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Chewing Gum

NEWS
July 24, 1999 | From Reuters
Warner-Lambert Co. said Friday it is taking Trident for Kids and Trident Advantage off the market after two children had allergic reactions after chewing the new gums, which contain a milk protein derivative. The consumer goods and drug maker, based in Morris Plains, N.J., said the new gums contain Recaldent, an ingredient derived from milk-casein and added to strengthen teeth.
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HEALTH
April 27, 2009 | Shari Roan
Studies have suggested that something about chewing gum reduces stress, improves alertness and relieves anxiety. But most of this research has been found in a laboratory setting. Now, the first study in people also supports the idea that chewing gum boosts academic performance. The study was conducted by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and was sponsored by the Wrigley Science Institute.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | Associated Press
The flood of American soldiers to the Persian Gulf is being followed by a torrent of mail from home. Besides letters of love and assurance, the items most in demand are audio tapes, suntan lotion, Life Savers and chewing gum, the Postal Service reported. The Postal Service said it is handling 50,000 items daily intended for servicemen and women in the Gulf area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1999 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William Wrigley, chairman of the world's largest chewing gum company and a major benefactor of USC and the university's research facilities on Santa Catalina Island, died of pneumonia Monday in Chicago. He was 66. For years, his family owned virtually the entire 42,000-acre island and the Chicago Cubs baseball team, which trained there until 1952.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | MERCER CROSS, National Geographic
The healed herringbone scars, crisscrossing high up the trunks of the tall sapodilla trees, are the diaries of the bold chicleros who slashed them with their machetes years ago. Chicle--milky liquid latex--once trickled freely down the sluices hacked in the trees, collecting in canvas bags at the base. Boiled down and molded into rubbery gray blocks for export, it was the basic ingredient of chewing gum until a few years ago. Chicleros , the rugged, resourceful men who risked their lives and endangered their health in their quest for the once-essential substance, have passed into the folklore of their verdant homeland.
NEWS
April 26, 2009 | Shari Roan; Tom Petruno; Noha El-Hennawy; Alana Semuels
Studies have suggested that something about chewing gum reduces stress, improves alertness and relieves anxiety. But most of this research has been found in a laboratory setting. Now, the first study in people also supports the idea that chewing gum boosts academic performance. The study was conducted by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and was sponsored by the Wrigley Science Institute, part of the Wrigley chewing gum giant. The study included 108 students, ages 13 to 16, who were assigned to either chew sugar-free gum during math class, while doing math homework and during math tests or to refrain from gum-chewing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1985 | DOUG SMITH
Shortly after school let out Monday, five girls ages 11 to 13 reported to a second-floor studio in Northridge. There, they are learning how to turn their youthful dash and energy into ladylike charm and make themselves look beautiful. They sat in pink and white directors chairs on a white linoleum floor, facing their own reflections in a wall-length mirror.
HEALTH
October 29, 2007 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
Chewing gum, taking medication and laying off fast food won't by themselves reduce America's waistlines -- obviously. But they may all have a part to play. As hundreds of medical, scientific and behavioral researchers gathered at the Obesity Society's annual meeting in New Orleans last week to present their work, they increased the collective understanding of how appetite, metabolism, the environment and our genes may contribute to the nation's increasing girth.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2010 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Josh and Ada Cottrell were expecting their first child four years ago, they wanted to give their son a name that embodied their beliefs and stood for something attainable. They wanted their little guy to be known not so much as a dreamer but a doer. So the Sherman Oaks couple named their son … Macgyver. "We got a lot of flak for it," Ada says. "People would tell us, 'You're setting him up to fail.' But my husband is a 'MacGyver.' And if he's going to be anything like his daddy, which I'm sure he is, he's going to be the kind of guy who can put together a sink with a paper clip and some chewing gum and 'MacGyver' it, so it'll work."
NEWS
June 7, 1998 | MALCOLM RITTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The bank robber wore a mask, a parka and blue jeans. The pants told Richard Vorder Bruegge of the FBI everything he needed to know. Just as a wad of gum spoke to Dr. Dennis Asen. And a piece of weatherstripping helped a prosecutor nail a rapist. To the untrained eye, none of these items looked unusual. But they revealed enough to play a part in criminal cases that concluded within the last year or so.
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