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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1985 | JAN KLUNDER, Times Staff Writer
Kaz Suyeishi describes herself as "an old jalopy car" needing a dozen replacement parts, a tuneup and a new transmission. And she is grateful for the Japanese doctors who travel half-way around the world every two years to inspect her engine and issue her a guarantee for a few more miles. Suyeishi, 58, is one of about 200 atomic bomb survivors now living in Southern California. On Aug.
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OPINION
December 27, 2004
As the credit cards come to rest post-holiday, do yourself a favor and exercise your new right to see what kind of damage you -- or someone else -- might have done to your credit record. The Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003 isn't perfect. Congress didn't fully protect consumers from identity theft or safeguard them from problems caused by faulty credit reports.
OPINION
August 5, 2001
For 550 local foster children, last month marked the end of a long, painful struggle to regain childhoods lost to abuse or neglect. In another "Adoption Saturday," Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael Nash presided over a room full of giddy parents and youngsters at the Children's Court in Monterey Court, finalizing the legalities that create new families. These are the luckiest kids in the county foster care system, because they're finally getting out of it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1998 | STEVE HARVEY
Glendale Hoover grad Leota Daniel attended a 55-year class reunion at the Balboa Bay Club and had a grand time despite a typographical error that lent a sobering note to the proceedings. "Those wishing to sign up for the putting contest or tennis," it said, "do so in the Hospital Suite." * HARDLY ANY DINER WOULD RELISH THIS: You know that fast-food outlet with the Chihuahua mascot?
BUSINESS
March 13, 2001 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stock market investors may want to borrow a few words of advice from Winston Churchill: "If you're going through hell, keep going." Recent market activity--punctuated by Monday's 436-point dive by the Dow Jones industrials--makes it clear that U.S. stocks are in the midst of a bear market.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1994
As a 40-year-old physician in my own private medical practice for 16 years (yes, I was young and idealistic when I started), I see idealism is still alive but maybe in need of reality testing. What Dr. Alan Zwerner fails to mention in his article ("The Corporate Physician Has Much More to Offer the Patient," July 17) is that in virtually all HMOs, physicians are financially penalized (or as he states "at risk") or may be terminated from a plan, for referring the "frail and catastrophically ill patients" for more advanced care.
HEALTH
May 3, 1999 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
For reasons ranging from poor access to medical care to cultural attitudes toward sickness and health, Latino women are less likely than either white or African American women to have had a gynecological checkup in the last year, or two years--or ever. A national survey has found that more than one in three Latinas said they hadn't had a routine gynecological or prenatal exam in the last year. Nearly a quarter hadn't had one in at least two years.
NEWS
November 8, 1987 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL
Doctors recommend that pregnant women receive 10 to 13 prenatal checkups to help ensure that their babies are born healthy. The first doctor's visit--which should take place within 14 weeks of conception--is critical because at this early point, common problems of hypertension, diabetes, anemia and infections can be detected in the mother and successfully treated. Tests can also be done early on to discover spinal cord, brain and genetic abnormalities in the fetus.
SPORTS
July 18, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
WASHINGTON - The Dodgers have a simple explanation for how they turned around their season: They became healthy. The team's blueprint for reaching the playoffs is equally simple. "One of the biggest keys is having our guys out there," first baseman Adrian Gonzalez said. As the Dodgers return from the All-Star break Friday here against the Nationals, they are only 2 1/2 games behind the first-place Arizona Diamondbacks in the National League West. And they are as close to full strength as they have been this season.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | GILLES TREQUESSER, Reuters
A unique Cuban treatment for skin disease is luring thousands of patients to Havana as Cuba tries to establish itself as a top medical center for the developing world. Already claiming to have one of the Third World's most advanced medical systems, Cuba is exploring ways to use this expertise to earn vitally needed hard currency amid its worst foreign exchange shortage since the 1959 revolution. To help turn medical advances into monetary dividends, the government established Servimex as a subsidiary of the Cubanacan holding company set up in 1987 to generate hard currency by developing tourism and joint ventures, a novelty in socialist Cuba.
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