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Chechnya Russia

NEWS
December 15, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Showing no chink in their defiance, rebel Chechens shot down a Russian helicopter gunship Wednesday and steeled themselves for the bloody storm of their capital that they expect when the deadline to submit to Kremlin rule expires today. Peace talks, mired in the dispute over whether the mountainous Muslim republic is part of Russia, broke down, and Chechen President Dzhokar M. Dudayev went on television to exhort his citizens to smite the Russian interlopers until they "die of fear and horror."
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NEWS
December 7, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foiled in its attempts to oust the rebel leader of the breakaway republic of Chechnya, Russia dispatched two key ministers Tuesday to negotiate the release of its prisoners of war. Defense Minister Pavel S. Grachev announced on Russian television late Tuesday that President Dzhokar Dudayev of Chechnya had agreed to release Russian POWs captured 11 days ago during an attempt to storm Dudayev's presidential palace in Grozny, the Chechen capital.
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eleven fruitless days after President Boris N. Yeltsin unveiled a peace plan for Chechnya, his strategy for ending the war was wedged Thursday between a Russian army commander who vowed to "smash" the rebels if they do not surrender and a political ally who urged the president to talk directly with Chechen separatist leader Dzhokar M. Dudayev.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher held amicable talks Thursday with Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev, clearly indicating that, despite the war raging in Chechnya, the Clinton Administration does not want to penalize Russia for its use of force. Kozyrev, grateful for the Clinton Administration's relatively mild response to Chechnya, promised after the talks ended that Russia will not let the end of the Cold War deteriorate into a "cold peace," as Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
June 26, 2000 | MAYERBEK NUNAYEV and ROBYN DIXON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He is a 31-year-old former oil refinery worker who grew up in Shali, a town in Chechnya that tried to stay out of the Chechen war. He was a "peaceful, normal guy" who decided not to fight with the rebels against the Russian army. But Rasul, who gives only his first name, has become a killer who sleeps in the woods by day and shoots at Russian soldiers by night.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aslan Maskhadov, the military commander who helped bring peace to separatist Chechnya, proclaimed himself the new president of the southern republic Tuesday on the basis of leaked, partial election results. Surrounded by armed guards and solemn advisors in fur hats, Maskhadov--the Chechen candidate whom Moscow preferred--swept into a postelection meeting with journalists and listened impassively as his spokesman announced his victory. "Today we start the first press conference with Mr.
NEWS
September 26, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the spate of recent terrorist bombings in Moscow and southern Russia, the nation learned a name already familiar, and frightening, to Americans: Osama bin Laden. After the apartment bombings that killed more than 300 Russians and terrified the nation this month, the Saudi millionaire's name was suddenly all over the Russian media, and the threat of international terrorism was on every politician's lips.
NEWS
August 13, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid signs that fighting in the Russian republic of Dagestan has spread into neighboring Chechnya, military officials for the first time acknowledged Thursday that they face serious problems in their bid to control a guerrilla rebellion in Dagestan, a troubled southern region. Russian planes continued rocket and bomb attacks in the area of seven Dagestani villages seized by Islamic militants who invaded from nearby Chechnya last weekend.
NEWS
October 2, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top U.S. official warned Moscow on Friday that using indiscriminate force against civilians to quell guerrilla groups in Chechnya threatens Russia's fragile democratic structures and, by implication, its working relationship with the West.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months after nighttime bombs killed more than 300 sleeping Russians, security officials insisted Thursday that a ring of Chechen terrorists is to blame and that they are making progress in bringing the perpetrators to justice. Investigators from the Federal Security Service, or FSB, the main successor to the KGB, staged a rare news conference and distributed photos of suspects they believe set off the bombs in September.
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