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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1988
C. David Baker, running for Congress, has made family values a cornerstone of his campaign but was absent to vote on the child-care center recommendation in Irvine last Tuesday. There is a lot of lip service for the family, but where is an active commitment to the advocacy of advancing the general welfare of children? SUSAN SEITZ Irvine
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BUSINESS
October 4, 2009
School has started again, but that doesn't mean those pesky child-care issues have been resolved. With budgets tight, many families find it's getting harder to pay for day-care. That means Junior might end up sitting on Mom's desk every other Friday. We want your questions about children and the workplace. If your child is sick, is it OK for you to take a sick day? What if your office mate spends hours on the phone dealing with his children and their schedules? And what if the boss' kid is your intern, and the kid is not so sharp?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1988
Poor George. He'll never learn. He thinks that suddenly (and oh so conveniently) springing forth with a child-care proposal will woo us into forgetting his condescending positions on issues that are paramount to women. He thinks we'll forget that he doesn't support a woman's right to control her own body, and therefore her own destiny. He thinks we'll forget that he doesn't support absolute equal rights for women under the law. Wrong, George. We won't forget. BARBARA MARTINEZ North Orange County NOW Santa Ana
BUSINESS
September 23, 2009
School has started again, but that doesn't mean those pesky child-care issues have been resolved. With budgets tight, many families find it's getting harder to pay for day care. That means Junior might end up sitting on Mom's desk every other Friday. We're looking for your questions about children and the workplace. If your child is sick, is it OK for you to take a sick day? What if your office mate spends hours on the phone dealing with his children and their schedules? And what if the boss' kid is your intern, and the kid is not so sharp?
NATIONAL
May 2, 2002 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major Republican welfare plan is sparking a new dispute over child care, with Democrats arguing that a big spending hike is crucial to a goal shared by both parties: helping more low-income mothers go to work. The flare-up over child care came Wednesday as a House committee was finishing its work on the $16.5-billion welfare plan, which is expected to pass the Republican-controlled chamber before Memorial Day.
MAGAZINE
November 6, 1988
The Santa Monica Child Care Task Force thanks you for introducing so many new people to the magnitude of problems accompanying the child-care issue. And we applaud you for doing it in an article full of hope and inspiration in the form of Bill Ewing. There is a problem, and there are solutions. LAUREN RAAB WEISSMAN Santa Monica
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1997
The clock is ticking for California welfare recipients. Federal law requires that 227,500 find jobs next year. Real progress on that front would make winners of both the former recipients and the state, providing a better economic future for families and lower government welfare costs. The key is to keep people in stable jobs, not bouncing on and off the dole as discouragement increases on all sides.
NATIONAL
October 6, 2002 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like other parents throughout the United States, Sonya Brown scrambles every day to meet commitments for work and the care of her young child. For Brown, 25, who juggles her $6.15-an-hour job with college courses, a government benefit pays for her 3-year-old son's day care. Without it, she says, "I would be in big trouble." Rashida Walker, 32, is already struggling.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2002 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A major Republican welfare plan is sparking a new dispute over child care, with Democrats arguing that a big spending hike is crucial to a goal shared by both parties: helping more low-income mothers go to work. The flare-up over child care came Wednesday as a House committee was finishing its work on the $16.5-billion welfare plan, which is expected to pass the Republican-controlled chamber before Memorial Day.
NEWS
June 13, 1999 | CATHLEEN DECKER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
For years, the phrase "Mommy Wars" has defined the battle lines between mothers employed outside the home and mothers employed inside--each sharing a certain bleary-eyed exhaustion but divided along a stark demilitarized zone. A new Times poll shows that the divide is somewhat exaggerated. When it comes to responsibilities over children, child care decisions and communication with their children--among other issues--women in both camps hold markedly similar views.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1997
The clock is ticking for California welfare recipients. Federal law requires that 227,500 find jobs next year. Real progress on that front would make winners of both the former recipients and the state, providing a better economic future for families and lower government welfare costs. The key is to keep people in stable jobs, not bouncing on and off the dole as discouragement increases on all sides.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996
In response to an ongoing battle over a Northridge child-care center, city officials on unveiled a set of criteria Wednesday for residential child-care centers with more than 12 children. City officials hope that the guidelines will make it easier to open child-care facilities in residential areas to meet the growing demand for inexpensive care in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1994
Most mothers with jobs have faced the child care issue, and few have come out of the battle unbloodied. Tough choices have to be made about who provides the care, in what location and at what price. In fact, the experts say, quality child care usually is available. Being able to afford that quality care is another story.
NEWS
April 23, 1990 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Meredith Vieira, 36, replaced Diane Sawyer and joined CBS' "60 Minutes" television show last year, she took the most important guy in her life to her contract negotiations: her baby boy Ben. That astute move, showing her new employers "where my priorities are," threw her soon-to-be bosses "totally off," though for her it was a breakthrough in trying to balance career and family concerns, Vieira told participants at a weekend symposium on men, women and the media.
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