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Child Labor Laws

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NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Susan Denley
In an interview with InStyle magazine, Salma Hayek acknowledges that people think she's beautiful, but she says she doesn't work at it. "I have never tried to be as beautiful as I can be," she said (making the rest of us feel like crumpled-up napkins). "I could do a lot more -- exercise, or not eat dessert. ... I could make bigger efforts. I don't think my first priority in life has ever been beauty. " The interview is in the July issue, on newsstands Friday. [InStyle] Zac Posen has signed on to design a collection for mass wedding-gown retailer David's Bridal.
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NEWS
July 12, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That chic and sumptuous high-pile carpet that adorns the lawyer's office in Stuttgart, Germany, or the beachfront condo in Redondo Beach may have begun its life here on a high-backed vertical loom worked by Meena, 13. Six days a week, the village girl and seven friends, who sleep in a single cramped, dark room in a dirty dormitory whose halls smell of urine, get up at 6 a.m. and, after gulping down a meager breakfast of warm tea, begin work.
OPINION
November 26, 2011
The Times' Nov. 23 editorial, "Clueless candidates," which criticized Newt Gingrich for his call to loosen child labor laws and allow kids to work as janitors at their schools, prompted reader Mike Gallagher to write the following defense of the former House speaker's proposal: "I can only assume that the editor did not work as a child, unlike the children of most small-business owners. I've never known a working kid who didn't have time for homework, so long as there wasn't a long transportation requirement.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2010 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles
The Superior Grocers supermarket chain was assessed $79,200 in fines Tuesday for allowing 16- and 17-year-old employees to operate heavy machinery in violation of child labor laws. U.S. Labor Department investigators found 40 workplace violations for the workers operating scrap-paper balers, paper box compactors, power-driven hoists and forklifts, said Deanne Amaden, a spokeswoman for the agency. "It's not just that their employees were 16 and 17, it was that these younger workers were using machinery -- heavy machinery," she said.
NEWS
November 21, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Promising “extraordinarily radical proposals to fundamentally change the culture of poverty in America,” Newt Gingrich said Friday that he would fire school janitors and pay students to clean schools instead. Speaking at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, the Republican presidential candidate and former speaker of the House challenged laws that prevent children from working certain jobs before their mid-teens. Gingrich blames “the core policies of protecting unionization and bureaucratization" for “crippling” children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1992 | Laura A. Galloway
Various Los Angeles County businesses in violation of federal child labor laws were fined a total of $79,000 by a U.S. Department of Labor strike force last month. The businesses are listed in descending order of the amount of their fines: California Pride Foods Inc. (operator of eight Little Caesar's outlets in L.A. County), Lancaster. Fifteen minors, violations of hours regulations, employment of minors in hazardous occupations, $19,200. Swedish Kitchen, 44652 N. Sierra Highway, Lancaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1998 | Associated Press
A 15-year-old Amish boy and his family are in a legal tug of war with federal child labor watchdogs. The dispute involves Daniel Mark Smucker's work around heavy presses in a harness factory, as well as other work by Amish children. "We believe that forced idleness in this age to be detrimental to our long-standing Amish way of raising our children and teaching them to become good productive citizens," Christ K.
NEWS
December 14, 1997 | MARTHA MENDOZA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Federal law says 16-year-olds may not use blowtorches to burn hair from animal carcasses in slaughterhouses. But they are allowed to work as "headskinners." These rules, and thousands more, are found in the 1938 Fair Labor Standards Act, a complex federal law with a simple goal: Keep kids safe and in school. After almost 60 years of revision, federal child labor laws address everything from the time the sun comes up to the weight of a tractor.
OPINION
November 22, 2011
It isn't just that some of the candidates for the GOP presidential nomination occasionally seem divorced from modern reality; it's that they're determined to re-fight battles that most of us thought had ended roughly a century ago. A case in point is newly inaugurated front-runner Newt Gingrich, who in a talk Monday at Harvard University denigrated federal child labor laws that date back to the 1930s. "It is tragic what we do in the poorest neighborhoods in trapping children … in child laws which are truly stupid," Gingrich said.
OPINION
November 22, 2011
It isn't just that some of the candidates for the GOP presidential nomination occasionally seem divorced from modern reality; it's that they're determined to re-fight battles that most of us thought had ended roughly a century ago. A case in point is newly inaugurated front-runner Newt Gingrich, who in a talk Monday at Harvard University denigrated federal child labor laws that date back to the 1930s. "It is tragic what we do in the poorest neighborhoods in trapping children … in child laws which are truly stupid," Gingrich said.
NEWS
November 21, 2011 | By Kim Geiger
Promising “extraordinarily radical proposals to fundamentally change the culture of poverty in America,” Newt Gingrich said Friday that he would fire school janitors and pay students to clean schools instead. Speaking at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, the Republican presidential candidate and former speaker of the House challenged laws that prevent children from working certain jobs before their mid-teens. Gingrich blames “the core policies of protecting unionization and bureaucratization" for “crippling” children.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2010 | By Colleen Mastony
Her story had been lost amid dusty records that were long ago stashed in deep storage and forgotten. Forgotten until a retired federal agent, researching the history of Chicago law enforcement, stumbled upon a mention that, in the 1890s, she had become a police officer in Chicago. The date caught his attention. A female police officer in the 1890s? Now, after three years of research, Rick Barrett, a former Drug Enforcement Administration agent and an amateur historian, says he has found definitive evidence that Marie Owens was not only the first policewoman in Chicago, but also the first known female officer in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2010 | By Steve Harvey
When you think of Babe Ruth, you might picture a newsreel shot of him bashing a home run in Yankee Stadium and then trotting around the bases on those surprisingly skinny legs of his. But one Southern California city also "had a part" in the Babe's colorful career, author Tim Grobaty points out. Long Beach arrested the Sultan of Swat on Jan. 22, 1927 -- for the crime of autographing baseballs for kids. There was more to it than that, of course. But not much more. As Grobaty tells the story in his book "Long Beach Almanac," Ruth was in town to perform three shows at the old State Theater near the Pike amusement park.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2010 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles
The Superior Grocers supermarket chain was assessed $79,200 in fines Tuesday for allowing 16- and 17-year-old employees to operate heavy machinery in violation of child labor laws. U.S. Labor Department investigators found 40 workplace violations for the workers operating scrap-paper balers, paper box compactors, power-driven hoists and forklifts, said Deanne Amaden, a spokeswoman for the agency. "It's not just that their employees were 16 and 17, it was that these younger workers were using machinery -- heavy machinery," she said.
OPINION
March 18, 2009 | TIM RUTTEN
President Obama and his administration have made a complete shambles of the AIG bailout, and the failure won't be papered over by the chief executive's populist campaign rhetoric. To call it an "outrage" doesn't begin to describe the disgraced insurance giant's payment of $165 million in bonuses to securities traders in the very division whose dealings in so-called credit default swaps was at the root of Wall Street's current meltdown.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1992 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several Ralphs supermarkets in Orange County have been cited for violating federal child labor laws. The grocery-store chain accounted for two-thirds of the 58 violations found so far by U.S. Labor Department inspectors as they examined local businesses this spring. The inspections were part of a nationwide crackdown on violators of child labor laws, the Labor Department said.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2010 | By Colleen Mastony
Her story had been lost amid dusty records that were long ago stashed in deep storage and forgotten. Forgotten until a retired federal agent, researching the history of Chicago law enforcement, stumbled upon a mention that, in the 1890s, she had become a police officer in Chicago. The date caught his attention. A female police officer in the 1890s? Now, after three years of research, Rick Barrett, a former Drug Enforcement Administration agent and an amateur historian, says he has found definitive evidence that Marie Owens was not only the first policewoman in Chicago, but also the first known female officer in the United States.
NEWS
April 27, 2008 | Valerie Bauman, Associated Press
The young workers came from Eastern Europe, Asia and Latin America, spending their money to work in summer resort towns desperate for labor. Many of them were cheated out of wages and overtime pay or docked pay to cover room and board. They often worked jobs that violated child labor laws. A state investigation last year found that nearly 200 foreign workers were cheated by several companies in the Lake George area, a collection of resort towns an hour north of Albany. The state ordered the businesses to repay the employees, plus interest, and pay state fines.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2005 | From Associated Press
Calling a federal settlement with Wal-Mart Stores Inc. a sweetheart deal, Connecticut Atty. Gen. Richard Blumenthal said Wednesday that he would ask other states to join in investigating allegations that the world's largest retailer broke child labor laws. Wal-Mart agreed to pay $135,540 to settle federal child-labor charges, the Labor Department said last weekend.
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