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NEWS
June 1, 1995 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal housing officials Wednesday took control of Chicago's troubled public housing system, a move that signals the deepening chaos afflicting big city housing projects and tarnishes the vision of Vincent Lane, the activist city housing administrator whose dreams of transforming high-rise slums are now clouded by his resignation.
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NATIONAL
March 1, 2005 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
For 24 years, Gladys Franklin has called the Cabrini-Green projects home. The high-rise where she lives is decaying, and nearly a third of the doors and windows are boarded up. Squatters have broken into some of the apartments. Other units sit empty. The elevator works only when it wants to, so Franklin refuses to take it. Instead, she hobbles to the stairwell that reeks of urine. Stepping over a broken crack pipe, she inches down the 14 steps from her second-floor home.
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NEWS
May 29, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Chicago will get another chance to prove it can run its public housing program, which was seized by the federal government four years ago because of mismanagement. City officials said it will take several months to complete the transition and fine-tune plans to run the Chicago Housing Authority, which was turned over to the city by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The federal agency seized CHA in 1995 after a series of scandals.
NEWS
August 16, 2000 | From Reuters
The infamous Cabrini-Green public housing project, long viewed as a gang-ridden pocket of poverty and mayhem, will be remade under an agreement signed Tuesday, housing officials said. As part of a 10-year plan to downsize and transform the city's moribund public housing projects for its 130,000 residents with $1.5 billion in federal funds, the Chicago Housing Authority reached agreement with tenant groups to transform the decades-old Cabrini-Green complex.
NATIONAL
March 1, 2005 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
For 24 years, Gladys Franklin has called the Cabrini-Green projects home. The high-rise where she lives is decaying, and nearly a third of the doors and windows are boarded up. Squatters have broken into some of the apartments. Other units sit empty. The elevator works only when it wants to, so Franklin refuses to take it. Instead, she hobbles to the stairwell that reeks of urine. Stepping over a broken crack pipe, she inches down the 14 steps from her second-floor home.
NEWS
August 16, 2000 | From Reuters
The infamous Cabrini-Green public housing project, long viewed as a gang-ridden pocket of poverty and mayhem, will be remade under an agreement signed Tuesday, housing officials said. As part of a 10-year plan to downsize and transform the city's moribund public housing projects for its 130,000 residents with $1.5 billion in federal funds, the Chicago Housing Authority reached agreement with tenant groups to transform the decades-old Cabrini-Green complex.
NEWS
February 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The city of Chicago and the federal government reached an agreement for a $1.5-billion overhaul of the Chicago Housing Authority--including the demolition of 51 high-rises that became a national emblem of urban decay and poverty. The project, to be completed over a 10-year period, will demolish some of the most notorious public housing buildings. In all, 25,000 apartments will either be replaced or renovated.
NEWS
September 16, 1987
The Chicago Housing Authority avoided a threatened federal takeover with an agreement to limited intervention by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The proposed pact, subject to approval by HUD Secretary Samuel R. Pierce Jr., would leave day-to-day control in the hands of the Chicago agency. It also calls for appointment of a federal liaison officer to ensure enforcement of HUD regulations, and creation of a panel to resolve disputes between the local and federal agencies.
NEWS
December 13, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Public housing officials say the demolition of four buildings along Chicago's waterfront skyline represents the beginning of the end of the high-rise era--a chapter that many Chicagoans are more than happy to close. Officially, the four Chicago Housing Authority buildings were known as Lakefront Properties. To many, they were simply "the projects," a term that encompassed any number of Chicago's public housing high-rises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991
I must admit that I was rather surprised by your "Gunning Down Real Progress" editorial (June 16). In this editorial you not only endorse the Chicago Housing Authority's rules forbidding possession of firearms by public housing residents, but call for its extension to Los Angeles, and term opposition "bizarre" and "depraved." Are you really sure that you want to support the idea of limiting the civil rights of people solely on the grounds that they occupy public housing? Why don't we follow your reasoning a little further.
NEWS
February 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The city of Chicago and the federal government reached an agreement for a $1.5-billion overhaul of the Chicago Housing Authority--including the demolition of 51 high-rises that became a national emblem of urban decay and poverty. The project, to be completed over a 10-year period, will demolish some of the most notorious public housing buildings. In all, 25,000 apartments will either be replaced or renovated.
NEWS
May 29, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Chicago will get another chance to prove it can run its public housing program, which was seized by the federal government four years ago because of mismanagement. City officials said it will take several months to complete the transition and fine-tune plans to run the Chicago Housing Authority, which was turned over to the city by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The federal agency seized CHA in 1995 after a series of scandals.
NEWS
December 13, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Public housing officials say the demolition of four buildings along Chicago's waterfront skyline represents the beginning of the end of the high-rise era--a chapter that many Chicagoans are more than happy to close. Officially, the four Chicago Housing Authority buildings were known as Lakefront Properties. To many, they were simply "the projects," a term that encompassed any number of Chicago's public housing high-rises.
NEWS
June 1, 1995 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal housing officials Wednesday took control of Chicago's troubled public housing system, a move that signals the deepening chaos afflicting big city housing projects and tarnishes the vision of Vincent Lane, the activist city housing administrator whose dreams of transforming high-rise slums are now clouded by his resignation.
NEWS
June 18, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton traveled to one of the nation's most violent housing projects Friday as he sought to generate support for the Administration's anti-crime bill, still mired in Congress months after the President had hoped to sign it into law. Standing in front of a display of automatic weapons seized during controversial sweeps of buildings at the Robert Taylor Homes on Chicago's south side, Clinton said that "the Congress cannot walk away from this."
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cabrini-Green projects tower over the northern edge of downtown like a high-rise graveyard, a monument to the futility of three decades of public housing policy and the hopelessness of all who live there. Vincent Lane, the man who runs these skyline eyesores of mottled cinder-block and security fencing, comes here often on a mission that many Cabrini tenants regard as a fool's errand.
NEWS
June 18, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton traveled to one of the nation's most violent housing projects Friday as he sought to generate support for the Administration's anti-crime bill, still mired in Congress months after the President had hoped to sign it into law. Standing in front of a display of automatic weapons seized during controversial sweeps of buildings at the Robert Taylor Homes on Chicago's south side, Clinton said that "the Congress cannot walk away from this."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991
I must admit that I was rather surprised by your "Gunning Down Real Progress" editorial (June 16). In this editorial you not only endorse the Chicago Housing Authority's rules forbidding possession of firearms by public housing residents, but call for its extension to Los Angeles, and term opposition "bizarre" and "depraved." Are you really sure that you want to support the idea of limiting the civil rights of people solely on the grounds that they occupy public housing? Why don't we follow your reasoning a little further.
NEWS
February 12, 1990 | TRACY SHRYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City and federal officials here are encouraging 160 young men from two of the city's roughest public-housing projects to steal, shoot and run into the dead of night. It's not gang-related corruption. It's anti-gang basketball. In the latest manifestation of an idea that has been keeping ghetto youths from turning to crime in Maryland for four years, the Chicago Housing Authority last week began sponsoring a basketball league that plays its games between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m.
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