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OPINION
February 26, 2013
Re “ Senator quits for job with Chevron ,” Feb. 23 When I finished this article, I was convinced there must have been something I missed. So I read it again. State Sen. Michael J. Rubio's resignation and immediate hiring by a huge corporation that it was his elected job to (among other things) protect us against is heinous enough. But for him to say that “family comes first” and to complain that he was “tired” of the drive to his job in Sacramento has to be infuriating to the people who elected him. Clearly there's something wrong with this picture, and the apparent casualness with which Rubio, those tasked with reviewing his decision and The Times are handling it speaks volumes about how thoroughly our elected servants are beholden to big business, and how little will be done about it. Mike Flanagan Silver Lake More letters to the editor ...  
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BUSINESS
March 4, 2014 | By Shan Li
A U.S. judge ruled in favor of Chevron Corp. and declared a $9.5-billion judgment in Ecuador against the oil giant for environmental damage was obtained by fraud and racketeering. U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan in Manhattan ruled Tuesday that the 2011 judgment against the San Ramon, Calif., company on behalf of thousands of villagers living in the Lago Agrio region of the Amazon rain forest was procured by "corrupt means," including coercion and money laundering. Kaplan said that Steven Donziger, a New York lawyer, along with attorneys in Ecuador, poisoned the case by promising money to a judge for a favorable ruling and submitting faulty evidence, among other actions.
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BUSINESS
November 23, 2011 | Bloomberg News
Brazil's oil regulator said it will fine Chevron Corp. for falsifying information about a spill in deep waters off the coast of Rio de Janeiro and for failing to meet a plan to counter the accident. The value of the fines for the two violations will be set after the end of a probe into the leak, the regulator, known as ANP, said Tuesday. The environment agency, which fined Chevron 50 million reais ($28 million) on Monday, and the Brazilian Navy are also investigating the spill, ANP said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
Sometime after Kulwinder Singh lands in India today, he will call his son Parmeet to let him know he arrived safely. When he does, Parmeet will pick up the phone and say one of two things: “Dad, what would you do with $1 million?” Or simply… “Hey, you're a millionaire.” By Thursday afternoon, most of the country is already aware the sole $425.3-million jackpot winning Powerball ticket was sold at the Dixon Landing Chevron in Milpitas, making the store owner the lucky winner of a $1-million prize.
OPINION
May 20, 2010
Journalism that serves society does not always spring from objectivity, nor is it always written from a distance. When Upton Sinclair exposed the conditions of Chicago's meat industry, he did so on assignment from a socialist newspaper. He went to work in grim stockyards and returned with "The Jungle." The result was a revolution in food safety and the founding of the Food and Drug Administration. Sinclair's closeness to his story gave his journalism urgency and moral power. It was precisely the sort of work that deserves the greatest protection from corporate intrusion.
OPINION
September 5, 2009
Only weeks ago, the 16-year legal battle between Chevron Corp. and thousands of indigenous people in Ecuador's Amazon seemed as if it were coming to a close. After years of delay, all that remained was for the judge -- there are no jury trials in Ecuador -- to deliver a verdict on whether the oil company is responsible for wide-scale contamination. But Chevron, which is widely expected to lose and could be assessed a staggering $27 billion in damages, is not going down without some legal pyrotechnics.
OPINION
October 2, 2009
When Chevron was in a New York courtroom battling a lawsuit by thousands of indigenous Ecuadoreans, it argued that the case rightly belonged in their country. But now that the company is poised to lose in the Andean nation and could be assessed as much as $27 billion in damages, it says Ecuador isn't the right place either. Last week, the oil giant shopped the case to yet another court, filing a claim at the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague. Chevron has long maintained that it would appeal an adverse decision, which is entirely understandable.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2011 | David Lazarus
It's easy to get cheesed about high gas prices when oil companies are raking in billions of dollars in profit. Chevron, for one, wants you to know that it's thinking the same. "Oil companies should put their profits to good use," the company declares in recent newspaper ads. And in response to that laudable sentiment, Chevron's chief financial officer, Patricia Yarrington, says, "We agree. " The ads go on to say that "California's economy needs energy to grow. And we're providing it. Reinvesting over $7 billion into the state over the past 5 years.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- California safety officials ordered Chevron Corp. to pay nearly $1 million in penalties for safety violations that led to a massive fire last summer at a refinery at Richmond in the San Francisco Bay Area. In all, the state Division of Occupational Safety and Health issued 25 citations against California's biggest oil company, including 11 "willful serious" and 12 lesser "serious" violations related to the Aug. 6 blaze, the state said. The fine, which could be appealed by Chevron, is the highest in Cal-OSHA history, the agency said.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2012 | Bloomberg
Chevron Corp.'s effort to overturn an $18 billion judgment against it was rejected by an Ecuador appeals court in a lawsuit alleging the company is responsible for chemicals spilled in the Amazon River basin more than 20 years ago. The "adverse ruling" upholding the lower-court judgment was issued by a panel of three judges in the Provincial Court of Justice of Sucumbios in Lago Agrio, Ecuador, Chevron said in an e-mailed statement yesterday....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2014 | By Bob Pool
The guy who runs the street-corner gas stations at the bustling Fairfax-area intersection gets them going and coming. The filling station owner operates not one but two Chevron stations at the corner of La Brea Avenue and Beverly Boulevard, a sight that often leaves motorists doing double takes. And that may have been Ben Pouldar's plan 15 months ago when he opened a Chevron service station right across the street from the Chevron station he already owned. "It really is incredibly weird," said Davon Williams as he gazed across the street while pumping $3.699-a-gallon unleaded into his car. "I actually saw the other Chevron station first but I was in the wrong lane to turn into it," said Williams, an actor and writer who moved to Hollywood 11 months ago from Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
November 21, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - Just 90 companies worldwide produced fuels that generated two-thirds of industrial greenhouse gas emissions from 1854 to 2010, according to a new study. The 90 biggest producers of fuels driving climate change include investor-owned corporations, such as Exxon Mobil and Chevron, and state-owned oil companies, such as Saudi Aramco and Mexico's Pemex. The study attributes 914 billion metric tons of greenhouse gases to the fuels extracted by the companies, which is 63% of the total 1,450 billion metric tons of emissions estimated since the mid-19th century.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - Officials are letting a fire burn out at a Chevron liquefied gas pipeline that exploded in a rural north Texas town Thursday when a construction crew accidentally drilled into the conduit. The town of Milford, about 50 miles south of Dallas, was evacuated, with many of its 700 residents going to a gym in the nearby town of Italy. They are not expected to be allowed back until Friday morning at the earliest, Milford Fire Chief Mark Jackson said. He said no injuries were reported after the 9:40 a.m. blast.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON - Officials are letting a fire burn out at a  Chevron gas pipeline line that exploded  in the rural north Texas town of Milford on Thursday and prompted evacuations. No injuries have been reported after the 9:40 a.m. CST explosion in Milford, home to about 700 residents 50 miles south of Dallas, officials said. Sara Garcia, special projects director for the county judge who has been receiving updates on the fire, told the Los Angeles Times that Chevron representatives were on site.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | Bloomberg News
Chevron Corp. posted its biggest second-quarter profit decline in four years and missed analysts' estimates as crude oil prices and production fell. Net income dropped 26% to $5.37 billion, or $2.77 a share, from $7.21 billion, or $3.66, a year earlier, the San Ramon, Calif., company said Friday. The per-share result was 19 cents below the average of estimates compiled by Bloomberg. Chevron's oil and natural gas output fell 1.6% to the lowest second-quarter average in half a decade as new wells in Angola, the Gulf of Mexico and Pennsylvania failed to make up for declining production from older fields, according to the statement.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2013 | By Shan Li
The chief executive of oil giant Chevron Corp. says that oil and gas producers must regulate themselves more tightly over hydraulic fracturing to address "legitimate concerns" that the practice is unsafe and harmful to the environment. At an event for the Center for Strategic and International Studies, John Watson said the energy industry must work harder to police itself as the public learns more about so-called fracking, the controversial technique that involves injecting large volumes of chemically laced water and sand deep into the ground to release oil or gas. "There are some risks out there.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2012
NEW YORK — A federal judge in New York has refused, for now, to halt collection of an $18 billion court judgment against the energy giant Chevron for environmental damage in an Ecuadorean rain forest. In one sense, the case shows the potential costs that can accrue from the massive consolidation of the oil industry into just a handful of mega-firms. Oil companies that have acquired former competitors wind up shouldering legal liabilities as well as assets. In this case, Courts in Ecuador have ordered San Rramon-based Chevron to pay the steep penalty for pollution that occurred when Texaco was operating in the forest, between 1972 and 1990.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2010 | Reuters
Discussions of safety were prominent at Chevron Corp's annual shareholder meeting in Houston on Wednesday as a blown-out BP well continued to spew oil into the Gulf of Mexico. John Watson, who took over as chief executive and chairman of the second-largest U.S. oil company this year, highlighted Chevron's improving safety record in an industry that he said could never completely eliminate risk. "But we can mitigate risk," Watson told the meeting as he discussed last month's explosion on a BP-operated offshore rig that led to the spill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Ethics officials are reviewing financial dealings between a state senator who abruptly resigned last week to work for Chevron and an oil executive whose firm lent him hundreds of thousands of dollars while he was in office. Officials at the Fair Political Practices Commission said Thursday they are studying a complaint that Michael Rubio, a Democrat from the Central Valley town of Shafter, may have improperly benefited from real estate deals with a refinery executive.
OPINION
February 26, 2013
Re “ Senator quits for job with Chevron ,” Feb. 23 When I finished this article, I was convinced there must have been something I missed. So I read it again. State Sen. Michael J. Rubio's resignation and immediate hiring by a huge corporation that it was his elected job to (among other things) protect us against is heinous enough. But for him to say that “family comes first” and to complain that he was “tired” of the drive to his job in Sacramento has to be infuriating to the people who elected him. Clearly there's something wrong with this picture, and the apparent casualness with which Rubio, those tasked with reviewing his decision and The Times are handling it speaks volumes about how thoroughly our elected servants are beholden to big business, and how little will be done about it. Mike Flanagan Silver Lake More letters to the editor ...  
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