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NEWS
August 16, 2010 | By Matt Donnelly, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Michael Douglas has a tumor in his throat and will undergo eight weeks of radiation and chemotherapy, his rep tells People. Doctors recently discovered the mass in the film star's throat, his representative said. A full recovery is expected. "I am very optimistic," Douglas said in a statement. It's been a tumultuous year for the actor, whose son Cameron was sentenced in May to five years in prison after pleading guilty to possession of heroin and distribution of crystal meth.
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NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Michael Robertson put the bag of chemicals in an inside pocket of his sport coat, the pump in the other. He snaked the tubes between the buttons of his shirt to the port in his chest. He adjusted his tie to cover them. Then he sat down in a cavernous room in the White House complex and pulled his chair close to the table, hiding the bulges. Robertson, an aide to President Obama, was meeting with top officials from federal agencies working to implement the Affordable Care Act. He was also in treatment for stage IV colorectal cancer.
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HEALTH
January 30, 2006
Re: "Chemo That's Easier to Take" [Jan. 23]: You know how to ameliorate chemotherapy's side effects? By legalizing medical marijuana. In 1996, Californians approved compassionate use (Prop. 215), but the federal government and the Supreme Court would rather AIDS and cancer patients suffer, so Washington can keep its precious war. Marijuana is not a cure, but some find it is the missing ingredient in their treatments (chemo, radiation therapy, drug cocktails), which are nearly as devastating as the diseases they attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Actress Karen Black, who's been battling cancer for more than two years, has turned to the public for help to pay for an experimental treatment in Europe - and as of Monday afternoon, the crowdfunding plea was working. The 73-year-old, Oscar-nominated as supporting actress in 1970's "Five Easy Pieces" with Jack Nicholson, has worked steadily for more than 40 years but is best known for her work in 1970s films including "Airport 1975," "The Day of the Locust" and "Nashville. " Diagnosed with ampullary cancer in November 2010, she immediately had a third of her pancreas removed, her husband, Stephen Eckelberry, said on the " Help Karen Beat Cancer " GoFundMe webpage, launched on March 14. After chemo, she was declared disease-free in mid-2011.  It didn't last, he said.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
People who receive chemotherapy for cancer often misunderstand the role of the therapy in their treatment plan, according to a new study published in the journal Cancer. For people with cancer, chemotherapy can play different roles. For some, chemo is a way of trying to eliminate cancerous cells from the body, effectively curing the patient. But for many, chemotherapy is just one of many methods to prolong life, with no reasonable expectation that it can or will lead to a cure. In the study, the authors surveyed 125 recently diagnosed cancer patients and their doctors, looking for an answer to a simple question: Do the patient and the physician give the same answer when asked how chemotherapy can help the patient?
HEALTH
June 13, 2011 | Marc Siegel, The Unreal World
The premise Joe (Ray Romano) and Manfro (Jon Manfrellotti) are good friends who go to a strip club the night before Manfro is scheduled to begin chemotherapy to treat Stage 3 colon cancer. Manfro, whose tumor had spread to his lymph nodes by the time it was detected in a colonoscopy screening exam, has already had surgery to remove the bulk of his tumor. At the club, he meets a stripper whose father also has Stage 3 colon cancer and went to the same oncologist that is treating Manfro.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - Michael Robertson put the bag of chemicals in an inside pocket of his sport coat, the pump in the other. He snaked the tubes between the buttons of his shirt to the port in his chest. He adjusted his tie to cover them. Then he sat down in a cavernous room in the White House complex and pulled his chair close to the table, hiding the bulges. Robertson, an aide to President Obama, was meeting with top officials from federal agencies working to implement the Affordable Care Act. He was also in treatment for stage IV colorectal cancer.
NEWS
February 17, 2008 | Sarah Sumadi, Special to the Chicago Tribune
Two years ago, both of Dana Nelson's golden retrievers were diagnosed with cancer a day apart. She took them to the University of Wisconsin veterinary school in Madison for radiation and chemo, making the two-hour drive from her home in St. Charles, Ill., more than 20 times. At home she made them meals of raw meat, steamed vegetables and vitamins. Conventional treatment cost about $14,000, and Nelson said she couldn't even estimate how much she spent on holistic therapy, supplements and extra consultations for Jazz, who lived an extra 10 months, and Cameo, who survived 17. Nelson, a dog trainer, is still paying off vet bills.
SPORTS
January 15, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
ESPN anchor Stuart Scott announced on Twitter on Monday night that he is battling cancer for the third time. "Blessed by prayers..I'm back in the Fight. C reared its head again. Chemo evry 2 wks but I'll still work, still work out..still #LIVESTRONG" Scott was first diagnosed with the disease in 2007 when doctors discovered he had cancer of the appendix while performing an appendectomy. He underwent chemotherapy and all was well until 2011, when he revealed that doctors found tumors in his small intestine.
SPORTS
May 6, 2012 | By Diane Pucin
As an athlete, an Olympic swimmer with goals different from, say, someone who earns a living as a businessman or artist or construction worker, Eric Shanteau made decisions that might raise an eyebrow. In 2008, less than a week before the U.S. Olympic trials, Shanteau learned he had testicular cancer. Surgery was recommended. Immediately if possible. Shanteau chose to wait. He made the U.S. team and competed at the Beijing Olympics, where his father was able to watch and cheer for his son. Richard Shanteau had lung cancer in 2008, a disease that would kill him in 2010.
HEALTH
February 16, 2013 | By Jessica P. Ogilvie
When Charlie Lustman, who ran the Silent Movie Theater on Fairfax Avenue until it closed in June 2006, was diagnosed with a rare bone cancer that year, he thought that his world would be forever changed for the worse. Doctors removed half of his jaw, fitting him with a prosthetic. But rather than let it get the best of him, Lustman turned the experience into something positive. A lifelong musician, the 47-year-old wrote a musical called "Made Me Nuclear," a one-man show about his illness and subsequent surgery that goes on national tour again in September (details at www.mademenuclear.com )
SPORTS
January 15, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
ESPN anchor Stuart Scott announced on Twitter on Monday night that he is battling cancer for the third time. "Blessed by prayers..I'm back in the Fight. C reared its head again. Chemo evry 2 wks but I'll still work, still work out..still #LIVESTRONG" Scott was first diagnosed with the disease in 2007 when doctors discovered he had cancer of the appendix while performing an appendectomy. He underwent chemotherapy and all was well until 2011, when he revealed that doctors found tumors in his small intestine.
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Karin Klein
While the voters argued over who won which debate, while the presidential conventions produced their speeches, while Californians pondered tax initiatives and condom use in the pornography industry, and the shuttle Endeavour wowed us as it flew over our heads but angered the people on the ground whose trees would make way for its slow procession through Los Angeles, Andrew Lyon was out of the picture, thinking about issues as immediate as whether he...
NEWS
October 12, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
People who receive chemotherapy for cancer often misunderstand the role of the therapy in their treatment plan, according to a new study published in the journal Cancer. For people with cancer, chemotherapy can play different roles. For some, chemo is a way of trying to eliminate cancerous cells from the body, effectively curing the patient. But for many, chemotherapy is just one of many methods to prolong life, with no reasonable expectation that it can or will lead to a cure. In the study, the authors surveyed 125 recently diagnosed cancer patients and their doctors, looking for an answer to a simple question: Do the patient and the physician give the same answer when asked how chemotherapy can help the patient?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2012 | By Jessica Gelt
In what's becoming known as one of the sweetest acts of friendship to set the blogosphere abuzz, "American Idol" alum Kellie Pickler shaved her head in support of her best friend, Summer Holt Miller, who had a mastectomy after being diagnosed with breast cancer. On Wednesday the women cut off their locks for the world to see on "Good Morning America," and since then Twitter has been filled with support for Miller. The same day, a touched Pickler tweeted, "I cannot thank everyone enough for all the love and support you've given Summer.
SPORTS
May 6, 2012 | By Diane Pucin
As an athlete, an Olympic swimmer with goals different from, say, someone who earns a living as a businessman or artist or construction worker, Eric Shanteau made decisions that might raise an eyebrow. In 2008, less than a week before the U.S. Olympic trials, Shanteau learned he had testicular cancer. Surgery was recommended. Immediately if possible. Shanteau chose to wait. He made the U.S. team and competed at the Beijing Olympics, where his father was able to watch and cheer for his son. Richard Shanteau had lung cancer in 2008, a disease that would kill him in 2010.
OPINION
January 17, 2004
Let's see ... a poor child with cancer may have his chemo axed, a family of three struggling to make it on $704 a month will have their benefits slashed, and newly hired state workers will be relegated to a miserable retirement package. Arnold, I'd like to know why the well-off are exempt from your "painful" budget decisions. Who says you're not a true Republican? Judy Melton Pasadena
HEALTH
December 27, 2010 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A handful of San Francisco breast cancer patients are donning frigid skullcaps to test a device designed to keep hair tightly rooted during chemotherapy. Researchers hope the study, run by UC San Francisco and Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, N.C., will eventually lead to Food and Drug Administration approval for the chilly caps. There is now no way to hang on to one's tresses during chemo for any kind of cancer, says study leader Hope Rugo, an oncologist at UCSF. The prospect of baldness is distressing to many patients, particularly women.
NEWS
February 27, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Chemotherapy patients have long complained of the mental fog that tends to accompany treatment, but a new study suggests that certain combinations of chemo drugs may have long-term effects on cognition. Researchers looked at 196 women who had been treated for early-stage breast cancer with a three-drug chemotherapy regimen. The women underwent cognition testing an average of 21 years after they had received chemo. They were compared with 1,509 healthy women who had never had cancer.
NEWS
November 14, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Here's new evidence that the condition known as “chemo brain” is real: A study of breast cancer patients finds that women who had chemotherapy along with surgery to treat their disease had more trouble kicking their brains into high gear than women who were treated with surgery alone. They also performed much worse on tests of mental function than a group of healthy women who served as controls. The study , published Monday in Archives of Neurology, included 25 breast cancer survivors who had surgery and chemotherapy, 19 breast cancer survivors who had surgery but no chemotherapy, and 18 women with no history of breast cancer who were picked because their ages, level of education and menopausal status were similar to those of the women who had chemo.
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