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Child Development

ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1997 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you don't know that the first three years of life are crucial in a child's development, or how parents can help in that blossoming, you'll have a good idea by the end of tonight's celebrity-laden documentary, "I Am Your Child." Directed and co-written by Rob Reiner, the ABC program is a combination of star power, "entertainment-lite" and documentary footage about early child development and informed parenting.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1996 | DARRELL SATZMAN
A Sylmar woman was one of four people appointed by Gov. Pete Wilson this week to a statewide child development advisory committee. Kathleen V. Malaske-Samu, 45, has an extensive background in child care and children's education and has been the child care coordinator for Los Angeles County since 1988.
WORLD
June 9, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Scientists at Japan's Osaka University have developed a robot that acts like a toddler to study child development. The Child-Robot with Biomimetic Body, or CB2, is designed to move like a child between ages 1 and 3, although it stands just over 4 feet tall and weighs 73 pounds. It changes facial expressions and can rock back and forth. The robot moves smoothly with 56 actuators in lieu of muscle. It has 197 sensors for touch, small cameras working as eyes, and an audio sensor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2001 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victoria Hales marched into her supervisor's office Wednesday morning and demanded a raise for her overworked, underpaid staff of child development workers at the Colton Unified School District. A few hours later, 30 employees of the school district near San Bernardino, many of them child development workers, learned they had won the California Lottery's $15-million jackpot. The winners, who chose the cash option, will share a total of $7,743,016.
NEWS
April 18, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was no doubt the first time in U.S. history that an American president had sat in the ornate East Room of the White House to soak up four hours of baby talk. On Thursday, President Clinton and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton invited some of the country's premier experts in child development to the Executive Mansion to review dramatic new findings on the way young children's brains develop and to discuss the implications, both for public policy and parental care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1994
UC Irvine's Child Development Center is looking for children who suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder to take part in a two-year research project. The $2.5-million study, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education and National Institute of Mental Health, will look at different ways of treating the disorder. About 100 children between the ages of 7 and 9 are needed for the study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1996 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
The Child Development Center at Pierce College was recently accredited by a national professional organization known for quality early education curriculum guidelines and standards. The center is the first in the Los Angeles Community College District to receive accreditation from the National Assn. for the Education of Young Children, said center director Kathleen Reiter. "This is really an acknowledgment of programs that are doing quality work in the field," Reiter said.
NEWS
April 16, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The number of autistic children in California has exploded during the last decade, according to a new state survey released Thursday. The survey, conducted by the state Department of Developmental Services, concludes that there were 11,995 autistic children enrolled in the department's 21 regional programs in 1998, a 210% increase compared with the 3,864 enrolled in 1987.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | LYNN SMITH and BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Haunted by anxiety about spending too little time with their children, nearly 40% of fathers and 80% of mothers in Los Angeles and Orange counties say they would quit their jobs, if they could, to rear their children at home. Most parents say they are often overwhelmed by the responsibilities of child-rearing and worry about whether they are doing a good job of it, according to a Los Angeles Times-commissioned survey of 1,000 households in the two counties.
NEWS
March 11, 1998 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You love little kids. You've read the new brain research, and you recognize that a child's first years are critical to future growth and development. You understand that with the majority of mothers--not to mention fathers--in the workplace, more and more children will need quality day care and preschools. Luckily, you are willing to work for a ludicrously low salary and benefits that are measly at best, nonexistent at worst. In short, you are a perfect early-childhood educator.
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