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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2008 | Christine Hanley
A judge refused to block a decision by a college testing service to invalidate the Advanced Placement scores of hundreds of Orange County high school students amid allegations of cheating and sloppy supervision at the exam site. The Trabuco Hills High School students, who call themselves Justice for 375, had sought a temporary restraining order to stop the Educational Testing Service from canceling their scores, arguing that the New Jersey nonprofit organization unfairly voided the test scores before conducting even a cursory investigation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Robert J. Lopez and Ben Welsh
John Mireles spent six years preparing to become a firefighter. The Signal Hill resident took fire science classes and worked nights on an ambulance crew, in addition to his full-time day job. He said he passed the Los Angeles Fire Department written exam, made it through an interview and background check and reached the final stages of the hiring process. But last week he was among hundreds of candidates who received a terse, two-sentence email from city personnel officials: They would no longer be hiring from a pool of applicants who had advanced through a yearlong screening process.
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SPORTS
November 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
A James Bond-style ultrasonic gun disguised as a pair of binoculars was used to stun a top thoroughbred during a race, and could have become the key tool in a massive drug and betting conspiracy, a British court was told Tuesday. Defense attorney Jonathan Goldberg said the high-pitched sound from the gun caused the thoroughbred, Ile de Chypre, to veer suddenly and throw jockey Greville Starkey as they were heading for victory at Ascot racecourse on June 16, 1988.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2014 | By E. Scott Reckard
A former Fannie Mae employee was convicted late Friday of soliciting kickbacks from a broker with promises to steer lucrative listings of foreclosed homes his way. The federal court jury in Santa Ana convicted Armando Granillo of three counts of fraud, rejecting his contention that he intended to cheat only the broker, not Fannie Mae, the nation's largest home-finance firm. At the end of a two-day trial, the jury took less than two hours to convict Granillo, who sat grimly as each of the jurors affirmed the guilty verdicts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1992 | JAMES QUINN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ralphs Grocery Co. admitted in court Tuesday that it cheated customers at San Fernando Valley supermarkets by overcharging them for items that were marked as being on sale. In a plea bargain with prosecutors entered in Van Nuys Municipal Court, the supermarket chain agreed to conduct price-accuracy training program for employees and to pay $3,500 in fines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1998 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A professional gambler has been indicted by a federal grand jury in a racetrack scheme that allegedly involved cashing other bettors' tickets and obtaining refunds from false tax returns. The activities of James J. Greulich of Huntington Beach took place at the Del Mar, Santa Anita and Hollywood Park tracks in 1995.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
Twenty-two California schools had their test scores thrown out this year for reasons ranging from outright cheating to comparatively minor mistakes, such as failing to cover up bulletin boards or stumbling over instructions. In most cases, schools or school districts turned themselves in. Because of budget cuts, the state Education Department no longer conducts random audits at schools or scans test booklets for irregularities. Nearly half the campuses lost their Academic Performance Index scores because of cheating by teachers on the multiple-choice tests.
SPORTS
February 4, 2001 | THOMAS BOSWELL, WASHINGTON POST
Bobby Thomson's Shot Heard 'Round The World has been chosen the greatest moment in baseball history by The Sporting News and the second-greatest sports moment of the 20th century by Sports Illustrated. Now, the Wall Street Journal is calling it something else: perhaps the final illustration of 10 weeks of cheating by Leo Durocher's 1951 New York Giants. For 50 years, Thomson has been baseball's ideal clutch hero and Ralph Branca the game's most symbolic goat.
OPINION
July 17, 2012 | By Victor Dorff
Cheating was, is and probably always will be a fact of life. Recently, technology has provided new ways to cheat, but advanced electronics can't be blamed for our increasing willingness to tolerate it. Once upon a time, being an honorable person included the notion that your word was your bond, and integrity was a crucial element in establishing a good reputation. At least, that was part of the narrative that made up our social compact. My teaching experience tells me, however, that lying and cheating are seen by a lot of kids today as a crucial part of any path to success.
OPINION
April 3, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
If a student cheats on an important test, such as a midterm, he is punished, and rightly so. His teacher doesn't merely brush aside the offense and blame it on all the stressful and unnecessary high-stakes tests that today's unfortunate students are required to take. Yet every time an educator is caught in a test-cheating scandal, the teachers union response is as predictable as 2 plus 2: Of course cheating is wrong, but what else can we expect when policymakers stress achievement on standardized tests - and especially when, as in this case, there were financial bonuses attached to higher scores?
OPINION
March 2, 2014 | By Edward Frenkel
Imagine you had to take an art class in which you were taught how to paint a fence or a wall, but you were never shown the paintings of the great masters, and you weren't even told that such paintings existed. Pretty soon you'd be asking, why study art? That's absurd, of course, but it's surprisingly close to the way we teach children mathematics. In elementary and middle school and even into high school, we hide math's great masterpieces from students' view. The arithmetic, algebraic equations and geometric proofs we do teach are important, but they are to mathematics what whitewashing a fence is to Picasso - so reductive it's almost a lie. Most of us never get to see the real mathematics because our current math curriculum is more than 1,000 years old. For example, the formula for solutions of quadratic equations was in al-Khwarizmi's book published in 830, and Euclid laid the foundations of Euclidean geometry around 300 BC. If the same time warp were true in physics or biology, we wouldn't know about the solar system, the atom and DNA. This creates an extraordinary educational gap for our kids, schools and society.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Happy Valentine's Day! It's the perfect day to look at monogamy in the animal kingdom. But if your first thoughts are warm and cuddly, you can wipe away those Disney delusions. When it comes to monogamy among animals, there are few ladies and many tramps. Certain species have been held up historically as models of monogamy -- swans, gibbons, the wolf pack's alpha male and female. But scientific research over time has chipped away at those paragons of virtue. Animals cheat.  MORE: Here's what happens to a brain in love Birds, in particular, were thought to be sexually steadfast with their mates.
OPINION
February 12, 2014
Re "Errors could hurt college bound," Feb. 10 Such a simple word as "errors" diminishes the severity of purposely concealing grave misconduct by college applicants. The 11 Orange County students recently expelled from their high school over the cheating scandal in which they took part likely knew that what they were doing was wrong. Any college or university that wishes to keep the public's respect must have a standard policy of discarding any application deemed dishonest. Merely urging students who have cheated to "come clean quickly" is hardly enough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2014 | By Larry Gordon and Jason Song
The recent expulsions of 11 students from an Orange County high school because of a cheating scandal appeared to be a forceful stand against academic dishonesty. But that discipline also has focused attention on the murkier questions about whether, and how, colleges should be informed about applicants' histories of misbehavior. College admissions officials say the expelled students and others in similar situations should come clean quickly to schools they've applied to, and they should be prepared for the consequences, including the possibility of having acceptance letters revoked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014 | By Christopher Goffard
Deepening the intrigue in a cheating scandal that has shaken one of the state's top schools, an administrator for a coastal Orange County school district resigned Wednesday after excoriating officials for their handling of the case. Eleven students were expelled last week from high-achieving Corona del Mar High School amid allegations that they were involved in a scheme to hack into the district's computer system to change grades and access exams. Jane Garland, the administrator who was deeply involved in the case for months as Newport-Mesa Unified School District's head of discipline, said the district badly fumbled the investigation and ignored her recommendations to give the students a lighter punishment or heed warnings that the problem might be more far-reaching.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014 | By Christopher Goffard
An administrator for the Newport-Mesa Unified School District resigned Wednesday after alleging the school district badly mishandled a computer-hacking scandal that resulted in the expulsion of 11 students. Jane Garland, who was deeply involved in the case for months as the district's head of discipline, said the district ignored her recommendations to give the students a lighter punishment. “They didn't stop to think about it,” Garland said. “They went ahead, and these children got destroyed in the newspapers.” Garland, in an email to school board members and administrators, called the handling of the expulsions “a total farce” and said the way in which students were selected for punishment seemed “arbitrary.” Eleven students were expelled last week from high-achieving Corona del Mar High School amid allegations they were involved in a scheme to hack into the district computer system to change grades and access exams.
OPINION
June 17, 2012 | By Dan Ariely
Sometimes as I decide what kind of papers to assign to my students, I worry about essay mills, companies whose sole purpose is to generate essays for high school and college students (in exchange for a fee, of course). The mills claim that the papers are meant to be used as reference material to help students write their own, original papers. But with names such as echeat.com, it's pretty clear what their real purpose is. Professors in general are concerned about essay mills and their effect on learning, but not knowing exactly what they provide, I wasn't sure how concerned to be. So together with my lab manager Aline Grüneisen, I decided to check the services out. We ordered a typical college term paper from four different essay mills.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2012 | By David Sarno
If you're one of the millions of new players of the addictive online Pictionary-like game Draw Something (which earned its maker, OMGPOP, a $180-million payday from buyer Zynga), you know there's one thing that Draw Something players can't seem to erase: cheating. For those who haven't played, the game mechanics are simple. You, the artist, are given a palette of colors and a word to draw out with your finger. The object is to get your opponent to guess it correctly. If she does, you both get play money that can be used to buy in-game stuff like new paint colors and brush shapes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By Hannah Fry
Newport Beach police detectives have enlisted the help of an  FBI  lab in their ongoing investigation into the Corona del Mar High S chool cheating scandal. Police asked federal agents for assistance investigating private tutor Timothy Lance Lai , who s chool officials say masterminded a scheme in which a dozen students obtained the passwords and log-on information of teachers and hacked into the district computer system to change grades and access exams.
NATIONAL
February 4, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - The Navy said Tuesday that instructors responsible for training sailors to operate nuclear reactors that power submarines and aircraft carriers may have cheated on qualification tests, the latest in a series of ethical and criminal misconduct cases roiling the Pentagon. The Navy suspended 30 senior enlisted sailors serving as instructors at the Navy base in Charleston, S.C., after a sailor seeking to qualify as an instructor alerted his superiors that he had been offered answers to a written test on reactor operations, senior Navy officers said.
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