Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsChiat Day Company
IN THE NEWS

Chiat Day Company

BUSINESS
April 13, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Derrell Angelo knew that she absolutely, positively had to find a better way to make a living than by listening to earfuls of customer complaints at Federal Express. No doubt a master's degree in negotiations management qualified her for the job. But her undergraduate degree was in advertising--and that's what the African-American resident of Lawndale always wanted to do. Yet at 27, she had all but given up hope of an ad career.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
February 18, 1999 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a commercial world where frogs croak for a brewery and a bunny drums up business for a battery company, it's probably no surprise that a Chihuahua would end up barking about tacos for Taco Bell Corp. But not even advertising industry executives who created the quirky ad campaign guessed how popular the "Yo quiero Taco Bell" (I want Taco Bell) ads would become.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
They are watching how we drink our beer--and even how we wriggle into our blue jeans. And then, they are selling these rituals back to us--in ads. They are the research directors at some of the nation's most successful advertising agencies. And two highly successful ad firms have recently put together ad campaigns that use common rituals to try to sell us their clients' products.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is the "Ad Agency of the Decade" flinching? Is it in trouble? Or is it just being its ornery self? Chiat/Day, the Venice ad firm Advertising Age called the "Agency of the Decade" three years ago, ran national newspaper ads Monday that tried to put the best light on some very bad news: It was fired last week by client Reebok for the second time in five years. The headline to its unusual newspaper ad said, "Now we know how Dan felt."
BUSINESS
November 9, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When baseball players have hitting slumps they take batting practice. When car makers suffer sales slumps they lower prices. But what happens when an advertising agency has a creative slump? Well, at the Venice ad agency Chiat/Day/Mojo, they went back to the drawing boards. There, they came up with a funny bunny that won't sit still--and a car that makes sonic booms. That might not sound like much.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Howard J. Rubenstein, one of New York's top public relations executives, had scheduled a private dinner for some of his key clients on the night war broke out in the Persian Gulf. It was too late to cancel when Rubenstein got word of the U.S.-led bombing raid, but his guests were not much interested in food or talking business. They spent the evening huddled around a TV set that Rubenstein had lugged into the dining room. "Nobody spent two seconds talking about business," he said.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Steve Beaumont figures that his vacation lasted five hours. And he was lucky to get that much. It was early last August, the day after Chiat/Day, the Los Angeles ad agency, landed one of the biggest advertising accounts on the West Coast, the $150-million Nissan business. Beaumont, then senior art director, had planned to take a week off and move into a new house. But on his first day in the new home--even before lunchtime--the phone rang.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|