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Child Development

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1995 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing up in Ventura County really can make a difference. Parental involvement and other factors being equal, authorities on child development say places such as Ventura County--with built-in advantages of good schools, safe cities and relative affluence--are more likely to produce good kids who know the difference between right and wrong and who have a positive sense of self-worth. "It makes a big difference what kind of place a kid is raised in," said Barbara T.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1991 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The format is familiar: an expert dispensing advice while earnest audience members pour out their problems. Only this time, the issue at hand is not alcoholism, spousal abuse or even sex--not directly, anyway. "Is my 1-year-old ready for books?" a bespectacled father asks with almost overwhelming sincerity.
NEWS
July 10, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I don't have to learn to swim," the truculent 5-year-old declares in the locker room after a lesson with his coach. "Yes, you do have to," his impatient mother replies. "You want to go to Uncle Walter's on the lake this summer, don't you? And hurry up." "Why do we have to hurry?" "Because you have to get to computer class." Parents everywhere can empathize with a mother expressing exasperation at the dawdling of a child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2000 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After enduring months of criticism for moving too slowly, the county commission charged with distributing $11.7 million a year in cigarette tax revenues to help Ventura County children has chosen its first recipients. They range from established nonprofit programs to small day-care centers. The 25 grants made Thursday total $650,000. They include $6,300 for a program to give Ojai preschoolers play time with nursing home residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Experts on family law and child development on Friday overwhelmingly criticized a judge's ruling that gave a surrogate mother and biological father joint custody of a 16-month-old girl conceived through artificial insemination. "The judge can't be serious," said James B. Boskey, a family law professor at Seton Hall Law School in Newark, N.J. "I don't see how this could possibly be healthy for the child. This is precedent-setting in a very dangerous way."
NEWS
October 1, 1998 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Movie director Rob Reiner is in his element even though he's out of his element, sitting front and center at a state hearing, preaching in a booming voice about nurturing children from conception to kindergarten. Such stimulation "is vitamins, it is food, it is nutrition for the brain," bellows the man best known for his role as Archie Bunker's "Meathead" son-in-law.
NEWS
April 15, 2002 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Children who are outgoing and adventurous as toddlers have substantially higher IQs by the time they are preteens, according to new research by scientists studying how personality shapes intelligence. Seeking links between childhood behavior and mental ability, scientists at USC and UC Riverside compared how eagerly youngsters sought out new experiences at age 3 and how well they performed on various tests of mental ability eight years later at age 11.
NEWS
July 3, 2000 | LAURA SESSIONS STEPP, WASHINGTON POST
The "new" involved father may diaper his daughter in infancy and coach her in soccer once she starts school. But when she enters puberty, he's outta there, either because he has left home or lost heart. That, at least, is the story of many dads and daughters, according to counselors, fathering experts and young women themselves. "Girls go from being Daddy's little girl to not a part of Daddy anymore," said 19-year-old Sara Shandler.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1990 | ALFIE KOHN, Alfie Kohn is the author, most recently, of The Brighter Side of Human Nature: Altruism and Empathy in Everyday Life, to be published next month. He lives in Cambridge, Mass.
There are people who maintain that just from knowing whether someone is a first-, middle- or last-born child, they can predict that individual's personality and intelligence. But then there are also people who take horoscopes seriously. "Birth order really doesn't explain a whole lot," said Toni Falbo, an educational psychologist at the University of Texas at Austin, who has been studying the subject for 15 years. "But people like it. It's much like astrology.
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