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Chicano Moratorium

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1993 | DAVID A. AVILA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 60 activists and supporters met Saturday to commemorate the 23rd anniversary of the Chicano Moratorium and march in East Los Angeles in which 30,000 people took part. The event Saturday focused on current problems such as racism, community empowerment and immigration.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2011 | Hector Tobar
Ruben Salazar had been lying on the floor of the Silver Dollar Bar for nearly three hours when a pair of homicide detectives from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department finally arrived to examine his body. It was Aug. 29, 1970. Night had fallen. The bar was dark and still stank of tear gas, so Dets. Donald Cannon and Conrad Alvarez donned masks and used "battle lamp" flashlights. Among the many facts in their report — the position of Salazar's body, the location of the tear-gas canister that killed him — they noted the button pinned to his jacket: "Chicano Moratorium.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1995 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost a quarter-century has passed since Ricardo Gonzalves of Fullerton went to East Los Angeles to join 20,000 Chicanos protesting the Vietnam War and the lack of opportunities for Latinos in education, politics and business. The protest march, which Latino activists say was the largest political gathering of people of Mexican descent in U. S. history, turned violent when police clashed with activists.
OPINION
August 28, 2010
On Aug. 29, 1970, between 20,000 and 30,000 Latinos took to the streets of East L.A., marching down Whittier Boulevard for a mass rally at Laguna Park. It was an intoxicating moment, old-timers say. High school students and farmworkers, families and college kids had united for a peaceful afternoon of music and speeches. They were calling for equal opportunity and justice: respectful treatment from law enforcement, fair wages and working conditions from employers, a decent education and an end to the Vietnam War. It was a time when the nation was wrestling with civil rights issues, and Los Angeles was no different.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2002 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a young amateur photographer, Kathy Gallegos trekked 32 years ago to the Eastside of Los Angeles, where thousands were gathering for a series of anti-Vietnam War protests. Fearing one event would turn violent, she left early, missing history in the making. Now, the 53-year-old owner of Avenue 50 Studio in Highland Park is hosting an exhibit, including photos and newspaper articles, that captures much of the history she missed.
OPINION
August 28, 2010
On Aug. 29, 1970, between 20,000 and 30,000 Latinos took to the streets of East L.A., marching down Whittier Boulevard for a mass rally at Laguna Park. It was an intoxicating moment, old-timers say. High school students and farmworkers, families and college kids had united for a peaceful afternoon of music and speeches. They were calling for equal opportunity and justice: respectful treatment from law enforcement, fair wages and working conditions from employers, a decent education and an end to the Vietnam War. It was a time when the nation was wrestling with civil rights issues, and Los Angeles was no different.
NEWS
July 9, 2010
Egyptian shooting: An article in Wednesday's SectionA about an Egyptian bus driver's alleged killing of six laborers and wounding of 16 gave the name of the driver as Mahmud Tasha Swelled. His name is Mahmoud Taha Swellem. In addition, the name of the reporter who wrote the article appeared as Amor Hassan. His name is Amro Hassan. Michael Steele: Articles published in Saturday's and Sunday's Section A concerning criticism of Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele reported that a club where Republican Party funds were spent is in Hollywood.
OPINION
August 11, 2002 | FRANK del OLMO
In the 1960s, Mexican Americans were often called "the forgotten minority." That is outdated, the argument goes, because Latinos are a majority in cities from Miami to San Antonio, and soon in Los Angeles. The call now is for a new strategy based on Latinos' emerging political, economic and cultural clout. I don't disagree with that view. But there are times when the anger that marked the Chicano movimiento protests, especially against the Vietnam War, still comes in handy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2011 | Hector Tobar
Ruben Salazar had been lying on the floor of the Silver Dollar Bar for nearly three hours when a pair of homicide detectives from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department finally arrived to examine his body. It was Aug. 29, 1970. Night had fallen. The bar was dark and still stank of tear gas, so Dets. Donald Cannon and Conrad Alvarez donned masks and used "battle lamp" flashlights. Among the many facts in their report — the position of Salazar's body, the location of the tear-gas canister that killed him — they noted the button pinned to his jacket: "Chicano Moratorium.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1993
I really enjoyed Luis Torres' reminiscences about Los Lobos ("How the Wolves Survived," Aug. 29). He evoked childhood memories with his telling of Elenita Salinas coming into so many Chicano homes via la radio . I too grew up on Chocolate Ibarra and Nestle's Quik. Nonetheless, I am also writing regarding a couple of oversights. First, a reader may get the impression that the "yellow album" was the first recording venture by Los Lobos. I happen to own a 1976 LP titled "Si Se Puede," on the Pan American Records label, which includes Los Lobos del Este de Los Angeles (with Frank Gonzalez)
NEWS
July 9, 2010
Egyptian shooting: An article in Wednesday's SectionA about an Egyptian bus driver's alleged killing of six laborers and wounding of 16 gave the name of the driver as Mahmud Tasha Swelled. His name is Mahmoud Taha Swellem. In addition, the name of the reporter who wrote the article appeared as Amor Hassan. His name is Amro Hassan. Michael Steele: Articles published in Saturday's and Sunday's Section A concerning criticism of Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele reported that a club where Republican Party funds were spent is in Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2002 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a young amateur photographer, Kathy Gallegos trekked 32 years ago to the Eastside of Los Angeles, where thousands were gathering for a series of anti-Vietnam War protests. Fearing one event would turn violent, she left early, missing history in the making. Now, the 53-year-old owner of Avenue 50 Studio in Highland Park is hosting an exhibit, including photos and newspaper articles, that captures much of the history she missed.
OPINION
August 17, 2002
"There Was a Time of Chicano Protest and Heat: Let's Not Forget," Commentary, Aug. 11: I too join Frank del Olmo in applauding the Chicano Moratorium Committee, which organized a massive protest in East Los Angeles on Aug. 29, 1970, against the Vietnam War and the disproportionate number of Latinos being killed in that war. To attack and ridicule the organizers of the upcoming commemoration, as Del Olmo suggests some might do, is to be unaware of...
OPINION
August 11, 2002 | FRANK del OLMO
In the 1960s, Mexican Americans were often called "the forgotten minority." That is outdated, the argument goes, because Latinos are a majority in cities from Miami to San Antonio, and soon in Los Angeles. The call now is for a new strategy based on Latinos' emerging political, economic and cultural clout. I don't disagree with that view. But there are times when the anger that marked the Chicano movimiento protests, especially against the Vietnam War, still comes in handy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1998 | MARY HELEN PONCE, Mary Helen Ponce is a Sunland writer
It is with a sinking feeling that I read where, in an effort to recruit Latinos to the U.S. military, the Pentagon will, among other things, consider changing requirements to lower standards for aptitude tests said by Latino advocacy groups to discriminate against minorities. The inclusion of lower standards--from high school diploma to a GED (certificate of completion)--adds insult to injury.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1998 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
During the early years of the Chicano movement, in the '70s, Frank Romero established a reputation as one of its art heroes. He belonged to the first group of local contemporary Latino artists to crack the hallowed halls of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in the 1974 exhibition "Los Four." Their breakthrough was greeted with accusations that they had sold out to the establishment. Sometimes nothing fails like success. Now Cal State L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1998 | MARY HELEN PONCE, Mary Helen Ponce is a Sunland writer
It is with a sinking feeling that I read where, in an effort to recruit Latinos to the U.S. military, the Pentagon will, among other things, consider changing requirements to lower standards for aptitude tests said by Latino advocacy groups to discriminate against minorities. The inclusion of lower standards--from high school diploma to a GED (certificate of completion)--adds insult to injury.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1989 | ANTONIO H. RODRIGUEZ and GLORIA J. ROMERO, Antonio H. Rodriguez is an attorney and the executive director of the Latino Community Justice Center in Los Angeles. Gloria J. Romero is an assistant professor of psychology at Cal State Los Angeles.
Hundreds of Chicanos will gather Thursday in a "20th-Year Activist Reunion" in San Antonio, Tex., to reassess the gains of el movimiento, the Chicano movement. As we walk down Memory Lane, bidding farewell to the commercially dubbed "Decade of the Hispanic," we will ask ourselves, "As a community, are we better off now than we were 20 years ago?"
BOOKS
September 3, 1995 | Ruben Martinez, Ruben Martinez is an editor at Pacific News Service and the author of "The Other Side: Notes from the New L.A., Mexico City and Beyond" (Vintage)
On the 25th anniversary of Ruben Salazar's death, UC Santa Barbara history and Chicano studies Professor Mario T. Garcia has completed a task that should have been undertaken long ago: exhuming from the ashes of a not-too-distant history the memory of the man who became the martyr of the Chicano Moratorium anti-war protest of Aug. 29, 1970, when he was killed by an L.A. County sheriff's tear-gas canister in the midst of the pandemonium in East Los...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1995 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost a quarter-century has passed since Ricardo Gonzalves of Fullerton went to East Los Angeles to join 20,000 Chicanos protesting the Vietnam War and the lack of opportunities for Latinos in education, politics and business. The protest march, which Latino activists say was the largest political gathering of people of Mexican descent in U. S. history, turned violent when police clashed with activists.
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