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NEWS
September 18, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a recent session of Cambodia's National Assembly, reporters and foreign diplomats received an illuminating peek into the machinations of the country's politics during a break for refreshments in the parking lot. Here, said a government spokesman, was the commerce minister's Mercedes-Benz limousine, and over there was the sleek gray sedan which ferries around Premier Hun Sen. In the corner, he pointed out, sat the smallest car on the lot, a tiny Toyota, that belongs to Chea Sim.
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NEWS
September 18, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During a recent session of Cambodia's National Assembly, reporters and foreign diplomats received an illuminating peek into the machinations of the country's politics during a break for refreshments in the parking lot. Here, said a government spokesman, was the commerce minister's Mercedes-Benz limousine, and over there was the sleek gray sedan which ferries around Premier Hun Sen. In the corner, he pointed out, sat the smallest car on the lot, a tiny Toyota, that belongs to Chea Sim.
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NEWS
August 10, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
King Norodom Sihanouk, while condemning the bloody coup that ousted his son as first prime minister, said in a letter that he is powerless to help the people. "I have no ability to do anything," the constitutional monarch wrote from Beijing, where he is undergoing medical treatment. He said he still regards his son, Prince Norodom Ranariddh, as a legitimate prime minister. Lawmakers have confirmed Ung Huot, coup leader Hun Sen's handpicked replacement for Ranariddh.
NEWS
June 16, 1993 | Reuters
The leaders of Cambodia's three main political parties have agreed to set up an interim government, national radio said. It said agreement was reached at a meeting Tuesday between head of state Prince Norodom Sihanouk and members of the Constituent Assembly elected last month in U.N.-organized balloting.
NEWS
August 8, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
King Norodom Sihanouk gave tacit approval Thursday to the replacement of his son as first prime minister, effectively endorsing last month's bloody coup by Hun Sen, the second prime minister. Army units loyal to Hun Sen, meanwhile, were deployed near the Thai border for a new offensive against opposition troops controlling the zone. An estimated 15,000 refugees displaced by fighting have gathered in the area.
NEWS
October 19, 1991 | From Reuters
The ruling party in Cambodia declared a formal end to more than 13 years of communism Friday, replacing its president and embracing multi-party democracy and a free market system. The changes came in the final resolution of a two-day extraordinary congress of the newly named Cambodian People's Party just days before Wednesday's scheduled signing in Paris of a peace accord ending a civil war that began in 1979. They are intended to improve the party image before elections to be held under U.N.
WORLD
October 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
Prince Norodom Sihamoni was named Cambodia's king Thursday, succeeding his father, Norodom Sihanouk, who last week announced his abdication because of ill health. Sihamoni, a former ballet dancer and cultural ambassador who has spent much of his life abroad, was approved by a nine-member Throne Council, said a statement signed by the panel's chairman and acting head of state, Chea Sim.
NEWS
June 11, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations on Thursday officially declared the opposition royalist party the winner of Cambodia's national elections, but the Phnom Penh regime said it still could not accept the results.
NEWS
August 7, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration announced Wednesday that it will not recognize the parliamentary election of Ung Huot as Cambodia's first prime minister because of the "great atmosphere of intimidation" that, according to senior U.S. officials, prevented about 17% of the nation's legislators from voting. But the statement fell short of a formal rejection of Cambodia's new co-leader.
NEWS
January 14, 1992 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than two months after the Paris peace agreement on Cambodia, the relatively slow pace of deployment of U.N. peacekeeping troops is creating a sense of instability in the country, and there are fears that this could lead to upheaval, according to Cambodian officials and Western diplomats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1989 | VORA HUY KANTHOUL, Vora Huy Kanthoul was a Cambodian foreign service officer until 1975. He now works with the Cambodian community in Los Angeles.
Vietnam's nearly completed military withdrawal from Cambodia has shifted the focus from Vietnam's behavior to the possible return to power by force of the notorious Khmer Rouge, during whose almost four-year reign of terror as many as 3 million Cambodians perished. Haunted by the specter of such a possibility and pressed to make a choice now, Cambodians would reluctantly accept a Vietnam-dominated regime as the lesser of two evils.
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