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Chicago Hope Television Program

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1999 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Morton Doran says he didn't discover he had the neurological disorder Tourette's syndrome until he was 37; by then, Doran, a general surgeon practicing in northwest Canada, was living a double life. At home, with his wife and children, he displayed the symptoms of full-blown Tourette's--motor tics, obsessive-compulsive rituals and uncontrolled, expletive-laden outbursts known as coprolalia.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CBS' medical drama "Chicago Hope" gets an infusion of new blood Thursday when Emmy Award-winner James Garner checks in for a four-episode stint. The veteran actor plays Hugh Miller, the ruthless head of an HMO who causes havoc among the doctors when he decides to slash the budget after his company buys the hospital. "They don't know if I'm a good guy or a bad guy," says Garner, who starred in the classic TV series "Maverick" and "The Rockford Files." "I don't know myself yet," he says.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1999 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Chicago Hope" and "ER" are in a space jam. Producers of CBS' "Chicago Hope," who have been steadily building a story line that will put former chief of surgery Kate Austin (Christine Lahti) into space as a shuttle payload specialist by the end of the season, are seeing stars over a similar plot line that has suddenly popped up on NBC's "ER."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1999 | PAUL BROWNFIELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Morton Doran says he didn't discover he had the neurological disorder Tourette's syndrome until he was 37; by then, Doran, a general surgeon practicing in northwest Canada, was living a double life. At home, with his wife and children, he displayed the symptoms of full-blown Tourette's--motor tics, obsessive-compulsive rituals and uncontrolled, expletive-laden outbursts known as coprolalia.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1996 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Actors and producers of hit shows suffer no shortage of acclaim and fame. They're interviewed and reported on endlessly. They win awards. They're lavished with credit and praise for luring big audiences each week. But all of these people--and much of their success or failure--are at the mercy of people who the average TV viewer has barely heard of: network programming executives. The keepers of the time slot. Case in point: CBS' "Chicago Hope."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 3 1/2 years of occupying the coveted Monday 10 p.m. slot on CBS, the acclaimed series "Northern Exposure" is about to get exposed on a new night. Starting Jan. 4, "Northern Exposure" is moving to Wednesdays at 10 p.m., while "Chicago Hope," a first-year medical drama that airs Thursdays at 9 p.m., will take up residency in the 10 p.m. Monday time slot on Jan. 2.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1995 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The statuesque woman helps lift and carry her frail father from his wheelchair to the hospital room's vinyl armchair. As the woman, now behind her father, gently places her hands on his slender shoulders, her eyes swell with tears and his discomfort is obvious. It's the set of the CBS hospital drama "Chicago Hope"--but they're not acting. Not yet, anyway. Richard and Rain Pryor, father and daughter, anxiously wait for rehearsal to begin for their first performance together.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since receiving a Golden Globe and an Oscar nomination last year for "The Mirror Has Two Faces," Lauren Bacall confesses she hasn't "had a decent offer of a movie." "They are not writing wonderful parts for women," Bacall says with a husky sigh. "That is the sad truth. They were certainly not breaking down the doors for me, anyway." So Bacall is checking into CBS' "Chicago Hope" tonight for a two-episode guest stint.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two medical dramas set in the same town. Two prominent creators. One time period. One winner. The outcome: One show gets a clean bill of health. The other is disabled. That's how many television writers summed up the highly publicized showdown last September between NBC's "ER" and CBS' "Chicago Hope." To "ER," the victor of the Thursday at 10 p.m. conflict, went the spoils: huge ratings, tons of publicity and accolades to creator Michael Crichton.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting on her sprawling back lawn because the house she just moved into is suffused with the smell of fresh paint, actress Christine Lahti is the picture of contentment. Her large black lab is snoozing nearby, the 2-year-old twins are asleep upstairs, a gurgling pond forms a backdrop to conversation, and soon a car will come to whisk her to the set of CBS' "Chicago Hope," where she plays Dr. Kathryn Austin, the dynamic new heart surgeon and vital addition to a changing cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1999 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Chicago Hope" and "ER" are in a space jam. Producers of CBS' "Chicago Hope," who have been steadily building a story line that will put former chief of surgery Kate Austin (Christine Lahti) into space as a shuttle payload specialist by the end of the season, are seeing stars over a similar plot line that has suddenly popped up on NBC's "ER."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since receiving a Golden Globe and an Oscar nomination last year for "The Mirror Has Two Faces," Lauren Bacall confesses she hasn't "had a decent offer of a movie." "They are not writing wonderful parts for women," Bacall says with a husky sigh. "That is the sad truth. They were certainly not breaking down the doors for me, anyway." So Bacall is checking into CBS' "Chicago Hope" tonight for a two-episode guest stint.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1996 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Actors and producers of hit shows suffer no shortage of acclaim and fame. They're interviewed and reported on endlessly. They win awards. They're lavished with credit and praise for luring big audiences each week. But all of these people--and much of their success or failure--are at the mercy of people who the average TV viewer has barely heard of: network programming executives. The keepers of the time slot. Case in point: CBS' "Chicago Hope."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1995 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The statuesque woman helps lift and carry her frail father from his wheelchair to the hospital room's vinyl armchair. As the woman, now behind her father, gently places her hands on his slender shoulders, her eyes swell with tears and his discomfort is obvious. It's the set of the CBS hospital drama "Chicago Hope"--but they're not acting. Not yet, anyway. Richard and Rain Pryor, father and daughter, anxiously wait for rehearsal to begin for their first performance together.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting on her sprawling back lawn because the house she just moved into is suffused with the smell of fresh paint, actress Christine Lahti is the picture of contentment. Her large black lab is snoozing nearby, the 2-year-old twins are asleep upstairs, a gurgling pond forms a backdrop to conversation, and soon a car will come to whisk her to the set of CBS' "Chicago Hope," where she plays Dr. Kathryn Austin, the dynamic new heart surgeon and vital addition to a changing cast.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two medical dramas set in the same town. Two prominent creators. One time period. One winner. The outcome: One show gets a clean bill of health. The other is disabled. That's how many television writers summed up the highly publicized showdown last September between NBC's "ER" and CBS' "Chicago Hope." To "ER," the victor of the Thursday at 10 p.m. conflict, went the spoils: huge ratings, tons of publicity and accolades to creator Michael Crichton.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CBS' medical drama "Chicago Hope" gets an infusion of new blood Thursday when Emmy Award-winner James Garner checks in for a four-episode stint. The veteran actor plays Hugh Miller, the ruthless head of an HMO who causes havoc among the doctors when he decides to slash the budget after his company buys the hospital. "They don't know if I'm a good guy or a bad guy," says Garner, who starred in the classic TV series "Maverick" and "The Rockford Files." "I don't know myself yet," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1994 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 3 1/2 years of occupying the coveted Monday 10 p.m. slot on CBS, the acclaimed series "Northern Exposure" is about to get exposed on a new night. Starting Jan. 4, "Northern Exposure" is moving to Wednesdays at 10 p.m., while "Chicago Hope," a first-year medical drama that airs Thursdays at 9 p.m., will take up residency in the 10 p.m. Monday time slot on Jan. 2.
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