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Chechnya Russia

NEWS
July 4, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since it declared war on his breakaway republic and put out a warrant for his arrest, the Russian government Monday sent a peace envoy to meet Chechen President Dzhokar M. Dudayev as both sides struggled for a way to end six months of fighting. The midnight-to-4 a.m. meeting at Dudayev's mountain hide-out was inconclusive and left peace talks in Grozny, the Chechen capital, deadlocked over the tiny republic's political status. The talks were adjourned until Thursday.
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NEWS
December 31, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chechnya's biggest oil refinery complex burned out of control Friday after reportedly being struck by Russian bombers, and Chechen officials warned that the blaze could spread to a nearby tank containing 5,000 tons of explosive ammonia. "If it catches fire, an ecological disaster will hit the entire North Caucasus," a Chechen Foreign Ministry official told Interfax news agency.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia is now a country at war. The combat theater is small, the location obscure and the casualties likely to remain a relative trickle compared to those in Rwanda or Bosnia. But when the Kremlin decided to break Chechnya's bid for independence by military force, when it began dropping bombs on what it considers Russian towns and shelling Russian citizens, it crossed a line beyond which only one thing is sure: This Eurasian colossus has become a more volatile place.
NEWS
December 15, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Showing no chink in their defiance, rebel Chechens shot down a Russian helicopter gunship Wednesday and steeled themselves for the bloody storm of their capital that they expect when the deadline to submit to Kremlin rule expires today. Peace talks, mired in the dispute over whether the mountainous Muslim republic is part of Russia, broke down, and Chechen President Dzhokar M. Dudayev went on television to exhort his citizens to smite the Russian interlopers until they "die of fear and horror."
NEWS
December 7, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foiled in its attempts to oust the rebel leader of the breakaway republic of Chechnya, Russia dispatched two key ministers Tuesday to negotiate the release of its prisoners of war. Defense Minister Pavel S. Grachev announced on Russian television late Tuesday that President Dzhokar Dudayev of Chechnya had agreed to release Russian POWs captured 11 days ago during an attempt to storm Dudayev's presidential palace in Grozny, the Chechen capital.
WORLD
February 8, 2005 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
After years of war in the separatist republic of Chechnya, Russia faces an offer that politically is almost as difficult: an end to the fighting. Rebel leader Aslan Maskhadov confirmed Monday that he had ordered a unilateral cease-fire and appointed an emissary to attend peace talks on the conflict, which has killed tens of thousands of people since 1994.
WORLD
July 30, 2002 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Open warfare flared in the mountains of Russia's rebellious republic of Chechnya on Monday as helicopter gunships chased down a band of rebels holed up in a gorge near the Georgian border. The battle appeared to be the first major firefight in the region since last year. Russia and Georgia traded accusations over the cause and conduct of the fighting.
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleven fruitless days after President Boris N. Yeltsin unveiled a peace plan for Chechnya, his strategy for ending the war was wedged Thursday between a Russian army commander who vowed to "smash" the rebels if they do not surrender and a political ally who urged the president to talk directly with Chechen separatist leader Dzhokar M. Dudayev.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher held amicable talks Thursday with Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev, clearly indicating that, despite the war raging in Chechnya, the Clinton Administration does not want to penalize Russia for its use of force. Kozyrev, grateful for the Clinton Administration's relatively mild response to Chechnya, promised after the talks ended that Russia will not let the end of the Cold War deteriorate into a "cold peace," as Russian President Boris N.
WORLD
August 27, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Russia has tried hard to establish an atmosphere of normality in this ruined city battered by two wars for independence. Compensation is being paid to some of those who lost their homes, oil revenue is up, and balloting to elect a new president of the Chechen republic is just three days away. But this is Chechnya, Russia's Iraq.
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