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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2000 | SARAH TORRIBIO-BOND
The Center for the Improvement of Child Caring will received a $300,000 grant from the Los Angeles County Proposition 10 Commission to expand education programs for parents and child-care professionals. Proposition 10, approved by state voters in 1998, levies a 50-cent tax on cigarettes to be used for early childhood development programs. "The new grant enables us to bring the best parenting education programs and materials into child-care and family day-care centers," said Kerby T.
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NEWS
June 9, 1987 | From Reuters
Nancy Reagan talked today about the 1981 assassination attempt against her husband with the widow of Sweden's slain Prime Minister Olof Palme, who was never invited to the White House. "I offered her my personal condolences," Mrs. Reagan told reporters after a 30-minute meeting with Lisbet Palme at the office of Prime Minister Ingvar Carlsson. The Palmes were walking home unguarded through central Stockholm on Feb.
BOOKS
May 24, 1987 | Thomas Davey
Child psychologist Bruno Bettelheim persuasively argues that "raising children is a creative endeavor, an art rather than a science." For this reason, he cautions parents against becoming overly dependent on child-rearing books full of various formulas for "successful parenting." The parent-child relationship is not something to be 'fixed' in accordance with a manual of instructions.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
The FBI joined a police search Tuesday for a child psychologist suspected of killing his 25-year-old girlfriend in his suburban townhouse, then abandoning their 18-month-old son in an industrial area 90 miles away. Folsom police said there was a history of domestic violence between James Dewayne Nivette, 54, and Gina Barnett, whose bullet-ridden body was found at Nivette's home in a quiet, wooded cul-de-sac about 12:40 a.m. Tuesday.
HEALTH
August 1, 2011 | By Jessica Pauline Ogilvie, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Leslie Walden's daughter Kennedy will turn 5 in October, which makes her eligible to start kindergarten. But the school year will begin without her. Kennedy is a bright and enthusiastic child, her preschool teacher said — but she wasn't quite mature enough for the private-school kindergarten Walden and her husband had been considering. That assessment echoed Walden's motherly instincts. "I personally felt like [she] is better off being the oldest kid in the group rather than trying to catch up," said Walden, an attorney who lives in Playa Vista.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1994 | CARROLL LACHNIT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Lion King's" animation dazzles. It has the golden G rating. But most important for parents seeking wholesome entertainment, "The Lion King" carries the ultimate blessing: the Disney name. So why would parents hesitate?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
"I do it for me I have the right to say no I live for now Life is not a movie . " --Rebecca Schaeffer Untitled Poem, July, 1989 Slain actress Rebecca Schaeffer was eulogized here Sunday as "a precious gift--a gift that was snatched back, but one that will give us extraordinary memories." Rabbi Joshua Stampfer told the 200 mourners at Ahavai Sholom Cemetery's small chapel that Schaeffer "brought in her short life more joy to more people than most of us achieve in a lifetime."
NEWS
December 2, 1985 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, Doheny lives in Burbank. and
When Jonathan Kellerman and Faye Marder met 15 years ago, they shared career goals in health care. He planned to enter psychology; she wanted to become a dentist. Since that time, they've married, had three children and watched their lives take an unexpected--one might even say mysterious--turn. With nary a writing course between them, the Kellermans have both become successful mystery novelists.
TRAVEL
June 19, 1994 | EILEEN OGINTZ, Ogintz is author of "Taking the Kids to the Great Southwest" (HarperCollins West, $9.95). Taking the Kids appears weekly.
They skipped the ghost stories and old camp songs. Instead, the 8-year-old Girl Scouts opted for tales about their families as they sat in the deepening twilight around the campfire. "Me next!" they begged for another turn. The stories came tumbling out: the one about the soggy camping trip, the way a brother always hid under restaurant tables when he was a baby and the little sister who never failed to get carsick.
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