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Child Development

NEWS
August 29, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just found out you're pregnant? First, call your parents. Then call Jackie. For if you wait until your fetus develops so much as fingers, Jackie Rosenberg will have no room for you and your little one in "Babies First Class," her parenting program for first-time mothers. "Right now, I am filling my class for February of '02," Rosenberg said recently at her Sherman Oaks studio. "And I've had two calls for March." Among a certain well-heeled crowd, Rosenberg is a guru.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001
Millie Almy, a pioneering researcher in early childhood development and a professor emeritus at UC Berkeley, died Aug. 15 at her home in Berkeley. She was 86. Almy was an advocate of child development as a science on which to base the education of preschool children. Her research helped to establish the importance of play in a child's healthy development.
MAGAZINE
August 12, 2001 | SUSAN STRAIGHT, Susan Straight's last story for the magazine was a profile of 10-year-old Yaminia Ubeso. Straight is the author of five novels, including "Highwire Moon" (Houghton Mifflin), which was published this week
My three daughters and I recently made our weekly pilgrimage to the video store, three miles round trip through our neighborhood. I watched my older girls, 11 and 9, ride their bikes, helmets fastened, cautious and watchful, stopping at each corner to look back at me as I walked with my 5-year-old. They know they can't ride more than two blocks ahead. Delphine, my middle child, had just told me, "Did you know we can't play dodge ball at school now?
NEWS
August 12, 2001 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When she was 18, the mother of a 21-year-old recalled, she could hardly wait to go away to school and move out of her parents' house. Most of her friends felt the same way. Nobody knew who they went out with, where they went, what they did or when they got in. Her son, on the other hand, lives at home and likes it. A junior in the Cal State system, he doesn't have to pay rent or buy groceries. "He has a TV, a computer and a double bed. What more could a guy want?
MAGAZINE
August 12, 2001 | SUSAN STRAIGHT
Surfing the Web for child safety tips and statistics can be truly frightening. ParanoidSisters.com, for example, was created by two Bay Area mothers who cover a daunting list of dangerous possibilities for children. Their site, and their corresponding books, dispense information, and often scary statistics, on child injury and deaths from numerous causes, from mini-blind cords and crib mattresses to five-gallon cleaning buckets with two inches of water inside.
NEWS
July 17, 2001 | DIANA K. SUGG, BALTIMORE SUN
They are the questions brothers and sisters have argued and anguished over since time began: Who is mom's favorite? Which of us does dad love most? From the time they are little, boys and girls notice if their mother seems to pay more attention to their oldest sister. They remember that their father went to a brother's athletic events but not their own. They yearn to be loved the way they believe their favored sibling is loved.
HEALTH
June 18, 2001 | BOB CONDOR, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
If you know about the kids-and-juice controversy among dietitians, pediatricians, parents and producers, then you realize it is one debate getting milked for all it's worth. If you don't know about the juice controversy, chances are you will benefit from understanding it. That goes for the perspectives of both kids and adults who drink juice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2001 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking issue with two decades of research findings in the politically charged arena of gay parenting, two USC professors say sexual orientation of parents makes more of a difference than researchers have been willing to admit. In a paper reexamining data from 21 studies dating to 1980, the USC sociologists argue that, while the emotional health of the children raised by homosexual and heterosexual parents is essentially the same, they diverge in some notable ways that have been downplayed.
NEWS
April 26, 2001 | JESSICA GARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week after a high-profile study cast a negative light on child care, researchers--including the study's lead statistician--are sharply questioning whether their controversial work has been misrepresented. As reported last week, the study showed that the more time preschoolers spend in child care, the more likely their teachers were to report behavior problems such as aggression and defiance in kindergarten.
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