Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsChild Mortality
IN THE NEWS

Child Mortality

NATIONAL
December 16, 2007 | By Charles Piller and Doug Smith, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
A neighbor shaved Matsepang Nyoba's head with an antiquated razor. Blood beaded on her scalp. Tears trickled down her cheeks, but not because of the pain. She was in mourning, and this was a ritual. Two days earlier, her newborn baby girl had died in the roach-infested maternity ward of Queen Elizabeth II, a crumbling sprawl that is the largest hospital in Lesotho, a mountainous nation of 2.1 million people surrounded by South Africa. Nyoba, 30, whose given name means "mother, have hope," has AIDS.
Advertisement
OPINION
May 2, 2010 | Sonia Shah
Last week, in honor of World Malaria Day, viewers of "American Idol" were urged to donate $10 for an insecticide-treated bed net to save an African child from malaria, the mosquito-transmitted scourge that infects about 300 million people every year, killing nearly 1 million. The premise behind the idea of treated nets is simple. The netting prevents malarial mosquitoes from biting people while they're asleep, and the insecticide kills and repels the insects. World health experts say that using the nets can reduce child mortality in malarial regions by 20%. But even as donations roll in and millions of bed nets pile up in warehouses across Africa, aid agencies and non-governmental organizations are quietly grappling with a problem: Data suggest that, at least in some places, nearly half of Africans who have access to the nets refuse to sleep under them.
BUSINESS
November 1, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Anti-Obamacare conservatives are chuckling over an exchange from the House's grilling of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on Wednesday morning, in which Rep. Renee Ellmers (R-N.C.) challenged Sebelius to explain why men should have to pay for maternity coverage in their health insurance plans. "To the best of your knowledge, has a man ever delivered a baby?" Ellmers asked. Ellmers and her cheering section seem to think this was hilarious , a conclusive, slam-dunk, let-me-hear-a-rimshot punchline.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2007 | Charles Piller and Doug Smith, Times Staff Writers
In a statement posted on its website, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has challenged portions of a Los Angeles Times article about Global Fund efforts in Africa. The Times report, published Sunday, said the Global Fund and other programs supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation have had a mixed effect on key measures of societal health in sub-Saharan Africa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1986
It was hard to keep from crying after reading Marjorie Miller's sad article (July 7) about the economic problems the people of Nicaragua are suffering. I remember well how, only a few years ago, the whole world looked at what was happening in Nicaragua as a model for developing nations. Child mortality was lessened. Illiteracy was fading away. Somewhere in the midst of this progress the United States decided because democracy, as we know it, wasn't being practiced--and because Cubans and Soviets were in the area--the social strides made by the Sandinistas were invalid.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2014 | By Shan Li
Billionaire and former tech mogul Bill Gates predicts that there will be almost no poor countries left in the world by 2035. Almost all nations will be either lower-middle income or wealthier, and most will have surpassed the 35 countries that are currently defined by the World Bank as low-income, Gates says in his annual letter for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. In the letter, Gates and his wife try to dispel what they say are myths about global poverty that hinder development: Poor countries are destined to stay that way, foreign aid is not helpful and saving lives leads to overpopulation.
OPINION
October 30, 2011 | By David Lam
The United Nations has identified Monday as the day world population hits 7 billion. Many find the Halloween date appropriate given the frightening prospect of this demographic milestone. As if 7 billion weren't scary enough, the U.N. projects 10 billion people by 2083, the addition of roughly three more Indias. But the parents of the 7-billionth person should not be afraid for their child's future. In spite of the daunting challenges facing the world, including global warming, rising food prices and a billion people in poverty, the 7-billionth child will almost surely have a better life than the 3-billionth or 6-billionth child.
WORLD
September 27, 2007 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush and Afghan President Hamid Karzai agreed Wednesday on the need to work jointly to fight narcotics trafficking, terrorism and a resurgent Taliban, and on the necessity of international help with energy needs, a White House official said. The two, in New York for the annual gathering of the U.N. General Assembly, met for about 30 minutes at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel. Bush used the session for an update on conditions in Afghanistan six years after the U.S.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2008 | James Hohmann, Times Staff Writer
Responding to skyrocketing global food prices, President Bush asked Congress on Thursday for $770 million in emergency foreign aid targeted at the neediest in the developing world. The announcement was welcomed on Capitol Hill. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) promised that Congress would "respond rapidly to the growing urgent need for international food assistance."
NEWS
November 30, 2001 | From Associated Press
Nearly 18 million children are living in poverty in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, despite 10 years of growing economies in the region, the U.N. Children's Fund said Thursday. The vast majority of poor children--16 million--live in former Soviet countries, UNICEF said in its 192-page report, "A Decade of Transition." In Moldova and Tajikistan, nearly three-quarters of children live on less than $2.15 a day--a World Bank yardstick for poverty.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|