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Chicago Hope

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1994 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
The new CBS drama series from David E. Kelley ("Picket Fences") is familiar television dipped in high gloss: A bureaucratic but medically sound hospital environment that hemorrhages hope, not heartbreak. Headstrong but gifted doctors. A no-nonsense but caring chief of staff who goes to the mat for his guys. The whole, formulaic works. "Chicago Hope" gets by from time to time on the magnetism of its lead characters: dashing Dr.
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SPORTS
June 7, 2013 | By David Wharton
CHICAGO -- The Chicago Blackhawks broke out a familiar cliche when they arrived back home  Friday. Leading the Kings three games to one in the Western Conference finals, they promised to play Game 5 on Saturday as if they were behind. "You know the other team's going to come at you hard," captain Jonathan Toews said. "But it's up to you to motivate yourself. " Nothing new there. Toews did talk some strategy, however, saying his team has a formula for playing hard. "We keep saying in the locker room that we need all four lines and no one has to go out there and try to do too much," he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another barrier related to the so-called "Seven Dirty Words You Can't Say on TV" will fall in Thursday's episode of "Chicago Hope," when a character says the phrase, "S--- happens." Broadcasters have gradually relaxed their standards regarding language, from "NYPD Blue" to Fox's new Hollywood satire "Action," which uses potentially offensive words and bleeps them out, as cable network Comedy Central does on "South Park."
NATIONAL
September 13, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Negotiators returned to the bargaining table, hoping that Thursday, the fourth day of the teachers strike in Chicago, will be the last. Talks ended just before midnight with both sides agreeing that significant progress had been made in the strike at the nation's third-largest school district. Thousands of unionized teachers have shut down the district, leaving parents scrambling to find care for the 350,000 students who are shut out of classes. “We feel like we're in a pretty good place, we've made a lot of progress today,” teachers union president Karen Lewis told reporters.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1994 | LEE MARGULIES
CBS' "Chicago Hope" got crushed by NBC's "ER" in the Thursday-night battle of medical dramas this fall, but it turns out that it was nothing personal. Millions of viewers were only too happy to take a look when CBS put the series on at a more convenient hour last Sunday--namely, into the slot normally occupied by "Murder, She Wrote." Ratings released Tuesday by the A.C. Nielsen Co. showed that "Chicago Hope," co-starring Adam Arkin, ranked No.
NEWS
May 7, 1995 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adam Arkin has done his share of comedy and drama since making making his feature film debut in the 1971 comedy "Made for Each Other" at the ripe old age of 14. Though until now he was most familiar to TV audiences for his delightful portrayal of the feral gourmet chef Adam on CBS' "Northern Exposure," he's exercised his dramatic chops this season as the restrained and methodical Dr. Aaron Shutt on CBS' "Chicago Hope."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting on her sprawling back lawn because the house she just moved into is suffused with the smell of fresh paint, actress Christine Lahti is the picture of contentment. Her large black lab is snoozing nearby, the 2-year-old twins are asleep upstairs, a gurgling pond forms a backdrop to conversation, and soon a car will come to whisk her to the set of CBS' "Chicago Hope," where she plays Dr. Kathryn Austin, the dynamic new heart surgeon and vital addition to a changing cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1999 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Chicago Hope" and "ER" are in a space jam. Producers of CBS' "Chicago Hope," who have been steadily building a story line that will put former chief of surgery Kate Austin (Christine Lahti) into space as a shuttle payload specialist by the end of the season, are seeing stars over a similar plot line that has suddenly popped up on NBC's "ER."
NEWS
April 3, 1995 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An AIDS patient with six months to live is deliberately infected with life-threatening malaria by an enthusiastic hospital researcher. A devoted wife becomes pregnant so the brain cells of her fetus can be "harvested" in the operating room to treat her husband's Parkinson's disease. With inflammatory story lines like these, some viewers of "Chicago Hope" are wondering if the Monday night doctor drama is giving false hope to real people with incurable diseases.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two medical dramas set in the same town. Two prominent creators. One time period. One winner. The outcome: One show gets a clean bill of health. The other is disabled. That's how many television writers summed up the highly publicized showdown last September between NBC's "ER" and CBS' "Chicago Hope." To "ER," the victor of the Thursday at 10 p.m. conflict, went the spoils: huge ratings, tons of publicity and accolades to creator Michael Crichton.
SPORTS
October 9, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
In a setting that has all the makings of a frenzy, the Detroit Lions draw a Monday night home game against the NFC North division rival Chicago Bears while trying to extend their unbeaten start to 5-0. The once-floundering organization that failed to win a game three seasons ago and has one playoff victory since 1957 will send its vaunted pass rush against Bears quarterback Jay Cutler, whose increasingly shaky outings bear the scars of a leaky offensive...
BUSINESS
December 21, 2007 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
For more than 40 years, Martha Campbell has started her day by picking up a copy of the Chicago Tribune. As a youngster, she scoured the pages to make sure the country hadn't gone to war with the Soviet Union. As a parent, she got up hours before her three children woke to study the opinion pages and read the feature stories. Now, as a retiree, she turns to the crossword puzzle -- and also sadly tracks the stories about her beloved hometown paper's fading fortunes.
SPORTS
October 13, 2005 | Tim Brown, Times Staff Writer
The ball's not the only thing that might have changed direction. While the Angels were assured only of taking a 1-1 tie into extra innings Wednesday night, many of the Chicago White Sox took plate umpire Doug Eddings' ninth-inning call as the arrival of good fortune, aiding their effort to win, 2-1, and tie the American League championship series after two games. "It was definitely a break," White Sox center fielder Aaron Rowand said. "I don't know if the ball bounced or not, but we'll take it.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2000 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CBS may be introducing a reality series titled "Survivor" later this month, but the survival rate on new TV programs continues to make them look like an endangered species. Only one in three series introduced last fall by the six broadcast networks will return for a second season, as the two broadcast networks owned by Viacom, CBS and UPN, put the finishing touches on their prime-time lineups, bringing the process of revising TV schedules for next season near its close.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CBS' medical drama "Chicago Hope" gets an infusion of new blood Thursday when Emmy Award-winner James Garner checks in for a four-episode stint. The veteran actor plays Hugh Miller, the ruthless head of an HMO who causes havoc among the doctors when he decides to slash the budget after his company buys the hospital. "They don't know if I'm a good guy or a bad guy," says Garner, who starred in the classic TV series "Maverick" and "The Rockford Files." "I don't know myself yet," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1999
Citing the reasons as "creative vision" and to be more realistic, CBS is allowing "Chicago Hope" to use a four-letter, scatological word in their drama ("CBS Allows Four-Letter Word on 'Chicago Hope,' " Oct. 13). I think it would be more "creative" and "realistic" if they just threw the show down the toilet. I can't watch it anyway because I don't have a TV in my bathroom. GEORGE WOOD Malibu
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CBS' medical drama "Chicago Hope" gets an infusion of new blood Thursday when Emmy Award-winner James Garner checks in for a four-episode stint. The veteran actor plays Hugh Miller, the ruthless head of an HMO who causes havoc among the doctors when he decides to slash the budget after his company buys the hospital. "They don't know if I'm a good guy or a bad guy," says Garner, who starred in the classic TV series "Maverick" and "The Rockford Files." "I don't know myself yet," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since receiving a Golden Globe and an Oscar nomination last year for "The Mirror Has Two Faces," Lauren Bacall confesses she hasn't "had a decent offer of a movie." "They are not writing wonderful parts for women," Bacall says with a husky sigh. "That is the sad truth. They were certainly not breaking down the doors for me, anyway." So Bacall is checking into CBS' "Chicago Hope" tonight for a two-episode guest stint.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another barrier related to the so-called "Seven Dirty Words You Can't Say on TV" will fall in Thursday's episode of "Chicago Hope," when a character says the phrase, "S--- happens." Broadcasters have gradually relaxed their standards regarding language, from "NYPD Blue" to Fox's new Hollywood satire "Action," which uses potentially offensive words and bleeps them out, as cable network Comedy Central does on "South Park."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1999 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Morton Doran says he didn't discover he had the neurological disorder Tourette's syndrome until he was 37; by then, Doran, a general surgeon practicing in northwest Canada, was living a double life. At home, with his wife and children, he displayed the symptoms of full-blown Tourette's--motor tics, obsessive-compulsive rituals and uncontrolled, expletive-laden outbursts known as coprolalia.
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