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Child Development

HEALTH
August 19, 2002 | EMMA ROSS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
New research adds to a growing body of evidence that adult health is set to a significant degree by conditions in the womb and suggests the programming may start earlier in pregnancy than previously believed. A study published last week in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health found that fetuses with shorter thighbones at 24 weeks had higher blood pressure at the age of 6 than those with longer thighbones.
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NEWS
August 18, 2002 | BETH DONOVAN, WASHINGTON POST
When Julie and William Heflin moved into a spacious new home last year, the four children were tucked into only two of the house's six bedrooms. Close quarters, the parents figured, would foster life lessons in sharing and cooperation. "My husband's one of 13 children," Julie Heflin said. "For him, it's a matter of principle for the kids to share, and they don't mind." On weekends, she said, their three boys and one girl, ages 11 to 4, sometimes pile into one bedroom.
SCIENCE
July 29, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Zinc supplements given to infants in developing countries to improve growth and reduce susceptibility to infectious diseases could be harming the children's mental development, British researchers reported in Saturday's issue of the British journal The Lancet.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2002 | BRIAN LOWRY
Even immersed in a much-needed vacation, my commitment to this column is such that my reading list included "The Other Parent: The Inside Story of the Media's Effect on Our Children," a new book by James P. Steyer.
HEALTH
June 17, 2002 | CAROL MORELLO, WASHINGTON POST
When it comes to eating, the Gerson boys can make most parents feel as if they must be doing something wrong. At 9, Eliot knows how to draw a detailed food pyramid, sketching out the recommended servings of cereals, fruits and vegetables and the very few servings of sweets and fats. Then he adds, deadpan, "I'd prefer a fresh, juicy white peach to a strawberry ice cream." Scott is 5, and while he hankers for gummy candies, he also counts broccoli and spinach among his favorite foods.
NATIONAL
June 3, 2002 | From Associated Press
Toddlers enrolled in a federal program that coaches parents in learning techniques are less likely to need discipline and more likely to read than children not participating in Early Head Start, a government study found. The program, geared for low-income parents and their children from birth to age 3, helped families get along better and improved toddlers' scores on standardized tests, according to the study issued today.
NEWS
September 17, 2001 | LOUISE ROUG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last week, Kathryn Horton has had the same dream over and over. She is jumping out of a building. Some nights, she watches as others fall. But every night in her sleep, she replays images of horror, by now so familiar, the stuff of nightmares. "People falling--that's the only dream I have," said Horton, 28, a fund-raiser for nonprofit groups in Los Angeles. "When I wake up, it's still in my head, so I can't get away from that image." In Des Moines, her 6-year-old nephew, Alex Northington, is also troubled by nightmares.
NEWS
August 29, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just found out you're pregnant? First, call your parents. Then call Jackie. For if you wait until your fetus develops so much as fingers, Jackie Rosenberg will have no room for you and your little one in "Babies First Class," her parenting program for first-time mothers. "Right now, I am filling my class for February of '02," Rosenberg said recently at her Sherman Oaks studio. "And I've had two calls for March." Among a certain well-heeled crowd, Rosenberg is a guru.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001
Millie Almy, a pioneering researcher in early childhood development and a professor emeritus at UC Berkeley, died Aug. 15 at her home in Berkeley. She was 86. Almy was an advocate of child development as a science on which to base the education of preschool children. Her research helped to establish the importance of play in a child's healthy development.
MAGAZINE
August 12, 2001 | SUSAN STRAIGHT, Susan Straight's last story for the magazine was a profile of 10-year-old Yaminia Ubeso. Straight is the author of five novels, including "Highwire Moon" (Houghton Mifflin), which was published this week
My three daughters and I recently made our weekly pilgrimage to the video store, three miles round trip through our neighborhood. I watched my older girls, 11 and 9, ride their bikes, helmets fastened, cautious and watchful, stopping at each corner to look back at me as I walked with my 5-year-old. They know they can't ride more than two blocks ahead. Delphine, my middle child, had just told me, "Did you know we can't play dodge ball at school now?
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