auster, director-son Barnaby Southcombe and production designer Franckie Diago.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011
As haunting and captivating as its famed subject, Angelina Maccarone's "Charlotte Rampling: The Look" proves a unique documentary portrait of one of cinema's most quietly enduring talents. Although a linear, anecdotal biopic could easily have been fashioned about the British-born actress — aptly dubbed here "an icon of desire" — Maccarone instead enlists Rampling herself to reflect on her life via naturalistic chats (artfully shot in New York, Paris and London) with friends and collaborators including fashion photographers Peter Lindbergh and Juergen Teller, writer Paul Auster, director-son Barnaby Southcombe and production designer Franckie Diago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Godfrey Rampling, 100, who was believed to be Britain's oldest Olympian and who won gold in the 4x400-meter relay at the 1936 Berlin Games, died in his sleep June 20 at a nursing home in Bushey, England. He was the father of actress Charlotte Rampling. The Olympian ran the second leg of the 1936 relay with teammates Fred Wolff, Bill Roberts and Arthur Brown, beating the U.S. and German teams. At the 1932 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, Rampling had been on the British team that took the silver medal in the 4x400 relay.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you're reading Chekhov, author-illustrator Edward Gorey once said, you wonder why you read anyone else. Michael Cacoyannis' new film of the great Russian writer's final masterpiece, "The Cherry Orchard," illustrates what Gorey was talking about. Something of a one-man band (writer, director, producer, co-editor), Cacoyannis is best known for the 1963 film "Zorba the Greek" as well as his passionate restagings of the Euripides trio of "Electra," "Iphigenia" and "The Trojan Women."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the start of Francois Ozon's astute and penetrating "Under the Sand," an affluent, sophisticated Parisian couple, Marie and Jean Drillon (Charlotte Rampling and Bruno Cremer), are in their elegant apartment packing for a vacation. Soon they are on their way to the Landes region of southwestern France, where they will be staying in a spacious residence, not far from a splendid beach. They swiftly settle in and head for the beach the next day.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Whenever Charlotte Rampling narrows her sly cat eyes in a movie, it's always a surprise that anyone walks away unscathed. Famous for her haughty cheekbones and a body that directors love to film unclothed, the British actress has built a screen persona playing intimidating, outwardly unattainable women.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you're reading Chekhov, author-illustrator Edward Gorey once said, you wonder why you read anyone else. Michael Cacoyannis' new film of the great Russian writer's final masterpiece, "The Cherry Orchard," illustrates what Gorey was talking about. Something of a one-man band (writer, director, producer, co-editor), Cacoyannis is best known for the 1963 film "Zorba the Greek" as well as his passionate restagings of the Euripides trio of "Electra," "Iphigenia" and "The Trojan Women."
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