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Chicano Studies

NEWS
December 3, 1995 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The recent legal victory by Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna in his age discrimination lawsuit against the University of California not only vindicated a prominent figure in Chicano studies but underscored a provocative debate about the evolving field and its future course.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1993 | LARRY GORDON and MARINA DUNDJERSKI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Protesting UCLA's recent decision not to give Chicano studies full departmental status, demonstrators occupied the faculty center for several hours Tuesday, breaking windows and damaging computers and artwork. Police arrested about 90 protesters, including 10 on misdemeanor counts and the rest on felony vandalism charges. UCLA officials estimated damage at $35,000 to $50,000.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Reaching a compromise that bolsters UCLA's Chicano studies program, nine hunger strikers ended their 14-day fast Monday with symbolic bites of tortillas and claims of victory that were disputed by campus administrators. The hunger strikers and their supporters quickly began a celebration in the tent city they erected on the grassy quad outside Murphy Hall, the UCLA administration center. Chants of "Chicano power!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1995 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doing what he has done for most of his life, Cal State Northridge professor Rodolfo Acuna lectured a federal court jury this week, standing before blown-up copies of documents and highlighting key phrases he said proved that the University of California refused to hire him because of age bias.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1993 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
As the hunger strike over the Chicano studies controversy at UCLA went into its 11th day, hopes for a quick compromise foundered Friday with strikers insisting on much higher funding for the program. However, negotiations between the strikers and the administration intensified with a major political summit at the Westwood campus's faculty center and quieter, but substantial chats in the strikers' tents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1993 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the back of the sweltering tent that houses her and the other UCLA hunger strikers, Norma Montanez sat quietly, clutching an eagle feather. As she closed her eyes and sipped some water, a man dressed as an Aztec "spiritual warrior" hovered nearby, watching as she and her fellow protesters struggled through another day without food or even vitamin-enriched water, holding out for a Chicano studies department on the sprawling campus.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | LARRY GORDON and SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After hundreds of demonstrators marched 14 miles across Los Angeles to show support for nine UCLA hunger strikers, negotiators worked into the night Saturday but failed to resolve a nearly 2-week-old dispute over establishing a separate Chicano studies department. A closed-door session in Murphy Hall on Saturday afternoon marked the first time that all nine hunger strikers had met with high-ranking representatives of UCLA Chancellor Charles E. Young since May 25.
NATIONAL
May 12, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
A bill that aims to ban ethnic studies in Arizona schools was signed into law Tuesday by Gov. Jan Brewer, cheering critics who called such classes divisive and alarming others who said it's yet another law targeting Latinos in the state. The move comes less than 20 days after Brewer signed a controversial immigration bill that has caused widespread protests against the state. The governor's press office did not return requests for comment Tuesday evening. HB 2281 bans schools from teaching classes that are designed for students of a particular ethnic group, promote resentment or advocate ethnic solidarity over treating pupils as individuals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2003 | Peter Y. Hong, Times Staff Writer
Adolfo Bermeo is leading a classroom of rapt UCLA undergraduates in a discussion of the 1980s civil war in Guatemala. "Have the issues that caused the unrest and upheaval," he asks, "... those that caused the social fabric of the society to be torn" gone away? The historian and his students are talking about poverty and oppression far from their peaceful Westwood campus. But the question could just as well apply to their course in UCLA's Chicana and Chicano Studies program.
NEWS
June 6, 1993 | MARY ANNE PEREZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Maria Lara, the road that led to her taking part in a hunger strike for a Chicano studies department at UCLA traveled through the Eastside and South-Central. Lara, 21, is a Roosevelt High School graduate and often catches a bus from her South-Central neighborhood for the 1 1/2-hour trip to UCLA.
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