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NEWS
August 20, 1999 | JACK PETERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A controversial $2.4-million chess tournament without the sport's three biggest stars winnowed its numbers from 100 combatants to two Thursday. The finalists will face off for the 1999 World Chess Federation world championship beginning Sunday in Las Vegas. Alexander Khalifman, a 33-year-old grandmaster from Russia, defeated Liviu-Dieter Nisipeanu, a 23-year-old Romanian grandmaster, in a tiebreaker after they had deadlocked their four-game semifinal, 2-2.
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NEWS
January 30, 1989 | From Associated Press
Former world champion Anatoly Karpov of the Soviet Union and Iceland's Johann Hjartarson played to a draw after 15 moves Saturday in the first game of their World Chess Championship Candidates quarterfinal. Hjartarson, 25, playing white, offered the draw and Karpov, 37, accepted. The opening, described as the doubly delayed exchange variation of the Ruy Lopez, moved quickly and the game was over in 1 hour and 25 minutes. The match is to continue today.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | Associated Press
World chess champion Gary Kasparov took his final timeout Wednesday, postponing the 22nd game of his title contest against challenger Anatoly Karpov until Friday, organizers said. With just three games remaining, the score is even at 10 1/2 points for each player. Kasparov retains the advantage in the 24-game contest, however, because in the event of a 12-12 tie, he will keep his crown.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | United Press International
The World Chess Championship game scheduled for Friday was postponed until Monday when challenger Anatoly Karpov took the first of his three allotted timeouts from play with champion Garry Kasparov. A spokesman for the championship tournament said that Karpov's second, grandmaster Lajos Portisch, informed chief arbiter Geurt Gijssen by telephone, seven minutes before the noon notification deadline, that Karpov was taking a timeout.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By David C. Nichols
There's a wryly energetic thrust to “Chess,” being revived by East West Players in an imaginative production that certainly puts its own spin on this problematic concept album-turned-popera. Here we get the almost through-sung U.K. version (Richard Nelson's book is virtually interjections). This favors the show's enduring asset: Benny Andersson, Björn Ulvaeus and Tim Rice's soaring, wailing score. Director Tim Dang stylishly maneuvers his stalwart, multicultural players around set designer Adam Flemming's levels and arches, aided by Flemming's videos and Dan Weingarten's spectacular lighting.
NEWS
September 10, 1995 | JACK PETERS, INTERNATIONAL MASTER
Lev Polugaevsky, one of the best grandmasters from the Soviet Union, died Aug. 30 in Paris, where he had lived for several years. He was 60 years old. Polugaevsky was a diligent, persistent man, popular with his peers. As a player, he stood out for his prowess in counterattack and his thorough preparation of chess openings. Almost single-handedly, he popularized a complicated line of the Najdorf Sicilian, 6 Bg5 e6 7 f4 b5!?, now known as the Polugaevsky variation.
NEWS
January 29, 1995 | JACK PETERS, INTERNATIONAL MASTER
The final match in the knockout tournament in Wijk aan Zee, the Netherlands, will pit two members of the Russian Olympiad team against each other. Evgeny Bareyev will play Alexey Dreyev for first prize. Bareyev reached the final by defeating another Russian grandmaster, Alexander Khalifman, while Dreyev eliminated Nigel Short of England. In the quarterfinal round, Dreyev traded victories with former U.S. champion Yasser Seirawan, then won two speed games to break the tie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1990 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
English teacher Steve Hughes was discouraged when only three students attended his first chess team meeting at San Fernando Junior High School in the fall of 1988. But Hughes, a first-year teacher at the time, was determined to bring chess to this largely Latino, blue-collar neighborhood. Interest in the game had kept him from dropping out of high school, said Hughes, who went on to become president of the UCLA Chess Club.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | Associated Press
The 17th game of the chess rematch between Bobby Fischer and Boris Spassky was delayed Thursday after Spassky complained of exhaustion. The match was rescheduled for Saturday. The postponement came one day after Fischer, who beat Spassky for the world championship 20 years ago, defeated his old rival again to take a 6-3 lead in their $5-million match. The postponement was Spassky's second; each player is allowed four.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1992 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
As 12 boys watched intently, Calvin Olson stood in front of a chess board and made his move--using a pawn, he seized a bishop and added it to other captured pieces next to the board. Although the room remained quiet, the boys telegraphed their admiration for the move with a raised eyebrow here, a nod there. For Olson, however, there was little time to dwell on the admirable move because he had to quickly switch to another board to ponder his next move and his next opponent.
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