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Chief Bernard Parks

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1998
The Los Angeles Police Commission does not have to be at war with the police chief to do its job properly (May 12). President Edith Perez and her Police Commission are doing a good job, as is Chief Bernard Parks. Let's get behind them and make this an even better place to live. JOHN C. ARGUE Los Angeles
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 2, 2002
"Pick the Best Chief, Period" (editorial, July 29) says little about what's needed at the LAPD but speaks volumes about your animus toward the department and the 8,000-plus men and women who daily risk their lives to keep you safe. In a poll conducted in January, 93% of rank-and-file officers of the LAPD voted "no confidence" in Chief Bernard Parks. You called that--and the resulting Police Protective League campaign for a new chief--a hardball tactic. We call it democracy in action. We think that all Los Angeles residents agree that we need safe streets; we need a Police Department that operates in partnership with our community; we need to cut crime; we need to continue reform; and we need more officers to get our department up to full strength.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1998
Re "New LAPD Complaint-Logging System Makes Mark," Feb. 25: It's long overdue. Just think, if the logging system had been implemented prior to the early '90s, the Rodney King beating or the tragic 1992 L.A. riot most likely would not have occurred. Congratulations to Chief Bernard Parks for implementing the new system. BARBARA HOBBS Gardena
OPINION
July 13, 2002
Re "Crowded Field Runs for Top Job at LAPD," July 7: The initial stages of the race to become the new chief of the LAPD have already distinguished the professional politicians from the real leaders among the candidates. For the last five years, Angelenos lived under the ever-arrogant Chief Bernard Parks, who was the consummate politician but short on leadership skills. Thus the mess that we are currently in, with rising crime and a demoralized, low number of officers. Candidates Mark Kroeker (Portland, Ore., police chief)
OPINION
January 7, 2002
I am disgusted with Councilman Nate Holden's allegations that the grievances against Chief Bernard Parks aired by the rank and file of the LAPD "could very well be" based on racial animus (Dec. 29). This heinous allegation was made with no evidence to support it and is a slanderous attack on the representative body of close to 8,000 police officers. Racism and racial bias are serious issues, not some tool to be utilized, in the form of false accusations, for political, professional or personal gain.
OPINION
December 19, 1999
Re "Rampart Probe May Now Affect Over 3,000 Cases," Dec. 15: I think that, rather than using taxpayers' money to review numerous cases, the district attorney's office should only review additional cases based on requests from convicted felons. If a person behind bars feels that he was wrongfully convicted as a result of testimony by Rampart's officers, then the case should be reviewed. This would save the taxpayers money. Instead of helping Chief Bernard Parks to get rid of officers who do not "deserve to wear the badge," I think that the goals and objectives should be to examine the current LAPD policy and procedures and make and/or implement timely changes to prevent future police brutality and/or cover-ups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1998
I find it appalling that Chief Bernard Parks would write that letter (April 17). As a former police officer in the L.A. area, I am here to state that it is a common practice to continue questioning after rights have been read. You just state in your report that the suspect spontaneously made statements. This is common practice which is passed down from the experienced officers to probationary officers. It's creative report writing and any police official reading this is doing so with a smirk on his face saying, "That's right."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1998
Re "City's First Police Watchdog Resigns Post," Nov. 11: The only reason Katherine Mader resigned her position as inspector general of the LAPD is solely because of politics or, more correctly, political correctness. Chief Bernard Parks wants his way, no matter what the system of checks and balances or the Christopher Commission says, and if someone poses a threat to his fiefdom, well, they'll just have to go. The only way to put this in proper perspective is to ask yourself a simple question: What would the Police Commission do about the current flap if the chief of police was Daryl Gates instead of Parks?
OPINION
July 29, 2001
Re "LAPD Tries to Lure Its Retirees Back to Work," July 24: I retired from the LAPD last March after 24 years of service. I left because I was angered at what my department had become and felt I had no options. The LAPD's problem in retention, and to a lesser degree in recruitment, stems not from a lack of quality people but from an adversarial management philosophy, draconian punishment and bosses who know little about effective management and nothing about leadership. They are, once again, attempting to apply Band-Aid treatment to a critically ill patient.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1998 | JEAN MERL
With quiet tenacity, Tom Bradley, grandson of slaves, overcame the twin bonds of poverty and racism to become Los Angeles' first African American mayor, a post he held for an unprecedented five terms. During his tenure, from 1973 to 1993, the city changed from a white-dominated collection of suburbs into one of the most diverse metropolises in the world and a major center of international trade and culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2002 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A decade after the Rodney King beating, the Los Angeles Police Department has become "by and large successful" in curbing misbehavior by following up on complaints, Inspector General Jeffrey C. Eglash has concluded. The Eglash report, released just two days after the forced retirement of former Chief Bernard C. Parks, gives a generally positive appraisal of many of the changes in LAPD discipline during his term and identifies areas in which improvement is needed.
NEWS
April 10, 2002
Chief Parks has served 37 years in the Los Angeles Police Department. Here are some of the milestones in his career: February 1965: Enters police academy at LAPD. Works in traffic division initially. * August 1977: Is named a captain after stints as a sergeant and detective. * July 1980: Promoted to the rank of commander. February 1988: Named deputy chief. * June 1992: The Police Commission, haunted by the 1992 riots, appoints outsider Willie L. Williams as police chief.
OPINION
March 14, 2002
Instead of cutting back officers from crucial programs such as DARE that educate young children on the dangers of drugs, Chief Bernard Parks should clear out the sixth floor at Parker Center to put more officers back on patrol ("LAPD's Elite Units Being Scaled Back," March 10). His deputy chiefs and commanders all have aides and sworn personnel who are lieutenants, sergeants and P3s who are doing clerical work that civilians can do. Parks should get rid of his driver, aide and bodyguard--who are also sworn and who accompany him to all the events he attends and are paid for by my tax dollars.
OPINION
February 20, 2002
I was saddened and outraged to read of the two African American ministers, bolstered by three dozen other Christian men of the cloth ("a preacher called by God," one of them described himself), charging Mayor James Hahn with attempting to bribe them into silence ("Clergy Scorn Funds Hahn Offered," Feb. 14). Here are men who have known and trusted the mayor for 20 years, who have now taken the moral low road with unsubstantiated charges. Is their cause so desperate that they must resort to this?
OPINION
February 15, 2002
Re "Teamsters Seeking to Represent the LAPD," Feb. 12: So the rank and file of the LAPD are considering having the Teamsters represent them. Let me understand this. They want to be represented by the same Teamsters Union once headed by the apparently late Jimmy Hoffa, who it seems has met a mob ending. The same Teamsters Union that was taken over by a federal supervisor in face of rampant internal corruption. The same Teamsters Union that has used mob-style enforcement and lead pipes in support of its "labor actions," and has destroyed the property of those who have had the temerity to cross its picket lines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2002
After nearly 20 years of honorable service, I left the LAPD on a beautiful, clear day in 1999--disciplined for not calling the station to see if rain was forecast. As a lifelong L.A. resident and LAPD officer, I have been honored to have served among some of the most dedicated and caring individuals I've ever met. With them, I have witnessed humanity at its best and worst. Throughout my career, neither Chief Bernard Parks nor the City Council (except for council freshmen) ever demonstrated any practical evidence to reform the LAPD.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2000
Re "Families Decry Wide Attention to Death of Chief's Granddaughter," June 6: While I sympathize with the families, surely they must understand that each tragic death in this country cannot receive the same level of media attention. So many tragic deaths are reported. The death of Lori Gonzalez took these deaths out of the common level and bought home the fact that we are all at risk. The Million Mom March bought home the risk that we all face. Governments cannot fund every organization that forms against violence.
OPINION
June 24, 2001
Of course Chief Bernard Parks will agree to a three-day week for LAPD officers (June 20). Mayor-elect James Hahn was the LAPD-endorsed candidate, a foot-dragger on LAPD reform while city attorney and the only mayoral candidate who did not declare his intention to replace Parks if elected. Although comparisons between Hahn and Sam Yorty were generally unjustified, a return to the bad old days of uncontrolled police power is certain. Todd Engle Los Angeles After all of the hue and cry that occurred when Parks moved senior lead officers from their trailers to patrol cars to conduct their problem-solving duties, I find it incredible that there appears to be no objection to Hahn's approval of the police union's plan to turn the LAPD into a part-time police force.
OPINION
February 10, 2002
How unfortunate that Los Angeles Mayor James Hahn has capitulated to the police union. Although he, erroneously, offers up other reasons for his lack of support for Chief Bernard Parks, the real reason is the political muscle of the Police Protective League. Now, nowhere in California can a police chief survive without constantly appeasing the union types. The bottom line is, the LAPD needs more discipline, not less, and Parks has shown the courage necessary to make the Los Angeles Police Department, once again, the epitome of professional law enforcement.
OPINION
February 8, 2002
Re "Hahn Explains Stance on Chief; Many Express Anger," Feb. 6: It was inappropriate for Mayor James Hahn to announce his opinion when we have a Police Commission--which he appointed--and a charter procedure to determine the choice. Further, why criticize Chief Bernard Parks for the disciplinary measures he instituted while acknowledging the existent problems in the Los Angeles Police Department? The decision should be based on merit, not racial issues, which make media comments attributed to members of the black community referring to "being betrayed" seem inappropriate.
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