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Chickenpox

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NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Deaths from chickenpox have dropped dramatically, and are almost nonexistent, since it became routine to vaccinate against the itchy illness.   The death rate from the virus dropped 88% in the 12 years since the varicella vaccine was introduced in 1995, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.   The drop among children and adolescents (under 20 years) was even greater - 97% in the same time period. The researchers, from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, reported the trend online Monday in Pediatrics .   A success, yes, particularly for children.
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NEWS
July 25, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
Deaths from chickenpox have dropped dramatically, and are almost nonexistent, since it became routine to vaccinate against the itchy illness.   The death rate from the virus dropped 88% in the 12 years since the varicella vaccine was introduced in 1995, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.   The drop among children and adolescents (under 20 years) was even greater - 97% in the same time period. The researchers, from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, reported the trend online Monday in Pediatrics .   A success, yes, particularly for children.
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NEWS
June 14, 1995 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
Chickenpox is a highly contagious viral infection that begins as an itchy rash, which progresses to blisters that dry and scab. * Ninety percent of people in a household who have not had chickenpox probably will come down with it if exposed to an infected family member. * About 4 million cases of chickenpox occur each year, with 90% of those affected younger than 15. * Complications can include secondary bacterial infection of skin lesions, encephalitis and pneumonia.
SPORTS
April 20, 2011 | By Mike Bresnahan
Are the Lakers done with chickenpox? A Lakers official knocked on a nearby table. Hard. It wasn't even wood, but the point was understood. The Lakers have plenty on their minds right now, but they're hoping for the best medically for another handful of days. Steve Blake was diagnosed with the illness April 12, and the typical incubation period is two weeks. Three Lakers have never had chickenpox — Kobe Bryant , Ron Artest and Andrew Bynum — but they've all had the vaccine in the past, reducing the chances of getting it. Blake returned to the court Wednesday against New Orleans after missing three games because of an illness mainly reserved for children.
SCIENCE
January 5, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Children whose parents refuse to let them be vaccinated for chickenpox are nine times as likely as vaccinated children to develop chickenpox that requires medical attention, researchers reported Monday. Although the conclusion may seem self-evident, it reflects a growing problem with childhood immunizations, said epidemiologist Jason M. Glanz of Kaiser Permanente's Institute for Health Research in Denver, the lead author of the report in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.
NEWS
May 2, 1995 | Associated Press
Merck & Co. on Monday began shipping millions of doses of the nation's first chickenpox vaccine, Varivax. About 4 million Americans, mostly children, get chickenpox every year. Typically it's a nuisance disease, keeping bump-covered students out of school for about a week. But it can be deadly--it kills up to 100 people annually and hospitalizes 9,300. Chickenpox is most dangerous to infants, adults and people with weakened immunity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National health researchers have picked the Antelope Valley as one of three places where they will track the effectiveness of a new chickenpox vaccine. By tracking chickenpox cases in the high desert before and after the new vaccine is released nationwide, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta hope to see how much progress is being made in eradicating the pesky, sometimes deadly illness.
HEALTH
March 19, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Merck's chickenpox vaccine Varivax not only loses its effectiveness after a while, but it also has changed the profile of the disease in the population, U.S. researchers reported Wednesday. The study confirmed what doctors widely knew -- that the vaccine's protection does not last long.
NEWS
May 10, 1995
Beginning this month, a vaccine is available for chickenpox, a disease that strikes nearly 4 million people a year in the United States. Though more of a nuisance than a danger, chickenpox nonetheless kills 100 Americans a year. Here is a look at how the Varivax vaccine works and a review of how other major vaccines have performed: Q & A What is chickenpox?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A drug used to treat genital herpes has been found to speed up children's recovery from chickenpox, a University of Minnesota study says. Acyclovir reduced the number of itchy blisters and shortened by a day the normal five-day course of chickenpox in 50 Twin Cities children who received the drug, according to a report in this month's Journal of Pediatrics. Acyclovir is "a safe and effective treatment" for the illness, which almost every American gets sometime during childhood, said Dr.
SPORTS
April 18, 2011 | By Mike Bresnahan
Steve Blake will play in Game 2. So will the Lakers, presumably. They're certainly studying enough, spending two hours in video review Monday and enduring enough stops and starts at the hands of Coach Phil Jackson to cause a headache. "We went over everything, pretty much," Andrew Bynum said. The Lakers needed to after their 109-100 loss to New Orleans in the playoff opener. Whittling away the Lakers' comfort margin in the playoffs Chris Paul ripped apart their defense, Pau Gasol imploded on offense and their overall play was no better than "speckled," as Jackson called Blake's appearance a few days ago. Blake is over his bout with chickenpox and can only help the Lakers' effort Wednesday to stop Paul, who had 33 points, 14 assists, seven rebounds and a brush with history in Game 1. It was the fifth time in 3,272 previous playoff games that anybody had as many points, assists and rebounds.
SCIENCE
January 5, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Children whose parents refuse to let them be vaccinated for chickenpox are nine times as likely as vaccinated children to develop chickenpox that requires medical attention, researchers reported Monday. Although the conclusion may seem self-evident, it reflects a growing problem with childhood immunizations, said epidemiologist Jason M. Glanz of Kaiser Permanente's Institute for Health Research in Denver, the lead author of the report in the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.
HEALTH
April 23, 2007 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
The chickenpox vaccine has not been a slam-dunk success. With some people, it hasn't scored any points at all. The varicella vaccine was introduced in the United States in 1995 as a single shot given to children ages 12 to 18 months, and by many accounts, the program has been effective. A generation of children has now been vaccinated against chickenpox, and cases of the disease have dropped by 85% since 1995. Deaths from severe cases of the disease fell from 124 in 1994 to 26 in 2001.
HEALTH
March 19, 2007 | From Times wire reports
Merck's chickenpox vaccine Varivax not only loses its effectiveness after a while, but it also has changed the profile of the disease in the population, U.S. researchers reported Wednesday. The study confirmed what doctors widely knew -- that the vaccine's protection does not last long.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2005 | From Reuters
A new vaccine that combines four childhood immunizations has won approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Merck & Co. said Tuesday. The vaccine, called Proquad, is approved to protect children 12 months to 12 years of age against measles, mumps, rubella and chickenpox.
SCIENCE
August 18, 2005 | Alex Raksin, Times Staff Writer
The start of infant chickenpox vaccinations a decade ago has led to an 88% decline in hospitalizations and a 59% drop in doctor's visits, according to a study published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Deaths have also dropped, from about 150 a year before the immunization program to an average of 66, according to recent statistics.
HEALTH
May 3, 2004 | Valerie Ulene, Special to The Times
Before the introduction of a vaccine to prevent chickenpox, the fever, blistering rash and severe itching associated with the disease were considered a childhood rite of passage. Although the symptoms generally faded quickly, the potential consequences for those who had this infection extend well into adulthood. The virus responsible for chickenpox -- varicella-zoster -- doesn't disappear when the blisters heal.
HEALTH
February 23, 2004 | Jane E. Allen
Because some children vaccinated against chickenpox eventually develop the disease, researchers at Yale University decided to test the immunization's effectiveness. They found that protection is strongest in the first year after the varicella vaccine is given -- with a 97% prevention rate -- but that the effectiveness drops to 86% in the second year and 81% in the seventh and eighth years.
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