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Chewing Gum

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BUSINESS
September 30, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
The nation's largest dentist group now says chewing gum can be good for you, as long as it's sugar-free. The American Dental Assn. said it had awarded its seal of acceptance to Wrigley sugar-free gums Orbit, Extra and Eclipse -- based on studies funded at least partially by the maker of Wrigley gums, Chicago-based Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co. It's the first time the ADA has allowed its seal to appear on gum, having cleared its use on thousands of products since 1930.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 6, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Your browser does not support iframes. As if Yasiel Puig, or any other major league outfielder, doesn't have enough to worry about, add one thing to the list. Umpire Jordan Baker is quickly gaining fame for a pretty gross habit: After each half inning, he turns and throws his chewing gum into the outfield. The gum-throwing, first reported by Lobshots.com , means that at the end of each game Baker leaves 18 wads of chewing gum in the outfield. Who has to clean this up? You have to bet if an outfielder has to dive for a ball during a game and lands on several wads of gum, he won't be happy.
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BUSINESS
January 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Singapore Gum Ban Protested: Warner-Lambert Co. plans to appeal a new law in Singapore that bans the import and sale of chewing gum. The company, which produces gum under the Chicklets label, said it wants an extension that would allow it time to sell remaining supplies in that country. Singapore last week outlawed the manufacture, sale and importation of chewing gum. The government said "spent chewing gum has caused (subway) train disruptions as they prevent the train doors from closing.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
White House victories are rare these days, but President Obama can claim solid progress in his lonely battle to quit smoking. The president has gone nine months without sneaking a cigarette, White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs reported Thursday. Every day is a struggle and there's no guarantee the president won't light up tomorrow, it seems. Still, for a president who has been trying to quit for years, the nine-month hiatus is a welcome sign that he's breaking the addiction.
SPORTS
June 6, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
Your browser does not support iframes. As if Yasiel Puig, or any other major league outfielder, doesn't have enough to worry about, add one thing to the list. Umpire Jordan Baker is quickly gaining fame for a pretty gross habit: After each half inning, he turns and throws his chewing gum into the outfield. The gum-throwing, first reported by Lobshots.com , means that at the end of each game Baker leaves 18 wads of chewing gum in the outfield. Who has to clean this up? You have to bet if an outfielder has to dive for a ball during a game and lands on several wads of gum, he won't be happy.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | JOHN HURST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bill to keep bubble gum cigarettes out of the hands of children had heavyweight backing. Supporters included the California Medical Assn., American Cancer Society, American Heart Assn., American Lung Assn., California Council on Alcohol Problems, League of California Cities and the California Children's Lobby. The sole organized opposition: the National Assn. of Chewing Gum Manufacturers. But the bill never got out of the Senate Judiciary Committee.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Unexpected Ad in Cigarette Maker's Magazine: It's one of the last places you'd expect to find a "No Smoking" sign: the inside cover of tobacco giant Philip Morris USA's quarterly magazine. But it's no mistake. Since last year, the William Wrigley Jr. Co. has conducted an ad campaign to promote chewing gum as an alternative to smoking. "It's been a very successful campaign," said William Piet, vice president of corporate affairs and secretary of Chicago-based Wrigley.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2006 | From the Associated Press
In a bid to resolve a sticky mess, a judge has decided that an Argentine company can continue making its sweet-tasting Bazooka gum even though its relationship with Topps Co., which made the brand famous, has long since soured. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Charles S. Haight Jr. described not just the decades-long history of the companies but also the millenniums-old history of gum, stretching back to when the ancient Greeks chewed on a substance made from the resin of the mastic tree.
HEALTH
June 25, 2001 | Shari Roan
Discouraging kids from chewing gum is the kind of thing parents usually love to do. After all, there are so many reasons to ban gum from the house, such as: a) Kids don't discard gum properly and it ends up embedded in the carpet; b) They blow bubbles that pop and get in their hair; and c) Lots of gum that kids love is sugar-laden and not good for their teeth.
NEWS
December 2, 1994 | ALICIA DI RADO and DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At least seven Marina High School students, including five drill team members, were recovering Thursday after they unknowingly chewed LSD-laced bubble gum that had been given to them by other students, parents and authorities said. Several law enforcement officials said it was the first time they had heard of chewing gum used to transmit drugs. But some students on campus said that lacing bubble gum with LSD, or "acid," is a new fad. Police said the episode began Tuesday about 10 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2010 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Josh and Ada Cottrell were expecting their first child four years ago, they wanted to give their son a name that embodied their beliefs and stood for something attainable. They wanted their little guy to be known not so much as a dreamer but a doer. So the Sherman Oaks couple named their son … Macgyver. "We got a lot of flak for it," Ada says. "People would tell us, 'You're setting him up to fail.' But my husband is a 'MacGyver.' And if he's going to be anything like his daddy, which I'm sure he is, he's going to be the kind of guy who can put together a sink with a paper clip and some chewing gum and 'MacGyver' it, so it'll work."
HEALTH
April 27, 2009 | Shari Roan
Studies have suggested that something about chewing gum reduces stress, improves alertness and relieves anxiety. But most of this research has been found in a laboratory setting. Now, the first study in people also supports the idea that chewing gum boosts academic performance. The study was conducted by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and was sponsored by the Wrigley Science Institute.
NEWS
April 26, 2009 | Shari Roan; Tom Petruno; Noha El-Hennawy; Alana Semuels
Studies have suggested that something about chewing gum reduces stress, improves alertness and relieves anxiety. But most of this research has been found in a laboratory setting. Now, the first study in people also supports the idea that chewing gum boosts academic performance. The study was conducted by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and was sponsored by the Wrigley Science Institute, part of the Wrigley chewing gum giant. The study included 108 students, ages 13 to 16, who were assigned to either chew sugar-free gum during math class, while doing math homework and during math tests or to refrain from gum-chewing.
HEALTH
March 10, 2008 | Chris Woolston, Special to The Times
The product: Contestants on the current season of NBC's "The Biggest Loser" have been taking a slightly offbeat approach to shedding pounds. In addition to sweating on treadmills and sticking to near-starvation diets, they've been chewing gobs of gum -- Wrigley's Extra sugar-free gum, to be exact. Product placement on reality TV is nothing new; even the castaways on "Survivor" have enjoyed regular doses of Doritos. But on "The Biggest Loser," the gum has become a prominent part of the show.
HEALTH
October 29, 2007 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
Chewing gum, taking medication and laying off fast food won't by themselves reduce America's waistlines -- obviously. But they may all have a part to play. As hundreds of medical, scientific and behavioral researchers gathered at the Obesity Society's annual meeting in New Orleans last week to present their work, they increased the collective understanding of how appetite, metabolism, the environment and our genes may contribute to the nation's increasing girth.
BUSINESS
September 30, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
The nation's largest dentist group now says chewing gum can be good for you, as long as it's sugar-free. The American Dental Assn. said it had awarded its seal of acceptance to Wrigley sugar-free gums Orbit, Extra and Eclipse -- based on studies funded at least partially by the maker of Wrigley gums, Chicago-based Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co. It's the first time the ADA has allowed its seal to appear on gum, having cleared its use on thousands of products since 1930.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1988 | Compiled from staff and wire reports
Chewing gum after meals may be the next best thing to brushing for preventing tooth decay--that is, if the gum contains the natural sweetener xylitol, according to a University of Michigan study. Xylitol has been shown to reduce cavities by 50%, said Kauko K. Makinen, a professor of dentistry and biochemistry at the school. Makinen based his findings on a study of 324 11- and 12-year-old children in Ylivieska, a rural community in northern Finland, conducted between 1982 and 1987.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | NONA YATES
P OP! Every parent of a bubble-gum chewing child dreads that sound. It signifies a struggle to remove sticky pink stuff from cheeks, lips, noses, even hair. But kids love bubble gum. In 1991 they chewed 150,000 pounds--15 million pieces--of the primarily pink gum each day , according to Zillions, Consumer Reports for Kids. Parents hate it.
HEALTH
February 19, 2007 | Emily Sohn, Special to The Times
You are what you chew -- that's what the crowded gum aisle seems to suggest. Spicy cinnamon sticks, spearmint pellets with whitening sparkles, explode-in-your-mouth strawberry-lime pillows: There's a flavor and form to suit every personality. Soon, gums may offer more than just tongue-tingling tastes and tooth-brightening properties. Scientists are probing for evidence that habitual chewing can make us healthier and more alert, not to mention thinner and better at remembering names.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2006 | From the Associated Press
In a bid to resolve a sticky mess, a judge has decided that an Argentine company can continue making its sweet-tasting Bazooka gum even though its relationship with Topps Co., which made the brand famous, has long since soured. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Charles S. Haight Jr. described not just the decades-long history of the companies but also the millenniums-old history of gum, stretching back to when the ancient Greeks chewed on a substance made from the resin of the mastic tree.
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