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Chez Panisse

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1986 | RUTH REICHL
Today they call it the Gourmet Ghetto, but 15 years ago Berkeley was just a pretty college town with a left-wing reputation. Then Alice Waters opened a little cafe named for a character she had seen in an old French movie, and the entire town became obsessed with eating. Food lovers from all over the country gathered the other day (Aug.
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FOOD
April 26, 2014 | Noelle Carter
Rabbits "are helping win the war," proclaimed a Los Angeles Times article from 1943. Touted as a patriotic food during World War II, rabbits were raised by thousands of Americans in their backyards. Along with victory gardens, rabbits helped put food on the table when much of the nation's supply was shipped to soldiers overseas and ration stamps provided less at home. But even though rabbit consumption spiked during the war, it all but disappeared afterward. Think rabbit today and your thoughts probably veer to cartoon characters, cereal mascots, Easter and adorable pets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2001 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, TIMES RESTAURANT CRITIC
On Sunday, Alice Waters and friends threw a 30th birthday party for Chez Panisse outdoors on the esplanade beneath the campanile on the UC Berkeley campus. Some 600 guests arrived for aperitifs at 1 o'clock, to toast and celebrate the muse of California cuisine with glasses of sparkling prosecco. The hors d'oeuvres were straight from the farm: figs, olives, almonds, tiny tomatoes on the stem. Waiters passed baskets of panisse --golden squares of the famous chickpea flatbread of Nice.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
We may not have heard the last of Ruth Bourdain . When Josh Friedland, the author of the long-running Twitter parody decloaked Thursday in the New York Times , some assumed he might be hanging it up for good. In fact, Friedman himself might have assumed that. But today he's already having second thoughts. Much to the relief of tens of thousands of followers. “I'm leaving my options open,” Friedland said from his home in Maplewood, N.J. “This [decloaking] wasn't necessarily coupled with a plan to end it. On the other hand, I thought I'd just about done everything I could do with the character.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2001 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, TIMES RESTAURANT CRITIC
Last week, when an old friend heard I would be up northfor a few days,she called to ask if I would like to come to the Parsi New Year's dinner Niloufer was cooking at Chez Panisse. She went last year, she told me, and it was truly wonderful, each dish a marvel. Niloufer is Niloufer Ichapouria King, an anthropologist and food scholar who moved to this country from Bombay in the '60s.
FOOD
December 22, 1985 | ROSE DOSTI
The parade of mouthwatering desserts in Shere's book were created by Shere over the last 13 years while she was the pastry chef at Chez Panisse in Berkeley. Shere conceived the book, but Alice Waters, friend and owner of Chez Panisse, forced her to write it. Lucky thing too. The recipes are typical of the Alice Waters genre--healthy, simple, yet with just the right offbeat touch to set them apart from the ordinary.
NEWS
August 22, 1996 | LAURIE OCHOA, TIMES FOOD EDITOR
Writer Orville Schell once called Berkeley's Chez Panisse the epicenter of a cultural and gastronomic earthquake. Driven by the force of its founder, Alice Waters, the restaurant set off rumblings that have led to, among other things, gourmet pizza, grilled everything, a taste for hard-crusted rustic bread, the explosion of farmers markets and the appearance of salad-in-a-bag at your favorite supermarket.
FOOD
March 4, 1993 | KAREN STABINER
Fanny has had an unusual upbringing. The 9-year-old daughter of Alice Waters, California chef extraordinaire , remembers spending time inside a huge empty stockpot on the stove at her mother's restaurant. "They were just like little playpens for me," she says. Years later, when a couple's crying infant threatened to ruin their dinner at Chez Panisse, Fanny's mom offered to watch the baby.
BOOKS
April 22, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a staff writer for The Times.
IRREPRESSIBLE. Alice Waters was 27 when she decided that what she wanted most was a place where she and her friends could gather around a few tables, eat good food, drink a little (or a lot of) wine, inspire one another, fall in love, talk and thereby divert the world from its terrible path toward destruction, hatred, war, commercialization and alienation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1985
Now wait a second! Wolfgang Puck ("The Spagoization of Manhattan," by Ruth Reichl, Dec. 8) "invented the term California Cuisine?" Somebody better check with Alice Waters of Chez Panisse. I think she taught lucky Puck everything he knows. ROOS REED Van Nuys Check yourself. There's an interview with her on Page 5.
NEWS
May 31, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
Bernhard Mairinger, the young (under 30) chef/owner of BierBeisl in Beverly Hills, is so tall - 6 foot 7 inches to be exact, he looks like a giant working in the tiny open kitchen. And everybody else looks like a shrimp. He doesn't want to be tall alone, so every June, he offers a free meal at his modern Austrian bistro for anyone who measures taller than the chef.  Of course he doesn't just take you at your word. You have to be measured (without shoes) in the restaurant.  Just so you know, if you have to duck under the doorway to enter, you're probably home free.
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Bay Area television stations reported that a fire broke out just after 3 a.m. on Friday morning at Chez Panisse, damaging the facade of the famed Berkeley restaurant, founded in 1971 by pioneers of the local food movement including chef Alice Waters. Waters, speaking from her home in Berkeley, told the New York Times that no one was injured and an investigation by fire officials was underway. Waters said that the fire, which started under the porch, burned away the facade of the restaurant.
OPINION
January 21, 2012 | Patt Morrison
Little bistro, huge impact. Like a different sort of miracle of the five loaves and two fishes, Chez Panisse, the landmark Berkeley restaurant, and its founder and guiding spirit, Alice Waters, have leveraged a small temple of slow, local and organic food into a massive force in the culinary world. Now that appetite for a new/old food culture has begun to register on the public's consciousness, if not always on its plate. Waters is clearing her table of most everything but the Edible Schoolyard Project : If we are what we eat, she wants children in class, on the playground and in the cafeteria kitchen to change their identities by the forkful.
WORLD
November 22, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Here is a nightmare assignment for a restaurateur: Cook for 250 people using all-organic ingredients procured locally in a country infamous for its tainted food supply. Create a romantic setting in a latter-day fortress, the fluorescent-lighted U.S. Embassy. Alice Waters' celebrated Berkeley restaurant, Chez Panisse, was transported to Beijing last week as part of a four-day U.S.-China Forum on the Arts and Culture. Berkeley and Beijing don't have much in common except as food writer Michael Pollan, another delegate, sarcastically put it, "both are socialist paradises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2010 | By Scott Kraft
Upstairs in the packed cafe of Chez Panisse, Alice Waters is ensconced in a wood-paneled booth, looking at a kumquat souffle. She studies it solemnly, a judge appraising a defendant. "Is it really as high as it should be?" she asks. "And why is it on such a big plate?" She pauses. "I wonder whether it needs a sauce. Is it brown enough? And why are these leaves under here?" Frowning, she takes one in her hand. "Are they kumquat leaves?" (They aren't.) Jean-Pierre Moullé, the head chef, heard about it the next day. "She wasn't happy," he said, sighing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hideo Chino, 65, a San Diego County Superior Court commissioner whose family owns and operates the world-renowned Chino Ranch vegetable farm stand in northern San Diego County, died Saturday at his San Diego home after battling pancreatic cancer, his friend and former business partner Dwight Worden said. Chino, who specialized in juvenile law, had served as a court referee and then a court commissioner since 1986 until retiring this year. Before his appointment to the bench, he was in private practice and worked for a few years as assistant city attorney in Del Mar. The seventh of nine children of Japanese immigrant farmers, Chino was born March 28, 1943, at Poston No. 3, an internment camp near Parker, Ariz.
NEWS
December 6, 2001 | RUSS PARSONS, TIMES FOOD EDITOR
It won't go down with anything that has happened at Camp David, but Saturday night's truce declaration between Alice Waters and Jeremiah Tower is certainly worth a mention. Waters, owner and guiding spirit at Berkeley's Chez Panisse restaurant for 30 years, was being honored with the 2001 Robert Mondavi Wine & Food Award at a fund-raising dinner for the Collins School of Hospitality Management at Cal Poly Pomona.
FOOD
September 15, 1999 | RUSS PARSONS
Even if you think you've had enough of restaurant cookbooks, even if the words "chef's recipe" send you fleeing from the kitchen in panic, remember that there's always the exception that proves the rule. In this case, it's the "Chez Panisse Cafe Cookbook" (HarperCollins, $34). This is the best Chez Panisse cookbook since Lindsey Shere's 1985 "Chez Panisse Desserts" (available only in paper; Random House, $18).
BOOKS
April 22, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Susan Salter Reynolds is a staff writer for The Times.
IRREPRESSIBLE. Alice Waters was 27 when she decided that what she wanted most was a place where she and her friends could gather around a few tables, eat good food, drink a little (or a lot of) wine, inspire one another, fall in love, talk and thereby divert the world from its terrible path toward destruction, hatred, war, commercialization and alienation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2003 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Helen Gustafson, an expert on tea who wrote several books on the subject and who developed a tea service for Chez Panisse that became a signature for the trend-setting Berkeley restaurant, has died. She was 74. Gustafson died at home in Berkeley on Dec. 14 after a six- year battle with cancer, according to her husband, Clair. A champion of fine teas properly prepared, Gustafson taught and wrote about her subject with passion. During nearly 20 years at Chez Panisse, she attended to a selection of organically grown teas and set meticulous guidelines on how to prepare a brew, which she expected the staff to follow.
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