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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989 | LAURIE OCHOA
At the moment Anne Sprecher is more concerned about the botched fish order than about the current state of women chefs. Thirty-nine whole New Zealand snappers were expected at Campanile this morning, but only nine showed up. She puts in an annoyed phone call to the supplier, but when it's clear that no more whole fish will be available, she reworks the night's specials with her boss, Mark Peel. ("We can do more lobster instead," she tells him. "We have more of them than we thought we did."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989 | LAURIE OCHOA
At the moment Anne Sprecher is more concerned about the botched fish order than about the current state of women chefs. Thirty-nine whole New Zealand snappers were expected at Campanile this morning, but only nine showed up. She puts in an annoyed phone call to the supplier, but when it's clear that no more whole fish will be available, she reworks the night's specials with her boss, Mark Peel. ("We can do more lobster instead," she tells him. "We have more of them than we thought we did."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
The stories have become legendary. There's the one about the male chef who was so infuriated about being asked to share his kitchen with a woman that he went up to the skylight and threw a pail of water on her. Another man welcomed a woman into his kitchen by sticking her cut finger into a bucket of salt. A third initiated his new woman helper by demanding that she instantly clean 25 pounds of squid.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
The stories have become legendary. There's the one about the male chef who was so infuriated about being asked to share his kitchen with a woman that he went up to the skylight and threw a pail of water on her. Another man welcomed a woman into his kitchen by sticking her cut finger into a bucket of salt. A third initiated his new woman helper by demanding that she instantly clean 25 pounds of squid.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
After she lost Tumbleweed, Elka Gilmore was hired to be the executive chef at Checkers, the fancy new downtown hotel. "Bill Wilkinson (the president of the corporation) and I are like opposite ends of the universe," Gilmore now says. "I loved the part of the job that was all structure and organization, but every time I'd cook he'd hate it. The more I'd try, the more he'd hate it. Finally he said to me, 'What do you think of when I say the words chop house?'
FOOD
February 23, 2005 | Corie Brown, Times Staff Writer
Margaritas made with volcanic ash. Braised oysters with chipotle bearnaise. Foie gras with habanero-spiked guava. There's a revolution afoot in this city's restaurants. The eyebrow reflexively shoots up. The first thought is globalization, that creeping sameness that threatens cultural individuality when tradition fades in favor of pop sensibilities.
FOOD
March 7, 1991 | MADELEINE KAMMAN, Kamman, author of "The Education of a Cook" and "In Madeleine's Kitchen," is the director of the School for American Chefs at Beringer Vineyards in the Napa Valley. and
In spite of all my professional kitchen work, I have never stopped cherishing each and every one of the home stoves I have owned, whether electric or gas. And I find the conventional home oven sufficient to keep family and friends entertained and fed happily on simple country-style dishes. My friends seem to relish those--everyone loudly expressing regrets if I have not put at least one of my old classics on the table.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1987 | COLMAN ANDREWS
Two potentially important new eating places are soon to open on or near Beverly Glen Boulevard--a street not previously known for its gastronomic pleasures. Up in the canyon, a mile or two north of Sunset, noted French chef Claude Segal--formerly of La Ciboulette in Paris and Ma Maison and Bistango here--has taken over the old Cafe Four Oaks and renamed it the Four Oaks Restaurant.
FOOD
June 7, 1990 | ROSE DOSTI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is a medieval French queen in Madeleine Kamman. You can see it in her strutting walk. All that is missing is the bejeweled crown, the ermine train and a golden staff to mark each step with a firm rap. She was showing a photographer and a reporter through the bright kitchens and dining rooms of Beringer Vineyard, where she directs the School for American Chefs and teaches a six-month master's course to eight hand-picked professional chefs.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here in the rolling hills of Normandy on the little farm where his wife was born, Michel Delorme makes his cheese the old-fashioned way, ladling the curdled raw milk by hand into cylindrical metal molds arranged in rows on a blanket of straw. "The secret is in the ladle," said Delorme on a recent rainy afternoon, raising the long-handled iron ladle and skillfully slopping a blob of lumpy milk into a half-filled cylinder. He is a short, bespectacled Norman farmer with a wild sprout of red hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
After she lost Tumbleweed, Elka Gilmore was hired to be the executive chef at Checkers, the fancy new downtown hotel. "Bill Wilkinson (the president of the corporation) and I are like opposite ends of the universe," Gilmore now says. "I loved the part of the job that was all structure and organization, but every time I'd cook he'd hate it. The more I'd try, the more he'd hate it. Finally he said to me, 'What do you think of when I say the words chop house?'
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before Nina Donney was killed, before her husband beat and stabbed her as their two children listened in horror, Nina's twin sister, Abby Leibman, was documenting an alarming escalation of violence against women. As co-founder of the nonprofit California Women's Law Center, Leibman had been helping draft state laws to shield women from what the center had identified as "an epidemic of violence at the hands of husbands and boyfriends."
FOOD
January 19, 1995 | KATHIE JENKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Things could be going better this Friday afternoon at Rex il Ristorante for a dozen jet-lagged chefs--all women--who are trying in vain to concentrate on their cooking tasks. All of them are strangers to Southern California; all speak little English. Most of the cooking products are unfamiliar and the chefs are lost in the gigantic downtown Los Angeles kitchen. Chef Anna Maria Casadei Belletti, for one, is in shock.
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