Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsChild Development
IN THE NEWS

Child Development

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 24, 1993 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mitchell can't stop washing his hands. Philip has trouble keeping his clothes on--even in cold weather. And Luke goes everywhere with a pair of men's bikini underpants around his neck. Bizarre behavior? Maybe by adult standards, but not for little kids. For 4-year-old Philip, 2-year-old Luke and 3-year-old Mitchell, it's just a part of growing up. Parents may be worried when children's habits mimic frightening adult disorders, but the experts say: Relax.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Two college presidents and an acting chancellor were named by the Los Angeles Community College District Board of Trustees on Wednesday. Laurence B. Frank, who is deputy chief of staff for Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, will become the new president of Los Angeles Trade - Technical College effective July 1.  He will succeed current President Roland “Chip” Chapdelaine, who is retiring after seven years at the downtown Los Angeles campus....
Advertisement
NEWS
June 24, 1993
Glendale Community College associate professor of child development Melita Baumann has been honored by the school's Academic Senate as its seventh annual Distinguished Faculty Award winner. Baumann, a Glendale resident, was recognized for her work establishing the college's Child Development Center, which serves as a child-care center, a parent education facility and an academic program for students entering the field.
NATIONAL
April 5, 2013 | By David G. Savage and Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - During last week's Supreme Court arguments on gay marriage, Justice Antonin Scalia asserted that "there's considerable disagreement" among experts over whether "raising a child in a single-sex family is harmful or not. " Two other justices agreed that gay parenting was a new and uncertain development. Those comments startled child development experts as well as advocates of gay marriage, because there is considerable research showing children of gay parents do not have more problems than others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1994 | PHYLLIS W. JORDAN
Capitalizing on a growing interest in child development courses, Cal State Northridge's Ventura Campus has increased its annual course offerings and is holding an orientation at 7:30 tonight to draw new students. Academic advisers will explain the course work and goals of the two-year bachelor's degree program, which forms a base for preschool teachers and for pursuing further education degrees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2007 | Tami Abdollah, Times Staff Writer
Wearing little white hard hats, four preschool-age children gleefully hoisted lumps of dirt in the air with small golden shovels as Los Angeles Mission College broke ground Monday on a 27,000-square-foot child development center that will cost $9.1 million. About half the money will come from the $2.2-billion in bond money approved by voters in 2001 and 2003 and used by the Los Angeles Community College District to fund about 110 projects completed to date.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers with the Santa Monica-based Rand Corp. will be knocking on doors across Los Angeles County seeking families to participate in a nationwide study on the influence of neighborhoods on child social and educational development. The Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey, announced Wednesday, will survey 1,000 families in 65 neighborhoods, interviewing them about health insurance, child care, readiness for school and neighborhood life.
NEWS
April 13, 1994
Ruth Schwartz Pearce, 72, founding president of the Assn. of Child Development Specialists. Mrs. Pearce began her career in Los Angeles-area cooperative nursery schools and in 1958 was hired by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center as founding director of its Therapeutic Nursery School for children with emotional problems. When Head Start began in the mid-1960s, she trained some of the program's first teachers in Los Angeles. In 1972, Mrs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joseph Church, 85, a psychology professor and author who wrote two well-regarded texts on child development, died Dec. 23 in New York City, Associated Press reported. Church co-wrote "Childhood and Adolescence: A Psychology of the Growing Person" with L. Joseph Stone. Published in 1957, the book proposed a model of development less rigid than the dominant views of the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1992 | SUSAN M. TYRRELL
The on-campus child development center at Valley College in Van Nuys is thriving, despite budget cuts and other obstacles. The center is licensed for 62 children at one time and is usually full. Between 90 and 100 children are at the center sometime during the course of a day. In the evening, it is licensed for 28 children, and about 75 visit the center during evening hours in the course of a week. Another 75 children are on a waiting list for a day program for the preschool children.
SCIENCE
July 24, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
Children who grow up in institutions instead of with families have major deficits in brain development, a study of Romanian orphans has shown. The findings, published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, underscore the importance of an enriched environment during infancy and childhood and may help explain the increased rates of depression and anxiety disorders known to exist among institutionalized children....
HEALTH
August 1, 2011 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Leslie Walden's daughter Kennedy will turn 5 in October, which makes her eligible to start kindergarten. But the school year will begin without her. Kennedy is a bright and enthusiastic child, her preschool teacher said — but she wasn't quite mature enough for the private-school kindergarten Walden and her husband had been considering. That assessment echoed Walden's motherly instincts. "I personally felt like [she] is better off being the oldest kid in the group rather than trying to catch up," said Walden, an attorney who lives in Playa Vista.
HEALTH
July 5, 2011 | By Alan Zarembo, Los Angeles Times
Environmental factors may be more important than genes in determining whether a child develops autism, according to a controversial new analysis of the disorder in twins. That finding runs counter to decades of prior research, which has generally found that genetic inheritance is the biggest determinant of a child's risk of autism. The authors of the new study, published online Monday by the journal Archives of General Psychiatry, came to their conclusion after studying 192 pairs of identical and fraternal twins in which at least one twin met clinical criteria for the neurodevelopment disorder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2011 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
A group of agencies that operate programs for children in California is suing Gov. Jerry Brown over legislation he signed to shift nearly $1 billion away from their funds to help close the state's budget deficit. The lawsuit, filed Tuesday, marks the first legal challenge to Brown's budget plan. California voters approved a tax on tobacco products in 1998 to fund development programs for children younger than 5. Brown recently signed a law that moves $950 million from county commissions that run those programs.
NEWS
October 5, 2010
Drinking during pregnancy is considered a serious no-no by many women, and there's evidence to show that heavy imbibing while pregnant may be linked with developmental problems in children. But a new study finds that babies born of light drinkers may not show any greater risk of cognitive or emotional problems than women who abstain from alcohol during pregnancy. The research, published online Tuesday in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, analyzed data from a UK cohort study of 11,513 children born between 2000 and 2002.
SCIENCE
February 2, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
An infection of the uterine cavity during pregnancy combined with premature birth doubles the risk that an African American child will develop asthma, researchers have found. The combination also increases risk for some other ethnicities, though less severely. About 8% of pregnancies are marked by such bacterial infections, called chorioamnionitis, but it is not yet clear what proportion of asthma is induced by them, said the lead author, Dr. Darios Getahun of Kaiser Permanente's Department of Research and Evaluation in Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001
Millie Almy, a pioneering researcher in early childhood development and a professor emeritus at UC Berkeley, died Aug. 15 at her home in Berkeley. She was 86. Almy was an advocate of child development as a science on which to base the education of preschool children. Her research helped to establish the importance of play in a child's healthy development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2000 | INDRANEEL SUR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Watching the 4-year-olds climb up instead of slip down the plastic slide taught Grover Cleveland High School senior Juan Sanchez something about how preschoolers behave. "Some don't want to follow the rules," he said. "They want to go their own way." The chutes and ladders of the new playground that opened Tuesday may be all fun and games for the preschoolers, but for Sanchez and nearly 180 fellow teachers-in-training, it's a learning tool.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2007 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
Edward Chang is a respected Korean American scholar of ethnic studies with a doctorate from UC Berkeley, known both in Los Angeles and Seoul. His daughter, Angie, is an honors student and speaks and writes Korean fluently. But in the eyes of some Korean immigrants, he's a failure as a father. "Other parents told me I am not a good parent -- many, many times," said Chang, 51.
HEALTH
August 27, 2007 | Melissa Healy, Times Staff Writer
At 3 and 4 years old, a child seems to define the concept of living "in the moment." She may crumple when a parent leaves or hurl a plaything when it frustrates, all with little evidence of self-awareness. Developmental psychologists have long thought that before age 5, a child is largely unable to reflect upon her thoughts, feelings or memories -- a skill that is critical to higher-order learning (not to mention self-control).
Los Angeles Times Articles
|