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Chartered Schools

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1999 | KRISTINA SAUERWEIN
The California Department of Education has awarded a former math teacher and school reform activist a $35,000, 18-month grant to develop a charter elementary school in the southwest San Fernando Valley. Organizers hope to open the Multicultural Learning Center during the fall of 2001 in the Canoga Park-West Hills area with 265 kindergartners through fourth-graders.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Howard Lappin, the Los Angeles school principal who earned accolades for turning his impoverished South Los Angeles students into high achievers, is leaving his job to help run a collection of local charter schools, his new employer announced Monday. For the last 12 years, Lappin has been principal of Foshay Learning Center, a campus of 3,550 students in kindergarten through high school located near USC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2001 | From Times staff writers
Los Angeles charter schools have performed almost flawlessly in a series of audits on attendance reporting prompted by abuses in an Apple Valley charter school operation. In audits of seven schools chartered under the Los Angeles Unified School District, the state controller's office found problems at only one. That school, Montague Charter Academy in Pacoima, must reimburse the state $14,155 for over-reported attendance, an auditor concluded.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2010 | By Howard Blume
Green Dot Public Schools, a leading charter school operator, is shutting down a campus because of low enrollment, financial pressures and subpar performance, officials confirmed Monday. The action prompted a daylong student protest Monday at Animo Justice Charter High School, south of downtown Los Angeles. The closure marks a first for locally based and nationally recognized Green Dot, which has 19 area campuses and one in New York City. The nonprofit Green Dot opened five independently run, publicly funded charters, including Animo Justice, four years ago, near long-struggling Jefferson High School in South Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2006 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to stave off potentially crippling funding cuts, a chain of charter schools for high school dropouts has asked a state judge to take its side against the California Department of Education. The lawsuit filed by Options for Youth and Opportunities for Learning comes a month after the state expanded a yearlong audit of the schools' finances, and follows a long-standing dispute between education officials and founders John and Joan Hall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1994 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Santiago Middle School Principal Mary Ann Owsley must resolve a host of weighty issues before she opens the county's first charter school next fall, but she is finding that the simplest issues can be the most controversial. Students took three ballots before they agreed on colors for the mandatory school uniform, and Owsley said she anticipates a few struggles before everyone agrees to wear the white, gray or teal shirt with navy pants, skirts or shorts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Board of Education tossed the thorny issue of funding for charter schools back in the lap of Los Angeles school officials Friday by deciding not to decide for local districts how much money such schools should get.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | From Associated Press
School board members have given Edison Schools Inc. 90 days to fix problems that critics claim exist at the city's only for-profit school. The board's 6-1 vote late Tuesday followed the release of a district investigation launched about a month ago, following complaints by parents, students and teachers. But Edison has said the real problem is that some people do not approve of having a private company run a public school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of parents in the Newport-Mesa Unified School district asked trustees Wednesday to allow them to open a charter school next fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2003 | Erika Hayasaki, Times Staff Writer
Former Los Angeles school board president Caprice Young will head a newly formed organization that seeks to support the more than 400 charter schools in California and help others get started. The organization, which has not yet been named, will merge several current groups, including the California Network of Education Charters, which now represents about 70% of the state's charter schools. Charters are supported by tax money but are exempted from many state regulations.
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