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Child Labor Laws

NEWS
December 14, 1997 | MARTHA MENDOZA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Federal law says 16-year-olds may not use blowtorches to burn hair from animal carcasses in slaughterhouses. But they are allowed to work as "headskinners." These rules, and thousands more, are found in the 1938 Fair Labor Standards Act, a complex federal law with a simple goal: Keep kids safe and in school. After almost 60 years of revision, federal child labor laws address everything from the time the sun comes up to the weight of a tractor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1996 | STEPHEN E. BLAIRE and JOAN B. HARPER, Stephen E. Blaire is an auxiliary bishop for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. Joan B. Harper heads the Justice and Peace Commission of the archdiocese. The Trendsetter List can be found on the World Wide Web at: http:/www.dol.gov/dol/esa/public/nosweat/trends.htm
This holiday shopping season has brought welcome news for many retailers as consumer confidence, buoyed by a growing economy, appears to have translated into record sales. Carefully crafted full-page ads and stylish store displays attract the buyer while avoiding any mention of the origin of the items for sale.
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was a normal 12-year-old kid, a kid who loved soccer and devoured the comics page every morning with his breakfast cereal. But then one day, Craig Kielburger read Page 1 instead. He read about a boy his own age on the other side of the world, in Pakistan. At 4, Iqbal Masih had been sold into bondage as a carpet weaver. He escaped six years later to become a living symbol of the evils of child labor. He won a number of international honors before he was murdered in Lahore in April 1995.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1996 | D'JAMILA SALEM-FITZGERALD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to growing concern about child labor abuses by foreign manufacturers, a House panel promoted legislation Monday that would prohibit U.S. firms from selling imported goods made by underage workers. The measure, introduced by the chairman of a House subcommittee that is investigating the concerns, was endorsed by Labor Secretary Robert Reich and television personality Kathie Lee Gifford. Rep. Chris Smith (R-N.J.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1995 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A picket line of garment workers outside a posh Guess? store in Beverly Hills this month aims to reveal alleged weaknesses in federal efforts to end apparel industry abuses through compliance agreements with manufacturers. The striking workers say they were mistreated by Good Time/Song of California, a contract sewing shop, after Guess? Inc. lowered the price per garment it was paying the firm.
BOOKS
December 18, 1994 | KATHLEEN KRULL
Grandmothers, writes distinguished African-American poet Nikki Giovanni, "are a lot like spinach or asparagus or brussels sprouts: something good for us that we appreciate much more in reflection than in actuality." To encourage grandchildren in appreciating these figures of wisdom and immense influence now rather than later, Giovanni has edited an unusual anthology, GRAND MOTHERS: Poems, Reminiscences, and Short Stories About the Keepers of Our Traditions (Holt: $15.95, ages 11 and up).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1994
I've never understood what are true conservative Republican principles--lower taxes, fewer regulations and less government interference in our lives ("Intraparty Squabbles Aid GOP Rivals," Letter, Aug. 14). Does that mean the terrible taxes that provide us with highways, bridges, libraries, schools, child labor laws, meat inspection, consumer protection and product labeling on our food and drugs, just to mention a few "government on our backs" controls? Silent majority of the Republican Party 70th Assembly District: Who would you appeal to if you were out of a job, sick, hungry and homeless--your wealthy Republican friends or big business?
NEWS
July 12, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That chic and sumptuous high-pile carpet that adorns the lawyer's office in Stuttgart, Germany, or the beachfront condo in Redondo Beach may have begun its life here on a high-backed vertical loom worked by Meena, 13. Six days a week, the village girl and seven friends, who sleep in a single cramped, dark room in a dirty dormitory whose halls smell of urine, get up at 6 a.m. and, after gulping down a meager breakfast of warm tea, begin work.
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to crack down on companies that subject teen-age employees to hazardous working conditions, the Labor Department on Thursday began enforcing stiffened penalties for child work safety law violations. Under the new sanctions, employers that allow young workers to suffer serious injury or death can be fined $10,000 for each violation. Previously, negligent companies faced a $10,000 penalty for each accident. A single accident can involve multiple violations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1994 | RICHARD ROTHSTEIN, Richard Rothstein is a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and the author of "The Global Hiring Hall" in the spring issue of the American Prospect
In Morocco on Friday, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade Uruguay Round will conclude when representatives of 121 nations initiate a new World Trade Organization. The deal almost fell through last week--not because of last winter's high-profile issues like European restrictions on American films or subsidies for French farmers, but because of new demands by the Clinton Administration for negotiations on "international worker rights."
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