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Chiapas Mexico Revolts

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1995 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is a priest exiled from his parish, a man abruptly separated from almost two decades of fulfilling work, arrested at a police roadblock, forced into a truck in the rain and sent packing, without time to gather possessions, brief successors or bid farewells. The exile has caused a deep hurt for Father Loren L. Riebe, a Los Angeles native, the gnawing sense that he may never be allowed to return home.
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NEWS
March 25, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Subcommander Marcos, in an interview published Saturday, said the Zapatistas are ready to give up their military character in favor of the political process. "The movement has no future if its future is military," Marcos told Nobel Prize-winning author Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Colombian editor Roberto Pombo of Cambio magazine. "If the [Zapatista National Liberation Army] remains as an armed military structure, it will fail.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1999
Supporters of Zapatista rebels delivered 15,554 symbolic ballots to the Mexican Consulate on Wednesday as part of a worldwide referendum in support of the uprising in the state of Chiapas. The balloting took place on all continents, organizers said. The referendum addressed the Mexican political system, military, and the rights of 10 million indigenous Mexicans. "The people here in the U.S.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | Associated Press
Gov. Pablo Salazar announced Thursday that he would free all Zapatista supporters from jails in Chiapas, partially meeting one of three remaining demands made by rebels in the southern Mexican state.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Mexican army abandoned another jungle base in the southern state of Chiapas, as the government moved closer to meeting the demands of leftist Zapatista rebels. President Vicente Fox has now shuttered four of the seven Chiapas bases whose closure the rebels have demanded. The rebels accuse the army of abusing Indians and supporting paramilitary gangs. They also demand passage of an Indian rights law and the release of about 100 imprisoned rebels as a condition for restarting peace talks.
NEWS
December 23, 2000 | From Associated Press
The new administration in Mexico closed a controversial jungle army base in a unilateral gesture of goodwill toward Zapatista rebels, whose supporters had protested daily outside the facility for more than a year. The base--the first to be closed in Chiapas state--was handed over to villagers Friday, the third anniversary of the 1997 Acteal massacre, as part of President Vicente Fox's strategy of wooing the leftist rebels back to peace talks stalled since 1996.
NEWS
August 1, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A trip by two American Embassy employees to violence-racked Chiapas state this week has produced a political uproar, reflecting Mexico's persistent suspicions of its powerful neighbor. The diplomats, from the U.S. defense attache's staff, were in Chiapas on a routine fact-finding trip, said the U.S. Embassy. Their low-key trip blew up into a national issue after the pair were detained Sunday by suspicious villagers of the hamlet of Los Platanos.
NEWS
December 16, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bid to maintain the shaky peace in Mexico's southernmost state, President Ernesto Zedillo launched a peace offensive that he hopes will persuade armed rebels in Chiapas to halt plans to restart their guerrilla war against the government.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | Associated Press
Gov. Pablo Salazar announced Thursday that he would free all Zapatista supporters from jails in Chiapas, partially meeting one of three remaining demands made by rebels in the southern Mexican state.
NEWS
December 2, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Within hours of President Vicente Fox's inauguration Friday, Mexican troops began pulling back from jungle and mountain conflict zones in Chiapas state, government officials said, in a confidence-building measure that could improve prospects for peace. In his inaugural address, Fox reached out to the Zapatista rebels of Chiapas, saying he will submit a peace plan to Congress as his first legislative act. He added that actions speak louder than words in ending the Chiapas conflict.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Mexican army abandoned another jungle base in the southern state of Chiapas, as the government moved closer to meeting the demands of leftist Zapatista rebels. President Vicente Fox has now shuttered four of the seven Chiapas bases whose closure the rebels have demanded. The rebels accuse the army of abusing Indians and supporting paramilitary gangs. They also demand passage of an Indian rights law and the release of about 100 imprisoned rebels as a condition for restarting peace talks.
NEWS
January 2, 2001 | From Associated Press
Zapatista rebels marked the seventh anniversary of their 1994 Indian rights rebellion with praise for Mexican President Vicente Fox's efforts to restart peace talks--and a warning that his actions don't go far enough. A day after the government announced that it was closing a second military base in a conflict zone of the troubled southern state of Chiapas, the Zapatistas said they would settle for nothing less than the closure of all seven bases located near rebel strongholds.
NEWS
December 23, 2000 | From Associated Press
The new administration in Mexico closed a controversial jungle army base in a unilateral gesture of goodwill toward Zapatista rebels, whose supporters had protested daily outside the facility for more than a year. The base--the first to be closed in Chiapas state--was handed over to villagers Friday, the third anniversary of the 1997 Acteal massacre, as part of President Vicente Fox's strategy of wooing the leftist rebels back to peace talks stalled since 1996.
NEWS
December 2, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Within hours of President Vicente Fox's inauguration Friday, Mexican troops began pulling back from jungle and mountain conflict zones in Chiapas state, government officials said, in a confidence-building measure that could improve prospects for peace. In his inaugural address, Fox reached out to the Zapatista rebels of Chiapas, saying he will submit a peace plan to Congress as his first legislative act. He added that actions speak louder than words in ending the Chiapas conflict.
NEWS
January 7, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To cries of dismay Thursday from human rights activists, the government has brought deportation proceedings against 43 foreigners, including 34 Americans, who joined New Year's celebrations to mark the sixth anniversary of the Zapatista rebellion in Chiapas. Immigration officials said 12 of the foreigners have been told to leave the country. Hearings are still pending in the remaining 31 cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1999
Supporters of Zapatista rebels delivered 15,554 symbolic ballots to the Mexican Consulate on Wednesday as part of a worldwide referendum in support of the uprising in the state of Chiapas. The balloting took place on all continents, organizers said. The referendum addressed the Mexican political system, military, and the rights of 10 million indigenous Mexicans. "The people here in the U.S.
NEWS
March 25, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Subcommander Marcos, in an interview published Saturday, said the Zapatistas are ready to give up their military character in favor of the political process. "The movement has no future if its future is military," Marcos told Nobel Prize-winning author Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Colombian editor Roberto Pombo of Cambio magazine. "If the [Zapatista National Liberation Army] remains as an armed military structure, it will fail.
NEWS
January 7, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To cries of dismay Thursday from human rights activists, the government has brought deportation proceedings against 43 foreigners, including 34 Americans, who joined New Year's celebrations to mark the sixth anniversary of the Zapatista rebellion in Chiapas. Immigration officials said 12 of the foreigners have been told to leave the country. Hearings are still pending in the remaining 31 cases.
NEWS
August 1, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A trip by two American Embassy employees to violence-racked Chiapas state this week has produced a political uproar, reflecting Mexico's persistent suspicions of its powerful neighbor. The diplomats, from the U.S. defense attache's staff, were in Chiapas on a routine fact-finding trip, said the U.S. Embassy. Their low-key trip blew up into a national issue after the pair were detained Sunday by suspicious villagers of the hamlet of Los Platanos.
NEWS
July 26, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego teacher Peter Brown, who organized "tourists of conscience" to build a middle school in a pro-Zapatista village in Chiapas state, was deported from Mexico on Saturday for allegedly interfering in the nation's internal affairs. Brown's son, Erin Eldred-Brown, said by telephone from San Diego that his father was flown from Mexico City to Houston on Saturday afternoon and was expected home late Saturday night. He had been arrested late Friday.
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