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Chief Executive Steve Jobs

BUSINESS
May 6, 2006 | From Associated Press
Shareholders of Pixar Animation Studios voted to approve the company's acquisition by Walt Disney Co. for $7.4 billion in stock. The vote made the studio a subsidiary of Disney and made Pixar Chief Executive Steve Jobs the largest holder of Disney stock, with about a 7% stake. The deal is aimed at restoring Disney's luster as a leader in animated films. Disney's efforts have faltered in the last 10 years while Pixar's films have been huge successes.
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BUSINESS
February 16, 1998 | Associated Press
Officials at Pixar, the company that created the computer graphics for the movie "Toy Story," have filed suit over an anonymous e-mail message that revealed the salaries of the company's 400 employees. The e-mail distributed two weeks ago was attributed to Pixar Chief Executive Steve Jobs, who has denied sending it.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Apple Computer Inc. Chief Executive Steve Jobs introduced a 30-inch "cinema" flat-panel screen that he said was the biggest high-resolution display ever and showed off the next version of the company's software. Apple's monitor can handle as many as 4 million pixels used to measure color in pictures. That's 77% more than 23-inch monitors, Jobs told 5,000 developers at the company's conference in San Francisco.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Apple Computer Inc., which gets a third of its sales from iPod music players, started an iTunes online music store in Japan on Thursday that offered more than 1 million songs, including Rolling Stones recordings that have never been released for downloading on the Internet. Songs from 15 Japanese record companies will be available for downloading, Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs said at a Tokyo news conference that featured a performance by Grammy award-winning singer Beck.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Apple Inc. co-founder and Chief Executive Steve Jobs has an "excellent prognosis," a doctor at a Tennessee hospital said, confirming that Jobs had a liver transplant there. "He received a liver transplant because he was . . . the sickest patient on the waiting list at the time a donor organ became available," said James D. Eason, chief of transplantation at Methodist University Hospital Transplant Institute in Memphis. "Mr. Jobs is now recovering well and has an excellent prognosis."
BUSINESS
September 23, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Warner Music Group Inc. Chief Executive Edgar Bronfman Jr. said the prices of downloaded songs should vary depending on popularity and called Apple Computer Inc.'s flat 99-cent charge unfair. Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs said this week that charging more for songs downloaded from his company's iTunes unit would prompt consumers to get their music illegally. Jobs also said record companies were "getting greedy" when they pushed for higher prices.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2008 | From Reuters
. -- Apple Inc. has no plans to declare a dividend or buy back its stock, Chief Executive Steve Jobs told the company's annual shareholder meeting Tuesday, adding that iPhone sales were on track. Jobs said he was confident Apple would hit its 2008 sales target of 10 million iPhones, a figure that some analysts have questioned, and executives said the iPhone would reach Asian markets this year.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Apple Computer Inc. named Niehaus Ryan Group Inc. as its public relations agency, completing a changeover of outside marketing companies orchestrated by interim Chief Executive Steve Jobs. Apple last month switched advertising agencies, terminating BBDO Worldwide and rehiring TBWA Chiat/Day, the firm that created a now-legendary television ad introducing the Macintosh computer in 1984. Niehaus Ryan Group, also known as NRG, replaces Burson-Marsteller.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2013 | By Adam Palin
Please concentrate. Your ability to focus productively is being undermined by the daily bombardment of emails, text messages and audio-visual stimulation. This threat demands our attention, Daniel Goleman writes, because focus is the secret of success. A psychologist, former science journalist at the New York Times and author of the bestselling book "Emotional Intelligence," Goleman appears to have the measure of his readers. In his new book, "Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence," he cleverly employs short chapters littered with case studies to engage professionals swimming against a tide of electronic correspondence.
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