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Child Abandonment China

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January 6, 1996 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Zhang Shuyun is a 53-year-old graduate of Beijing Medical University who worked at the Shanghai Children's Welfare Institute as a laboratory technician. Beginning in 1989, she and several colleagues at the institute acted to reform what they believed was a policy of neglect at the orphanage that led to the deaths of hundreds of abandoned infants. After her appeals to authorities ended in failure, Zhang collected case records on several hundred orphans and fled overseas.
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NEWS
January 6, 1996 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Zhang Shuyun is a 53-year-old graduate of Beijing Medical University who worked at the Shanghai Children's Welfare Institute as a laboratory technician. Beginning in 1989, she and several colleagues at the institute acted to reform what they believed was a policy of neglect at the orphanage that led to the deaths of hundreds of abandoned infants. After her appeals to authorities ended in failure, Zhang collected case records on several hundred orphans and fled overseas.
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NEWS
January 6, 1996 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international human rights organization has alleged that thousands of abandoned children die unnecessarily each year in Chinese state orphanages under a system of "malign neglect" tied to population-control policies and a booming adoption trade. A new 331-page report by the New York-based Human Rights Watch cites government statistics to show that more than half of the children admitted to state orphanages ultimately die there, usually in their first year of life.
NEWS
January 6, 1996 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international human rights organization has alleged that thousands of abandoned children die unnecessarily each year in Chinese state orphanages under a system of "malign neglect" tied to population-control policies and a booming adoption trade. A new 331-page report by the New York-based Human Rights Watch cites government statistics to show that more than half of the children admitted to state orphanages ultimately die there, usually in their first year of life.
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