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Chevy Chase

December 5, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Two eligible single people are off the market today, as ESPN's Samantha Steele said she is engaged to Minnesota Vikings quarterback Christian Ponder. Here is how the proposal went: Ponder spelled out "Marry Me" in Christmas lights on his house. Neither Chevy Chase nor the rest of the cast of "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation" were involved. Steele and Ponder met earlier this year on the set of ESPN's "College Gameday. " The Vikings have stumbled to 6-6 this season after beginning the campaign 4-1, making many wonder if Ponder's relationship with Steele is a distraction.
April 28, 1994 | LYNN SMITH, Lynn Smith is a staff writer for The Times' View section
In "Cops and Robbersons," an outwardly perfect but truly dysfunctional suburban family with a bumbling, ineffectual, cop-wannabe dad (Chevy Chase) allows a crusty old policeman and his assistant to move in to monitor a gangster who has moved in next door. (Rated PG.) So what if the critics have been lukewarm? Kids, especially in the 10- to 13-year-old range, said this "dumb comedy" was plenty good enough for them. "It was better than average, I guess," said Morgan McGilvray, 13.
March 21, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Chevy Chase name still appears to guarantee a big opening. Chase's "Fletch Lives" enjoyed the second largest opening of the year so far, behind Tom Hanks' "The 'burbs." "Fletch Lives" grossed $8 million at 1,479 screens, or $5,440 per screen. That's a strong showing, considering this is a a slow time of year for the movie business. It's also slightly better than "Fletch" did when it opened in spring, 1985.
January 1, 2007 | From Reuters
Chevy Chase, who portrayed Gerald Ford as a klutz on "Saturday Night Live," says he does not enjoy the renewed attention the ex-president's death has brought him. "I'm just a guy who made some fun of Gerald Ford in 1976, and I prefer to be left alone, really," the 63-year-old comedian said last week from a Colorado ski resort where he had been skiing with his daughter. Chase said he gets upset when people say that Ford "made" his career.
April 9, 1989
Your review of my book "Perilous Statecraft: An Insider's Account of the Iran-Contra Affair" (Book Review, Dec. 18, 1988) by Larry Bensky of the far left-wing Pacifica radio is not a review at all but an extended diatribe against me and my alleged ideas and activities. Your readers can get a sense of the garbage in which Bensky traffics from this: "It now seems clear that Ledeen was more deeply involved, more mysteriously involved, in communications between Israel and the Reagan Administration than we have previously been told."
August 9, 1998 | ANNE BEATTS, Anne Beatts is a writer who lives in Hollywood
OK, so I didn't go to Steven and Kate's or Alec and Kim's place in the Hamptons last weekend to hang out with Bill and Hillary. I had promised myself I'd spend the weekend catching up on some important personal correspondence (if I was sent an orange envelope mailed on a Monday containing the correct grand-prize-winning code number, I, Ms. Anne Beatts, may have already won $11 million).
September 17, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Fox premieres two new sitcoms Tuesday. One I would recommend; the other, I would not. Let's begin with the better: "Brooklyn Nine-Nine," which deems Andy Samberg ready for prime time, is set in a New York police precinct; its noble lineage runs back to "Car 54, Where Are You?" and "Barney Miller," but it shares DNA with every comedy in which a group of nonconformists and nincompoops are charged with some responsible task. The faces are fresh, but the school is old. Samberg's detective, whose wisecracking ways do not belie but certify his effectiveness ("The only problem he hasn't solved is how to grow up," says his sergeant, played by Terry Crews)
March 11, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik
When it comes to '70s and '80s remakes, I'm of the common Gen-X mind-set that there are some modern iconic characters who should never be inhabited by new actors (Marty McFly, say, or Vito Corleone). On the other hand, there are some movies and characters who could get remade, rebooted and redone endlessly, with different actors swapping in as if they were on a Superfly Snuka tag team (Jason Voorhees, e.g.) and not make me bat an eye. And many fall somewhere in the middle, not so iconic one can never imagine a new actor in the part but not so disposable that one doesn't take serious pause when it happens.
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