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Chartered Schools

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several attempts to find a home, students at the San Fernando Valley's first charter middle school recently settled into a former preschool with 6,000 square feet, ample outdoor space and a multipurpose room. "We're finally here," said Jackie Elliot, founder and executive director of Community Charter Middle School at 1441 Celis St. "And we're doing great." Finding a permanent site was challenging.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1998 | TOM SCHULTZ
If Jacqueline Elliot has her way, Pacoima will see a charter middle school open in the fall of 1999. Elliot--curriculum advisor at Montague Charter Academy, a Pacoima charter elementary school--recently received $35,000 in federal grant money distributed through the California Department of Education to fund the planning of the middle school, a project she proposed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2007 | Joel Rubin and Howard Blume, Times Staff Writers
For students at Synergy Academy, Friday afternoons bring a lesson in nomadic teaching. Classroom rugs are rolled up and pushed against the wall. Collapsible bookshelves are folded down and a mobile computer lab is whisked away. Cleaning supplies get tucked into one corner, a portable nursing station into another. That's life when you're a charter school renting from a Catholic Church that needs the space for weekend catechism classes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 2000 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Educator Brenda Buonora envisions students teaching each other, children playing on a patch of green grass among lemon trees, and parents volunteering and knowing at all times how their kids are faring academically and socially. Buonora, a Northridge resident, believes such an idyllic setting will help improve public education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2003 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
Leaders of California's charter school movement launched a statewide association this week, aimed at tripling the number of students attending the tax-funded but independently run campuses over the next decade. The California Charter Schools Assn. has opened offices in Los Angeles and Sacramento to recruit school leaders and offer technical assistance, financial advice and other help. Other offices will open in San Diego and San Francisco by the beginning of December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2003 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
Six California charter schools are receiving more than $48 million in grants from a 2002 state bond, the first time that such money has been allocated to pay for construction on campuses of the independent but tax-supported schools. State Treasurer Phil Angelides was at the Animo Leadership Charter High School in Inglewood on Thursday to announce that the school had received $5 million to fund the construction or purchase of a permanent campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2008 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
More Los Angeles campuses will have to make room for charter schools, even if some teachers are forced to give up their classrooms and become roving instructors, under a litigation settlement approved by the Los Angeles Board of Education on Tuesday. The agreement requires the school district to inventory all properties and work directly with charter schools to find space on or off campus. Charter advocates say finding and paying for facilities is their No. 1 challenge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2001 | ZANTO PEABODY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Through preschool, Delia Smith's son mingled with other children and received the attention he needed for a disability that distorts his visual perception, making subjects such as mathematics difficult, and puts him at high risk of a heart attack. When 7-year-old Daniel entered first grade, Smith feared he would be placed in a special-education bungalow isolated from children in mainstream classes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2008 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
Public schools on the Palos Verdes Peninsula are among the state's highest achieving, and two of the wealthy enclave's high schools are ranked in the nation's top 100. But to a small band of parents, that's not enough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2007 | Howard Blume, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Board of Education signaled its intent Tuesday to enter an agreement that would make Locke High School the first Los Angeles campus managed by an outside charter-school organization. The decision is especially controversial since numerous teachers withdrew their signatures from a petition calling for the conversion. The board action, by a 5-2 vote, calls for the Locke petition to come before the school board for an up-or-down vote in two weeks.
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